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The Husseiniya threshold resolves the biggest tribal conflict in Basra that has lasted for years


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visual deputy: American pressure pushed Abadi to back down from dismissing al-Shammari

Optical deputy: American pressure pushed Abadi to back down from dismissing al-Shammari

 Twilight News    

 24 minutes ago

 

The deputy governor of the province of Basra Uday Awad that Prime Minister Haider Abadi retreat from the dismissal of the commander of Basra operations, "because of the pressure of the US consulate" in the province. 
The security sources said yesterday that Abadi, decided to dismiss the commander of Basra operations Lieutenant General Jamil al-Shammari and appointed Rashid Fleih instead of former commander of operations Samarra. 
However, Awwad said in an interview with the twilight news, "despite our demand as deputies for Basra to Prime Minister Haider Abadi, the dismissal of the commander of operations, but it declined because of the pressure of the US consulate in Basra, which planned to ignite strife in Iraq and Basra through the commander of operations, which hit peaceful demonstrators through the use of Live bullets that have penetrated the bodies of many innocents demanding services, including drinking water. "
He added that the commander of operations is still working to complete the American project in Basra and try to exploit the Basra crisis to settle international accounts, not to the visual citizen any income, warning of not to remain silent. On the continuation of the commander of operations in Basra, "he says. 
Basra province has been witnessing angry demonstrations for months demanding services, primarily drinking water and electricity, and developed into the intervention of security forces, killing a number of demonstrators and wounding others. 
In the last few days intensified demonstrations in Basra, the demonstrators burned the building of the provincial council and the headquarters of political parties, including the headquarters of the "Badr" and the "Dawa" and "Virtue" and "Asaib Ahl al-Haq"
Discontent in Basra has been exacerbated by lack of jobs and lack of electricity and potable water supplies. 
More recently, hundreds of people have been taken to hospitals after drinking contaminated water. 
The population accuses the central government of corruption in Baghdad, saying it allowed the collapse of infrastructure in the region, which provides a large share of the country's oil wealth. 
The prime minister vowed on Friday to accelerate the disbursement of financial allocations for the development of basic services in Basra. 
Iraq's top Shi'ite cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, has blamed the city's turmoil on political leaders, calling for a new government "different from its predecessors."

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http://www.shafaaq.com/ar/Ar_NewsReader/ae5c9844-622c-47d7-98ca-48c09e6b44c5

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I apologize for posting news items and then replying to my own posts but sometimes I just have to comment on the lunacy of Iraq.     This article to me illustrates how backwards these people

"angry" you need to get pissed an bring down the house....Why aren't you screaming at your 320 fellow porch monkeys that just decided to take a 2 week vacation after showing up for work one day just t

If the corrupt thought they could continue running the government on a “ business as usual “ - they might want to rethink that now. 

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5 minutes ago, KristiD said:

This can't be good.  Just when we think Iraq might be close to getting it all together and finally move forward, BAM!  slammed down again!!  😞   https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/moqtada-al-sadr-calls-iraq-pm-step-down-basra-crisis-deepens-622380245 

 

Muqtada al-Sadr calls on Iraq PM to step down as Basra crisis deepens

#InsideIraq

Cleric makes demand as death toll from recent protests in Basra reaches 12 and southern city's airport is hit by rockets

sadr%3Aabadi-6%3A23%3A18-afp.jpg
Trying to hold onto his post in the next government, Abadi, right, had formed an alliance with Sadr, left (AFP)
MEE and agencies's picture
Saturday 8 September 2018 15:29 UTC
Last update: 
Sunday 9 September 2018 4:22 UTC
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Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who had entered an alliance with Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi following elections earlier this year, has called upon the premier to resign as deadly protests in the southern city of Basra worsen.

"We demand the government apologise to the people and resign immediately," said Hassan al-Aqouli, spokesman for Sadr's list, which won the most seats in May's poll.

Ahmed al-Assadi, spokesman for the second-largest list, Conquest Alliance, also called for Abadi's resignation, denouncing "the government's failure to resolve the crisis in Basra".

The call came as parliament met on Saturday for an emergency session to discuss the crisis in public services in the city after 12 protesters were killed this week, the Iranian consulate torched and its airport hit by rockets.

The meeting was originally demanded by Sadr, whose political bloc won the largest number of seats in May elections although a new government has yet to be formed.

Sadr had called on politicians to present "radical and immediate" solutions at Saturday's session or step down.

On Friday, Iraq's most senior Shia cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, called for a government to be urgently formed to resolve the crisis in Basra.

Abadi described the unrest as "political sabotage" as he joined the session along with several ministers, charging that "the question of public services" was being exploited for political ends.

