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GregHi

Info from my Shia friend

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I sent a text to my friend this morning to see if he could confirm Allawi is the new PM and he just replied. He said “Yes, it’s true!” He said, and remember this is just his opinion and bleak outlook on things.. “like I said before, it won’t change anything”.. meaning the GOI will remain corrupt.. I then asked him if the protestors were upset from the news? And his reply was “Yes they are”..

 

His responses are really what we expected but just kind of confirmed how the people feel about the whole situation.. 

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5 minutes ago, slb said:

Is this Allawi Sunni or Shia ? 

 

I asked my friend and his response was funny..
 

”Actually I'm not sure what is he, but the PM should be Shia 

 

”They chose him just like all previous PM. 
They will not choose one that put them in jail”

 

 

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For some reason I thought he was Sunni... Which would be better for the Kurds and worse for the Iranians.

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From a 2012 article , appears to be Sunni. 

Iraq's communications minister has resigned, accusing Prime Minister Nouri Maliki of refusing to stop "political interference" in his ministry.

Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi, a member of the Sunni-backed Iraqiyya bloc, said he had submitted his resignation a month ago, but that it had only now been accepted.

There has been no word yet from the prime minister on the allegations.

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Mohammed Allawi appointed new Iraq PM, protesters reject him

Ex-minister named as Iraq prime minister-designate, but anti-government demonstrators say he is part of ruling elite.

by Linah Alsaafin
an hour ago
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Newly appointed Prime Minister of Iraq, Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi, appealed to protesters in his first speech [Prime Minister media office]
Newly appointed Prime Minister of Iraq, Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi, appealed to protesters in his first speech [Prime Minister media office]

Baghdad, Iraq – Anti-government protesters in Iraq were quick to dismiss President Barham Salih’s appointment of Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi as prime minister-designate, as rallies took place in the capital and cities in the country's southern provinces.

The president’s announcement came after he issued an ultimatum to Iraq's fractious parliament, warning that if they did not appoint a new premier by Saturday he would do so himself.

But anti-government protesters did not welcome the announcement, with hundreds in the capital's Tahrir Square chanting "Mohammed Allawi, rejected!", videos posted on social media showed.

In the southern city of Nasiriyah, protesters issued a statement saying they categorically rejected Allawi's selection.

"He is the compromised candidate that belongs to the sectarian power sharing political system (muhasasa) we are protesting against, and does not represent the aspirations of the protest sites," the statement said. "Based on this, our response will be to escalate things stronger than on previous occasions."

Allawi’s appointment, the statement continued, was brought about "by the same criminal, corrupt class that brought us to where we are now".

Since October, anti-government protesters have called for a complete overhaul of the country’s ruling political elite and an end to corruption. Their demands include the appointment of a politically independent candidate as prime minister, early elections, and holding accountable those who have killed at least 500 protesters so far.

Despite ex-prime minister Adel Abdul Mahdi resigning on December 1, he continued in a caretaker capacity until a new prime minister was chosen, leading to a two-month deadlock that resulted in the protesters accusing the government of deliberate stalling.

'We will escalate'

Allawi, 65, served as a communications minister under the government of former prime minister Nouri al-Maliki in 2006 and 2010. Two years later, he resigned from his post, accusing al-Maliki of "political interference" in his ministry.

Moments after his appointment was announced, Allawi shared a pre-recorded video on his Twitter page, where he addressed the protesters directly.

"My power is derived from you," he began. "If it were not for your courage and sacrifices then there would have been no changes in the country."

"You protested for your homeland, and if I am not able to fulfill your demands that I am unworthy of this position," he added.

However, protesters in the capital reacted with dismay, saying that he represented the old ruling elite.

One protester, 25-year-old Yousef Abd, said there is "no doubt we reject Allawi in the position of prime minister".

"If the government insists on forcing him on us we will definitely escalate things," he told Al Jazeera via telephone from Tahrir Square.

Mohammed Aqeel, another protester agreed.

