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http://www.cbi.iq/

Well people, I hope it is dollar movement, but the rate did change on cbi website. We really made some money. laugh.gif

WOW! Look at the CBI Website. It CHANGED! From 1170 all the way to 1166 dinars to the dollar! At this new rate we'll all be unbelievably rich!

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There are a couple threads pertaining to the CBI Update. I will merge them so we can be able to see all of our comments in one thread.

Thank you for the post!!!!th_smiley_two_thumbs_up.gif

***///

Why, thank you kindly for your efforts on our behalf, lovely MsCarla!

This ol' goat was gettin' dizzy bouncin' back n' forth all mornin'...!

As usual, you're a real doll! :wub:

Edited by SgtFuryUSCZ
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Are you 100% positive its never said anything but 1170?? Just havent seen anything official yet stating the IMF removed this program rate and that they were going to let the dinar show its "true" value....

Would be awesome if they did actually remove it....

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Hey I just checked the CBI site and we RV'd finally from 1170 to the dollar down to 1166, woo hoo! Well atleast there is some movement! :lol::lol::lol::lol::P

I think my investment is now worth only a few thousand less than what I paid for it, just kidding gang, I think we are very close to it revealing itself. Hopefully Adam can shed some light on where we are today! GO RV! B)

Edited by DiveDeepSix

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I think he means that if something moves it is not necessarily stable. Any movement at all, positive or negative, would qualify as "instability."

You have a good point.

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Are you 100% positive its never said anything but 1170?? Just havent seen anything official yet stating the IMF removed this program rate and that they were going to let the dinar show its "true" value..."

What is its "true value." The last thing I would think you would want would be for the IQD to float.

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the reason for the small change in my opinion is because the U.S dollar is flooding the iraqi markets right now and its putting the dinar stability in jeopardy. This is just temperary folks nothing to be concerned about to counter what is going on with the recent action with the U.s dollar nothing more. Of course we wil all know the true rate when they actually implement the new budget.

possible but not likely this rate wouldnt go well with their biggest budget in iraq's history.

I find it strange that the rate on CBI has never changed before because of the Dollar value changing. Why now?

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I find it strange that the rate on CBI has never changed before because of the Dollar value changing. Why now?

Because the IMF has released (unlocked) their currency. This gives Iraq full control to hopefully RV.

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My I touch says 1165.5

A change of .34%

This is unusual. Probably an indication of a Dinar shortage caused by the CBI selling of US Dollars.

It's unusual because they normally have had it frozen at the artificial rate. Hopefully they'll let it appreciate more.

:P

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that's what I saw yesterday....it's dropping. slowly but surely

;););)

"slowly but surely, indeed!" . It's better move like a turtle, slow yet moving than be a sloth, steady for years. GO RV, go turtles, but I hope the rate gallops like a horse soon.

Because the IMF has released (unlocked) their currency. This gives Iraq full control to hopefully RV.

I hope you're correct. We can only hope it will be over soon.

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folks as before mentioned in this thread (combined thread) this could be a true test.

A test that maybe did not show on all boards.

Therefore failed.

Maybe this was a true "PING"?

If so, maybe a few adjustments and a few days later we may be playing "PING PONG" with the true <<<< RV>>>>

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I think we have to agree this is different. No matter where the dollar was up or down Iraq stayed at its same old rate for three years.

Here is what I am thinking, it was three years to date. So there was a plan back in what 2008 or 2009 or before that on how the Iraqi dinar was going to be handled. We have often wondered if they were going to RD why didn't they? We can understand why they did not RV, they needed to get many duck in a row before they did so.

We have dinar that so far ends at 2010, doesn't mean they still did not print them I understand they have. However it appears some people bought dinar back in 2004 that had 2010 dates. Which means their plates or software whatever they use for printing currency is set at that date. If that is so, this is when the new currency comes in, which they planned a long time ago.

Now we hear about stages that were planned several years ago. Now we hear we are finished with the first of three stages. I am perplexed and hope I am right, they stated yesterday the lifting of the 3 zero's was first, well if they were going to lop them why are they still here? So was lifting them not physical but bringing in the dinar off the streets and surrounding countries? I like that much better than kicking the zero's out of the car. The three zero deletion is going to noticed on the new currency that we know.

So the new lower denoms are ready to roll, this being the second stage.....then raising of the rate right?

Pretty handy to be having a country tiff while they are moving along up the financial stage. Which I might also add they started their applications to join WTO in 2004. Sound familar? YUP that was when the bigger plan I think was put in motion. Very calculative I might add.

Anyway my two cents.....its getting exciting, and that in itself is very sweet.

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th_smiley_two_thumbs_up.gifth_smiley_two_thumbs_up.gifth_smiley_two_thumbs_up.gif

I cant bring snap shot but to compare last night to today.

following the same as your today shot.

iqd 1170.000 1168

EUR1494.207 1493.460

GBP1793.3761792.479

CAD 1142.020 1141.449

CHF 1235.872 1235.254

SEK 169.229 169.145

NOK 194.230 194.132

DKK 200.927 200.827

JPY 15.236 15.229

This was recorded last night I have snap shot of last night cbi website.

compare with today.