His government has announced the allocation of an unspecified amount of extra funds for Basra, although demonstrators say that billions of dollars in emergency funding pledged in July has failed to materialise.

In a session attended by 172 deputies in the 329-seat house, Abadi traded barbs with Basra's governor, Asaad al-Eidani, who is also parliament speaker.

Iraqi officials have imposed a curfew on Basra starting at 4pm (1pm GMT) on Saturday, a military statement said.

Since Tuesday, demonstrators in Basra have set ablaze government buildings, the Iranian consulate and the offices of pro-Tehran militias and political parties.

The anger flared after the hospitalisation of 30,000 people who had drunk polluted water, in an oil-rich region where residents have for weeks complained of water and electricity shortages, corruption among officials and unemployment.

At least 12 demonstrators have been killed and 50 wounded in clashes with security forces, according to the interior ministry.

Airport and Iranian consulate attacked

Hours before parliament met, four rockets fired by unidentified assailants struck inside the perimeter of the Basra airport, security sources said.

Staff at the airport, which is located near the US consulate in Basra, said flights were not affected.

The attack came after a day of rage in the southern city, where hundreds of protesters stormed the fortified Iranian consulate, causing no casualties but sparking condemnation.

Abadi said he had instructed security forces to "act decisively against the acts of vandalism that accompanied the demonstrations".

Iraq's Joint Operations Command, which includes the army and police, vowed a "severe" response with "exceptional security measures", including a ban on protests and group travel.

The foreign ministry called the attack on the consulate "an unacceptable act undermining the interests of Iraq and its international relations".

Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Bahram Ghassemi denounced the "savage attack", Iran's Fars news agency reported.

A spokesman for the consulate said that all diplomats and staff had been evacuated from the building before the protesters attacked, and that nobody was hurt.

Iran's ambassador to Iraq, Iraj Masjedi, said the consulate was "totally demolished" and charged that "foreign agents close to the US, Zionists and some Arab countries are trying to sabotage Iran-Iraq relations", Iran's ILNA news agency reported.

'Sick and abandoned'

The wave of protests first broke out in Basra in July before spreading to other parts of the country, with demonstrators condemning corruption among Iraqi officials and demanding jobs.

Since then, at least 27 people have been killed nationwide.

"We're thirsty, we're hungry, we are sick and abandoned," protester Ali Hussein told the AFP news agency on Friday in Basra after another night of violence.

"Demonstrating is a sacred duty and all honest people ought to join."

The anger on Basra's streets was "in response to the government's intentional policy of neglect", the head of the region's human rights council Mehdi al-Tamimi said.

Iraq has been struggling to rebuild its infrastructure and economy after decades of bloody conflicts, including an eight-year war with Iran in the 1980s, the US-led invasion of 2003 and the battle against the Islamic State group.

In August, the oil ministry announced that crude exports for August had hit their highest monthly figure this year, with nearly 112 million barrels of oil bringing $7.7bn to state coffers.

Iraq, however, suffers from persistent corruption and many Iraqis complain that the country's oil wealth is unfairly distributed.

Parliament said deputies would hear speeches by Abadi and key ministers and discuss the water contamination crisis, the latest breakdown in public services to spark public anger.

Two months ago, Abadi pledged a multi-billion dollar emergency plan to revive infrastructure and services in southern Iraq, one of the country's most marginalised regions.

Trying to hold onto his post in the next government, Abadi had formed an alliance with Sadr, a former militia chief who has called for Iraq to have greater political independence from both neighbouring Iran and the United States.

Yikes. Maybe it's time we all start praying for Iraq instead of bashing them for being lazy and backward etc. Calling them names is getting us more chaos and what we don't want. Well intentioned prayers might help God help them across the finish line and bring peace and prosperity to their long suffering people. Right now, they (and we) need God more than ever.

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13 hours ago, Pitcher said:

Abu Al-Hassan Alaa, 17 years old, said that he and his friends were motivated to target the Iranian structure because they opposed Iranian political interference in Iraq.

“Iranian intervention in the affairs of our country is destroying Iraq,” he said. 

good point

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5 minutes ago, trident said:

Abu Al-Hassan Alaa, 17 years old, said that he and his friends were motivated to target the Iranian structure because they opposed Iranian political interference in Iraq.

“Iranian intervention in the affairs of our country is destroying Iraq,” he said. 

If this 17 year old  young man can see the that Iran/Al-Maliki is the problem, the Iraq leadership must also know, yet, they consistently fail to step up and “DO” what’s right for their people? Now Sadr’s calling for Abadi to resign for his failure to quell issues in Basra... “Deeds not Words”...get off your 4th point of contact and take charge! The entire world can see Maliki is the problem...so crush that fly!!🇺🇸

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1 hour ago, miquel said:

Yikes. Maybe it's time we all start praying for Iraq instead of bashing them for being lazy and backward etc. Calling them names is getting us more chaos and what we don't want. Well intentioned prayers might help God help them across the finish line and bring peace and prosperity to their long suffering people. Right now, they (and we) need God more than ever.