"The general feeling from most protest sites is that they view Allawi as being cut from the same cloth as the politicians in power," he told Al Jazeera. "He belongs to the same system we don't want."

According to Aqeel, large student demonstrations were expected to take place on Sunday against Allawi’s appointment, which he hoped would unite the protest movement in Tahrir.

Earlier on Saturday, skirmishes had taken place between Sadrist supporters and politically independent protesters, after the former took over the strategic Turkish restaurant building and drove out the other protesters from there.

The Sadrists, along with members of an affiliated militia Saraya al-Salam, had rejoined the protest a week after their leader and head of the largest bloc in parliament Muqtada al-Sadr announced his withdrawal. But on Friday, Sadr called for a renewal of "the peaceful reformist revolution".

Test of 'independence'

Sajad Jiyad, managing director of Bayan Centre, a think-tank, told Al Jazeera there had been an agreement between the largest parties in Parliament to nominate Allawi.

"Now that has happened we can expect a lot of negotiation around cabinet formation and this will be a test to see how much independence Allawi has and how much support for his nominees to the cabinet he can get from the parties in Parliament," he said.

Jiyad added that protesters who have rejected Allawi's nomination believe he will be "beholden to the same political system they accuse of corruption and are protesting against".

Political analyst Sarmad al-Bayati, said it was still too early to see what affect the appointment of Allawi would have.

"Allawi was not a new name to be suggested as a candidate ... But I don't think he represents the aspirations of the Iraqi people," he told Al Jazeera.

"He will probably face the same limitations that Adel Abdul Mahdi experienced," he noted.

According to the constitution, a replacement for Abdul Mahdi should have been identified fifteen days after his resignation in early December. Instead, it has taken rival blocs nearly two months of jockeying to select Allawi as their consensus candidate.

Abdul Mahdi's rise to power was the product of a provisional alliance between parliament's two main blocs - Sairoon, led by Shia leader Moqtada al-Sadr, and Fatah, which is headed by Hadi al-Amiri and includes leaders associated with the paramilitary Popular Mobilisation Forces (PMF, or Hasdh al-Shaabi).

SOURCE: AL JAZEERA NEWS

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/02/iraq-president-appoints-mohammed-allawi-pm-state-tv-200201150554113.html

 

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This news could speed up the RV, as he is going to have to do something to please the crowd, even if that is the tough job of flushing the pro-Iranians in the govt., militias, and Sadr's goons?

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He don’t represent the aspirations of Iraqi people. 
He’s an Iraqi Shia.

In my opinion it will be the same, Iran interventionism and rampant corruption 

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13 hours ago, Laid Back said:

He don’t represent the aspirations of Iraqi people. 
He’s an Iraqi Shia.

In my opinion it will be the same, Iran interventionism and rampant corruption 

 

 

Agreed.....They do need a radical change in the Country...Some could call it   a Revolution....Which should be carried on by Iraqis only with no outside  intervention / influence  by whomever.....We'll see

Edited by umbertino
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8 hours ago, Dinarrock said:

LB do you have something that shows he is Shia? Slb posted above you saying he was from the Sunni bloc, just curious?

 

Law requires that the 3 heads of Iraqi government are represented by a Kurd, a Sunni and a Shia: President is a Kurd (Saleh), Speaker of the House is a Sunni (Halbousi), and the Prime Minister is a Shia (i.e., Allawi, Mahdi, Maliki).

Edited by Carrello
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So now this article from BBC says shia. sorry for confusion... Appear even news outlets are confused.

In a video released on his social media accounts on Saturday, Mr Allawi announced that he had been nominated and called on Iraqis to continue protesting until their demands were met.

"If not for your sacrifices and your bravery, there would have been no change in the country," he said. "I believe in you, and for this reason I will ask you to continue protesting."

He promised to hold those responsible for the killing of protesters accountable and to combat corruption.

Mr Allawi, who is Shia, studied and worked in Lebanon and the UK before entering Iraqi politics following the 2003 invasion. He served as minister of communications twice.