Some reason i did not capture your snap shot of today cbi web site.

My point it has nothing to do with the USD.

Edited by kid4dinar

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When a currency is pegged to another currency, it rides the coat tails of their economy....

In other words, any change in the value of the USD directly affects the market for them because if it goes down - it requires more USD to purchase imports & if it goes up it will require less USD for imports.

A fluctuating USD that is volatile is a bad deal for them because domestic markets likely have a set price to follow..

I.e., if a business owners orders X amount of inventory by importing it (& paying USD) and sets the value X for it on the shelves...

If a business wishes to continue selling for the value of X, the business will make or lose money based upon when they pay for their next round of shipment.

Does this make sense? No? I'll further clarify using simple numbers.

Business owners by cases of soda drinks... They buy 1,000 cans at $0.50 each.

This would mean that the store owner has to pay $500 for the 1,000 cans.

But, lets say that the suppliers is out of Europe & accepts $500 in cash payment due to the current exchange rate.

But, the USD drops in value which may make the next shipment cost $505, or the value goes up & the next shipment costs $495..

Considering how globally accepted the USD is, it is normally a safe bet to peg your currency to it.

Think of how the price at the pump varies directly with the current market price of crude... It also varies when the dollar gains or loses value.

Theoretically, we reached $150/barrel back in 2008 (Summer season). We were nearly pushing $4 (if not over) at some points.

We now hover at $3.20 at the pump while market price hovers around $100/barrel

Simple math would show you that we're over paying for crude per 2008 pricing. (Ideally, at $100/barrel, in 2008 it was likely around $2.50 per gallon, give or take).

The problem with that the U.S. started printing money to boost the economy, bail out big corporations, and so forth.

By selling bonds, printing money, and so forth, our money supply got expanded decreasing its value.

So, some prices may feel like they've never really changed, but goods such as crude & food (for imports) have gone up. The value of crude & food imports tends to stay the same.

So a good indicator to see how much devalued our currency is becoming is when the market value is remaining the same for crude and the cost at the pump is on the rise...

With all that said, I would argue it is not fluctuations in the USD that made the most recent change.

If you look at current events, you will see that neighboring countries are being flooded with USD.

Domestic currencies of iran & syria are crashing. This is causing a high demand for USD...

Many neighboring regions are cashing out their IQD for USD, not just the locals within the country.

I would think this is having an effect the market and tools were used..

3 years, the rate has remained the same, and it is awesome to see movement. Lets hope the moving trend continues.

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Just in case it goes away...

med_gallery_44751_730_84226.jpg

I cant bring snap shot but to compare last night to today.

following the same as your today shot.

iqd 1170.000 1168

EUR1494.207 1493.460

GBP1793.3761792.479

CAD 1142.020 1141.449

CHF 1235.872 1235.254

SEK 169.229 169.145

NOK 194.230 194.132

DKK 200.927 200.827

JPY 15.236 15.229

This was recorded last night I have snap shot of last night cbi website.

compare with today.

Some reason i did not capture your snap shot of today cbi web site.

My point it has nothing to do with the USD

Read more: http://dinarvets.com/forums/index.php?/user/19713-kid4dinar/#ixzz1jpxcWeib

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The conspiracy theorist part of my brain is seeing some events unfold...

Here is a big what if!

What if! the U.S. sent USD to the CBI to distribute to locals and neighboring regions. It is no secret that some citizens of iran are not happy with their government. What if! They're trying to use an economic warfare type tool to crash their economy to a certain degree with the USD being the weapon? What if! They're trying to create revolt to spread democracy? What if! They're attempting to do this purely for the idea that neighboring regions hold IQD and they're trying to reduce their holdings as MUCH as possible.

Look at how this would simply play out.

Iran revolts, overthrows govt (Egypt style), and a new govt is set in place. Iraq helps them form a democracy and they strengthen trade & relations.

IQD is out of the neighboring regions reducing liabilities to the CBI

Now, all IQD is held by speculators & those locally who continue to use it in domestic market.

Money supply reduced, neighboring nation threat reduced, democracy spread to neighboring regions, giving Iraq the head-start economy wise which leads them to being the prominent nation of that region.

End results, heightened demand for IQD which pushes or remains the value as it is traded locally for goods...

Now, with better ties w/ a more democratic Iran, they'll do better in terms of oil deals & trading in USD.

US wins by remaining crude sales on the market with US. Another country to buy bonds via USD, etc.

Just thinking out loud.. I accept criticism :)

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When a currency is pegged to another currency, it rides the coat tails of their economy....

In other words, any change in the value of the USD directly affects the market for them because if it goes down - it requires more USD to purchase imports & if it goes up it will require less USD for imports.

A fluctuating USD that is volatile is a bad deal for them because domestic markets likely have a set price to follow..

