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bostonangler

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About bostonangler

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  1. Nicely said. Like having the ability to question your government... Ahhh, that's how America started. By questioning the British government. Like it or not, patriots don't live by one man's ideals... Mr. Trump needs to go back and read our history. We don't want a king. B/A
  2. Thank you, Mr. President. Donald Trump’s comments about bitcoin and the other cryptocurrencies on Thursday were right on target. He’s right: Their value is “based on thin air.” Your typical cryptocurrency is basically a “frequent flyers” program, only without any airline attached. You hope someone will accept your “miles” for something real. But there’s no guarantee. He’s right: They are ”highly volatile.” In the past two years bitcoin BTCUSD, -3.31% has gone from $19,000 to $3,200 and back up to $11,000 and change. He’s right: They can “facilitate unlawful behavior.” I’d argue that’s their main use. And he’s right: If Facebook FB, +0.10% wants to launch its own currency, it should seek a banking charter. The president made his comments after palling around with techies at a “social media” summit at the White House. (His glowing references to the U.S. dollar — “...stronger than ever... by far the most dominant currency anywhere in the World...” — also suggest that Larry “King Dollar” Kudlow, his chief economic adviser, has been whispering recently in his ear.) They come as another cryptocurrency bubble, or mania, threatens to reinflate. Bitcoin has trebled so far this year, and is back above $10,000. Cryptocurrencies are like a virus that won’t die. They keep metastasizing. There are still more than 2,000 cryptocurrencies in existence, and their theoretical total value is about $318 billion — more than the value of Procter & Gamble PG, +0.35% , and only slightly less than that of Exxon Mobil XOM, -0.32% . I know which I’d rather own. Cryptocurrencies are a pure gamble with no discernible fundamentals whatsoever. The cryptocurrency “markets” are rife with fraud, scams and manipulation. I’d love them if I were a con artist. Have fun. But you are better off wagering your money at the race track: At least there you can see the horses. Cryptocurrency fans were cheering Trump’s comments on Thursday, because their market feeds on attention. Trump caused a brief — very brief — spike in the price of Bitcoin. But they can’t contradict a single one of his arguments. He’s right. He’s so right, his comments are truisms. It was Ohio State coach Woody Hayes who said allegedly that when a quarterback throws a pass, only three things can happen, “and two of them are bad.” But cryptocurrencies are even worse. When cryptocurrencies boom, only two things can happen, and both of them are bad. The first is that they can boom, and then they can crash — at which point you find that lots of ordinary retail investors have been hosed, in dotcom style, by insiders. Plenty of that happened in 2017. Some of the cases are now making their way through the courts. That’s bad. The second is that cryptocurrencies can boom, and then NOT crash. If that happens, congratulations: You’ve just helped create a shadow currency system that can be used worldwide by terrorists, extortionists, drug dealers, child pornographers, hit men, and anyone else who doesn’t want to go through the regular banking system. That’s even worse than the first outcome. Some of the biggest fans of cryptocurrency: Hackers who use ransomware to extort money from hospitals, municipalities and others. The global WannaCry ransomware attack of 2017 helped put Bitcoin on the map. Yes, by all means let’s make that even easier, shall we? Cheerleaders for cryptocurrencies like to present themselves as noble, heroic champions of monetary “freedom.” Digital currencies will “democratize” money, break up power structures, “decentralize” the world, and so on. It’s all nonsense. Anarchy doesn’t help the weak, it helps the powerful. It doesn’t serve the interests of the honorable, but of the ruthless. Read up on the Dark Ages, folks. Read up on the Wild West. The naive who rail against regulation and big government need to study more about what the world was like before these terrible, terrible things came along. In some parts of the crypto cult, there’s more than a whiff of paranoia about banks and “international financial interests.” Cue: Illuminati, Elders of Zion, the Rothchilds, Federal Reserve, and so on. (How ironic, incidentally, that Trump was happy to pander to those people during his election campaign) But one aspect of bitcoin isn’t often talked about. It isn’t really forward-looking. It’s incredibly retro. Bitcoin is tight money. There’s only a limited supply of bitcoins . The number in existence cannot be expanded by much, and only very slowly. And we’ve seen this movie before. Tight money helped cause the Great Depression of the 1930s and probably the previous great depression of the 1870s. Tight money helped make the European debt crisis much worse. Money is a medium of exchange. If there isn’t enough of it to go around, the economy simply slows down. Tight money — once based on gold — was a disastrous financial superstition. Actually, the current debate in finance is about how loose you can make money. Modern Monetary Theory argues, in effect, that you can pretty much loosen it all you want. That may be the other extreme. But at least it makes money the servant of the economy, not the other way around. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/donald-trump-is-right-about-bitcoin-2019-07-12?siteid=yhoof2&yptr=yahoo