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9 hours ago, Dinarrock said:

LB do you have something that shows he is Shia? Slb posted above you saying he was from the Sunni bloc, just curious?

Dinarrock, thanks for you input. Read Carrello’s comment.

3 hours ago, umbertino said:

 

 

Agreed.....They do need a radical change in the Country...Some could call it   a Revolution....Which should be carried on by Iraqis only with no outside  intervention / influence  by whomever.....We'll see

umbertino, totally agree with you.!

45 minutes ago, Carrello said:

 

Law requires that the 3 heads of Iraqi government are represented by a Kurd, a Sunni and a Shia: President is a Kurd (Saleh), Speaker of the House is a Sunni (Halbousi), and the Prime Minister is a Shia (i.e., Allawi, Mahdi, Maliki).

Carrello, long time no see, my friend. Thanks for your comment. 😊


 

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Thats hilarious Thugs! Really non-stop on your part. Tiure a cure for misery and despression at times....

 

Pitcher makes a good point: 

 

Perhaps Adam.should amend the rules on this site to include a statement stating or suggesting that people not eat drink or carry scolding hot substances when reading your comments!

 

 

 

 

 

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On 2/3/2020 at 1:34 AM, Carrello said:

 

Law requires that the 3 heads of Iraqi government are represented by a Kurd, a Sunni and a Shia: President is a Kurd (Saleh), Speaker of the House is a Sunni (Halbousi), and the Prime Minister is a Shia (i.e., Allawi, Mahdi, Maliki).

Thanks didn’t know this this...

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On 2/2/2020 at 8:34 AM, Carrello said:

 

Law requires that the 3 heads of Iraqi government are represented by a Kurd, a Sunni and a Shia: President is a Kurd (Saleh), Speaker of the House is a Sunni (Halbousi), and the Prime Minister is a Shia (i.e., Allawi, Mahdi, Maliki).

 

May be more "tradition" than law, but the two are hard to tell apart sometimes.

 

On 2/2/2020 at 1:41 PM, presence said:

 

 

Perhaps Adam.should amend the rules on this site to include a statement stating or suggesting that people not eat drink or carry scolding hot substances when reading your comments!

 

 

The "rules" here haven't changed in years but that one might be worth adding :lol: 

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6 hours ago, Adam Montana said:

 

May be more "tradition" than law, but the two are hard to tell apart sometimes.

 

 

The "rules" here haven't changed in years but that one might be worth adding :lol: 

Quick  Easy question Have a friend that wants to buy some dinar where would I send them. I bought mine 10 yrs ago not sure what to to him 

Thanks

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On 2/1/2020 at 7:11 PM, slb said:

For some reason I thought he was Sunni... Which would be better for the Kurds and worse for the Iranians.

 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, alloywheelmaster said:

Quick  Easy question Have a friend that wants to buy some dinar where would I send them. I bought mine 10 yrs ago not sure what to to him 

Thanks

Safe Dinar, Treasury Vault, Xchange of America, & and try Ebay as well

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Tonight my friend was visibly upset. He said in Najaf, his hometown there were 4 more protestors killed. He said if he could fly home and join the protests he would. “When is enough going to be enough”, was his words.. 

 

somebody, anybody needs to do something about this endless killing of protestors.

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2 hours ago, GregHi said:

Tonight my friend was visibly upset. He said in Najaf, his hometown there were 4 more protestors killed. He said if he could fly home and join the protests he would. “When is enough going to be enough”, was his words.. 

 

somebody, anybody needs to do something about this endless killing of protestors.

GregHi, i agree that this has to come to an end. Iraq will never move on until the killing stops. 

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When corruption is involved and as deep as it is there. The Iranian stronghold will go to the ends of the earth to hang on, there willing to do what ever is necessary in there eyes  And that means killing anyone who stands against them.  Unfortunately more innocents will die before there pushed back far enough. I am glad the Iragi's are standing up for themselves,  but its going to take time. Go Irag and GM DV

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