I.e., if a business owners orders X amount of inventory by importing it (& paying USD) and sets the value X for it on the shelves...

If a business wishes to continue selling for the value of X, the business will make or lose money based upon when they pay for their next round of shipment.

Does this make sense? No? I'll further clarify using simple numbers.

Business owners by cases of soda drinks... They buy 1,000 cans at $0.50 each.

This would mean that the store owner has to pay $500 for the 1,000 cans.

But, lets say that the suppliers is out of Europe & accepts $500 in cash payment due to the current exchange rate.

But, the USD drops in value which may make the next shipment cost $505, or the value goes up & the next shipment costs $495..

Considering how globally accepted the USD is, it is normally a safe bet to peg your currency to it.

Think of how the price at the pump varies directly with the current market price of crude... It also varies when the dollar gains or loses value.

Theoretically, we reached $150/barrel back in 2008 (Summer season). We were nearly pushing $4 (if not over) at some points.

We now hover at $3.20 at the pump while market price hovers around $100/barrel

Simple math would show you that we're over paying for crude per 2008 pricing. (Ideally, at $100/barrel, in 2008 it was likely around $2.50 per gallon, give or take).

The problem with that the U.S. started printing money to boost the economy, bail out big corporations, and so forth.

By selling bonds, printing money, and so forth, our money supply got expanded decreasing its value.

So, some prices may feel like they've never really changed, but goods such as crude & food (for imports) have gone up. The value of crude & food imports tends to stay the same.

So a good indicator to see how much devalued our currency is becoming is when the market value is remaining the same for crude and the cost at the pump is on the rise...

With all that said, I would argue it is not fluctuations in the USD that made the most recent change.

If you look at current events, you will see that neighboring countries are being flooded with USD.

Domestic currencies of iran & syria are crashing. This is causing a high demand for USD...

Many neighboring regions are cashing out their IQD for USD, not just the locals within the country.

I would think this is having an effect the market and tools were used..

3 years, the rate has remained the same, and it is awesome to see movement. Lets hope the moving trend continues.

Excellent post Darin! This statement says it all: "The problem with that the U.S. started printing money to boost the economy, bail out big corporations, and so forth.

By selling bonds, printing money, and so forth, our money supply got expanded decreasing its value." This is what all these freaking liberals and Obama supporters (one in the same) dont get. They believe the BS about the greedy & evil Oil companies and corporations in general. Its amazing how ignorant people are to the facts.

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When a currency is pegged to another currency, it rides the coat tails of their economy....

In other words, any change in the value of the USD directly affects the market for them because if it goes down - it requires more USD to purchase imports & if it goes up it will require less USD for imports.

A fluctuating USD that is volatile is a bad deal for them because domestic markets likely have a set price to follow..

I.e., if a business owners orders X amount of inventory by importing it (& paying USD) and sets the value X for it on the shelves...

If a business wishes to continue selling for the value of X, the business will make or lose money based upon when they pay for their next round of shipment.

Does this make sense? No? I'll further clarify using simple numbers.

Business owners by cases of soda drinks... They buy 1,000 cans at $0.50 each.

This would mean that the store owner has to pay $500 for the 1,000 cans.

But, lets say that the suppliers is out of Europe & accepts $500 in cash payment due to the current exchange rate.

But, the USD drops in value which may make the next shipment cost $505, or the value goes up & the next shipment costs $495..

Considering how globally accepted the USD is, it is normally a safe bet to peg your currency to it.

Think of how the price at the pump varies directly with the current market price of crude... It also varies when the dollar gains or loses value.

Theoretically, we reached $150/barrel back in 2008 (Summer season). We were nearly pushing $4 (if not over) at some points.

We now hover at $3.20 at the pump while market price hovers around $100/barrel

Simple math would show you that we're over paying for crude per 2008 pricing. (Ideally, at $100/barrel, in 2008 it was likely around $2.50 per gallon, give or take).

The problem with that the U.S. started printing money to boost the economy, bail out big corporations, and so forth.

By selling bonds, printing money, and so forth, our money supply got expanded decreasing its value.

So, some prices may feel like they've never really changed, but goods such as crude & food (for imports) have gone up. The value of crude & food imports tends to stay the same.

So a good indicator to see how much devalued our currency is becoming is when the market value is remaining the same for crude and the cost at the pump is on the rise...

With all that said, I would argue it is not fluctuations in the USD that made the most recent change.

If you look at current events, you will see that neighboring countries are being flooded with USD.

Domestic currencies of iran & syria are crashing. This is causing a high demand for USD...

Many neighboring regions are cashing out their IQD for USD, not just the locals within the country.

I would think this is having an effect the market and tools were used..

3 years, the rate has remained the same, and it is awesome to see movement. Lets hope the moving trend continues.

Thank you so much that was a awsome summery of things and one that is so easy to understand thanks for the time you spent to type this up for people like me who have a hard time understanding all of this and the way it works . :)

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