I'm with you 100% Miguel....I read negative comments everyday about Iraq it's getting old...God doesn't bless Mess....If we all line our positive frequency with the Universe than the law of attraction will be Honor for Iraq....Simple as that....Instead of calling Iraq government Monkeys,snails and all bad names,let try praying for them and there people.....Until we humble ourself,'s to God Will....None of this is Going to Happen(RV,RI or Float)......If we stay positive intentions with Iraq Watch how fast the Fructation will Happen....We all can Do This.....Go Rv

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Thanks KristiD....Hell...If I was Abadi I'd demand a severance package in IQD cash in the newer small denominational notes...Let'em know it's been real and fun but not really fun...take the money and run...Let this finely come into fruitation and see how fast I become a figment of imaginations....

 

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These people are their own worst enemy. They elect a GOI that made a mockery of the political process for 4 years. Prior to that allowed al Maliki to steal billions. And now they want to hang that on Abadi??  But if Abadi promised them action back in July, promised prosecution of the corrupt last year, then there needs to be some forward movement. Pointing fingers and moving lips don't count. And the GOI doesn't help their cause when they meet every 2 weeks without a quorum. The fools are running the asylum.

         

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2 minutes ago, King Bean said:

These people are their own worst enemy. They elect a GOI that made a mockery of the political process for 4 years. Prior to that allowed al Maliki to steal billions. And now they want to hang that on Abadi??  But if Abadi promised them action back in July, promised prosecution of the corrupt last year, then there needs to be some forward movement. Pointing fingers and moving lips don't count. And the GOI doesn't help their cause when they meet every 2 weeks without a quorum. The fools are running the asylum.

         

Agreed!!!🇺🇸

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9 minutes ago, King Bean said:

These people are their own worst enemy. They elect a GOI that made a mockery of the political process for 4 years. Prior to that allowed al Maliki to steal billions. And now they want to hang that on Abadi??  But if Abadi promised them action back in July, promised prosecution of the corrupt last year, then there needs to be some forward movement. Pointing fingers and moving lips don't count. And the GOI doesn't help their cause when they meet every 2 weeks without a quorum. The fools are running the asylum.

         

....Yea they ought to take after our government as an example...Iraq can't get rid of Maliki because of the corruption, greed and basic ignorance of fact...the USA has a black homosexual with big ears....that hasn't the dignity of honor...

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39 minutes ago, Carrello said:

Pacman, I agree completely with you. Negative comments do nothing but attract negative energy, which simply continues the cycle.

Thanks Carrello...Things will get Better...The Evil Spirit will lose...Go Iraq

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16 minutes ago, TexasMike1958 said:

Why do I have this feeling that Iran and their mole Maliki are behind the unrest in Basra???

I would think that is exactly what is going on.....Iran is hurting under the sanctions and Sadr wants to do right by the US and stop the Flow of the USD into Iran.....Do the same thing there that the left here is doing stirring the pot using BLM, Antifa or BAMA. 

 

Where are the Protesters getting Rockets? For all we know obama could be somewhere on the side lines give Iran advice on how to stir the pot to create chaos.

 

Karsten

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3 hours ago, CSM (R) Thackrey said:

If this 17 year old  young man can see the that Iran/Al-Maliki is the problem, the Iraq leadership must also know, yet, they consistently fail to step up and “DO” what’s right for their people? Now Sadr’s calling for Abadi to resign for his failure to quell issues in Basra... “Deeds not Words”...get off your 4th point of contact and take charge! The entire world can see Maliki is the problem...so crush that fly!!🇺🇸

4th point of contact, I love it. Every leg on the plant is figuring that one out.  

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Basra Crisis Pits Iraqi PM against Sadr

 
iraqi_pm_haidar_al-abadi._reuters.jpg?itok=G4BrWQun
The tables turned on Saturday against Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi as two main blocs that were victorious in the May parliamentary elections demanded his resignation in wake of the protests in the southern city of Basra.

Abadi. who was banking on his alliance with Sadr movement leader Moqtada al-Sadr to become premier for a second term, is seeing this chance go up in smoke.
Sadr, who is head of the Sairoun bloc, emerged as the victor in the elections.

Parliament held an extraordinary session Saturday to discuss the Basra protests. Sairoun spokesman MP Hassan al-Aqouli called on “Abadi to step down and apologize to the people.”

Ahmed al-Assadi, spokesman for the second-largest list in parliament, the Fateh alliance, condemned "the government's failure to resolve the crisis in Basra", where 12 protesters were killed this week in clashes with security forces.

Abadi for his part, called for Basra to be kept away from the political dispute between parties and armed factions there, warning that the situation could deteriorate into an armed clash.

Sadr, meanwhile, called for reviewing the way in which candidates can run for the position of prime minister. Saturday’s parliament session was preceded by a verbal quarrel between Abadi’s guards and parliament security forces. The meeting also ended with a verbal spat between the premier and Basra Governor Asaad al-Idani.

Political science professor at the University of Baghdad Dr. Khaled Abdulilah told Asharq Al-Awsat that the crisis in Basra is part of the political dispute between rival blocs over the formation of the new government and the largest bloc in parliament.

The political dispute has reached a dangerous stage because it is not just a struggle for power, but a struggle “for controlling oil, ports and the distribution of gains,” he added.

Official government spokesman Dr. Ali al-Dabbagh told Asharq Al-Awsat: “It is clear that the protests have taken a turn that not only reflects popular anger among the youth…, but it also reflects the fierce internal, regional and international competition to control Iraq.”

He noted Iran and the United States’ agendas in Iraq, but also remarked how political powers within the country itself are threatening to topple a government, should it be formed.

This reflects agendas that are seeking to eliminate the other are part of the wider conflict between Tehran and Washington, he warned.
Moreover, he remarked that the current government and Abadi himself have been unable to contain the Basra crisis.

 

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Iraq's Hashd al-Sha’abi:

US diplomatic missions behind Basra violence

US diplomatic missions behind Basra violence  

Iraq's Hashd al-Sha’abi says it has evidence showing US diplomatic missions in the Arab country have instigated the recent violence in the southern oil-rich city of Basra. 

AhlulBayt News Agency (ABNA): Iraq's Hashd al-Sha’abi says it has evidence showing US diplomatic missions in the Arab country have instigated the recent violence in the southern oil-rich city of Basra. 

"We have complete information and documents that show the US embassy and consulate in the country caused the Basra unrest," Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the second-in-command of the volunteer anti-terror fighters, said on Sunday. 

Basra has been rocked by deadly protests since Tuesday. The protests took an ugly turn on Friday when a group of masked assailants raided government buildings and offices of political parties and set them ablaze. The Iranian consulate was among the premises gutted in the rampage. 

Muhandis held Washington responsible for the Basra unrest, saying it was actually meant to sow discord among different Iraqi political parties and movements. 

He also vowed to respond to the Basra incidents and stressed that the Iraqis would never engage in a9nother civil war. 

President Fuad Masum condemned the attacks on buildings, including the Iranian consulate, and called for an immediate investigation into the raids. 

In a statement released on Saturday, he said "some extremists" had hijacked the protests to attack Iraqi and foreign buildings. 

Masum underlined the need for boosting "brotherly relations" with Iran, which was famously the first country to rush to Iraq's help in 2014 when Daesh terrorists reached the gates of Baghdad. 

Protesters in Basra are angry about endemic corruption, collapsing infrastructure, poor public services, high rates of poverty, soaring unemployment, and contamination of potable water. 

At least 15 protesters have died in clashes with security forces since the beginning of the month, health officials have said. 

Security forces were deployed to patrol the streets of Basra before officials eventually lifted a curfew that was imposed in the wake of the protests. 

Basra, once known as the "Venice of the East” because of its freshwater canals, has been hit by an acute water crisis and crippling electricity shortages this summer amid surging temperatures. 

Adding to the outrage is a water pollution crisis and salt water seeping into tap water that is making residents sick. 

The water is reportedly so polluted it cannot even be used for cooking or washing. The protests began in June, tapered off, but then restarted Monday following a surge in water poisoning cases. 

On Saturday, the two leading groups in the parliament called on Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to step down. 

Muqtada al-Sadr 's Sairoon (Marching Towards Reform) bloc, and the Fatah (Conquest) alliance led by secretary general of Badr Organization Hadi al-Ameri lashed out at the Iraqi premier over the Basra chaos. 

"We demand the government apologize to the people and resign immediately," said Sairoon spokesman Hassan al-Aqouli. 

Fatah spokesman Ahmed al-Assadi also condemned "the government's failure to resolve the crisis in Basra." 

He said Fatah was "on the same wavelength" as Sairoon and that the pair would work together to form a new government. 

 

http://en.abna24.com/news/middle-east/us-diplomatic-missions-behind-basra-violence_908641.html

 

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  • yota691 changed the title to The Husseiniya threshold resolves the biggest tribal conflict in Basra that has lasted for years

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