  3. You realize all of these comments go against the very foundation of American principles. Since when do we extradite people for disagreeing? Do we really want a country that is against the freedom to speak one's mind? Do you realize every one of those congresswoman are American citizens. What's next, you're a Catholic so get out? How about, you don't believe in God get out? Or maybe, you are wearing Nike sneakers so get out? People making these comments and supporting these ideals need to get out... I bet you don't like that idea... B/A
  4. I remember watching that as a kid... It was simply amazing. B/A
  5. Thank you, Mr. President. Donald Trump’s comments about bitcoin and the other cryptocurrencies on Thursday were right on target. He’s right: Their value is “based on thin air.” Your typical cryptocurrency is basically a “frequent flyers” program, only without any airline attached. You hope someone will accept your “miles” for something real. But there’s no guarantee. He’s right: They are ”highly volatile.” In the past two years bitcoin BTCUSD, -3.39% has gone from $19,000 to $3,200 and back up to $11,000 and change. And he’s right: If Facebook FB, -0.03% wants to launch its own currency, it should seek a banking charter. The president made his comments after palling around with techies at a “social media” summit at the White House. (His glowing references to the U.S. dollar — “...stronger than ever... by far the most dominant currency anywhere in the World...” — also suggest that Larry “King Dollar” Kudlow, his chief economic adviser, has been whispering recently in his ear.) They come as another cryptocurrency bubble, or mania, threatens to reinflate. Bitcoin has trebled so far this year, and is back above $10,000. Cryptocurrencies are like a virus that won’t die. They keep metastasizing. There are still more than 2,000 cryptocurrencies in existence, and their theoretical total value is about $318 billion — more than the value of Procter & Gamble PG, +0.43% , and only slightly less than that of Exxon Mobil XOM, -0.12% . I know which I’d rather own. Cryptocurrencies are a pure gamble with no discernible fundamentals whatsoever. The cryptocurrency “markets” are rife with fraud, scams and manipulation. I’d love them if I were a con artist. Have fun. But you are better off wagering your money at the race track: At least there you can see the horses. Cryptocurrency fans were cheering Trump’s comments on Thursday, because their market feeds on attention. Trump caused a brief — very brief — spike in the price of Bitcoin. But they can’t contradict a single one of his arguments. He’s right. He’s so right, his comments are truisms. It was Ohio State coach Woody Hayes who said allegedly that when a quarterback throws a pass, only three things can happen, “and two of them are bad.” But cryptocurrencies are even worse. When cryptocurrencies boom, only two things can happen, and both of them are bad. The first is that they can boom, and then they can crash — at which point you find that lots of ordinary retail investors have been hosed, in dotcom style, by insiders. Plenty of that happened in 2017. Some of the cases are now making their way through the courts. That’s bad. The second is that cryptocurrencies can boom, and then NOT crash. If that happens, congratulations: You’ve just helped create a shadow currency system that can be used worldwide by terrorists, extortionists, drug dealers, child pornographers, hit men, and anyone else who doesn’t want to go through the regular banking system. That’s even worse than the first outcome. Some of the biggest fans of cryptocurrency: Hackers who use ransomware to extort money from hospitals, municipalities and others. The global WannaCry ransomware attack of 2017 helped put Bitcoin on the map. Yes, by all means let’s make that even easier, shall we? Cheerleaders for cryptocurrencies like to present themselves as noble, heroic champions of monetary “freedom.” Digital currencies will “democratize” money, break up power structures, “decentralize” the world, and so on. It’s all nonsense. Anarchy doesn’t help the weak, it helps the powerful. It doesn’t serve the interests of the honorable, but of the ruthless. Read up on the Dark Ages, folks. Read up on the Wild West. The naive who rail against regulation and big government need to study more about what the world was like before these terrible, terrible things came along. In some parts of the crypto cult, there’s more than a whiff of paranoia about banks and “international financial interests.” Cue: Illuminati, Elders of Zion, the Rothchilds, Federal Reserve, and so on. (How ironic, incidentally, that Trump was happy to pander to those people during his election campaign) But one aspect of bitcoin isn’t often talked about. It isn’t really forward-looking. It’s incredibly retro. Bitcoin is tight money. There’s only a limited supply of bitcoins . The number in existence cannot be expanded by much, and only very slowly. And we’ve seen this movie before. Tight money helped cause the Great Depression of the 1930s and probably the previous great depression of the 1870s. Tight money helped make the European debt crisis much worse. Money is a medium of exchange. If there isn’t enough of it to go around, the economy simply slows down. Tight money — once based on gold — was a disastrous financial superstition. Actually, the current debate in finance is about how loose you can make money. Modern Monetary Theory argues, in effect, that you can pretty much loosen it all you want. That may be the other extreme. But at least it makes money the servant of the economy, not the other way around. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/donald-trump-is-right-about-bitcoin-2019-07-12?siteid=yhoof2&yptr=yahoo B/A
  6. Bitcoin Tumbles as Trump Critique Tests Stellar Run for 2019 (Bloomberg) -- Bitcoin slumped briefly below $10,000 on Monday, following another weekend sell-off that saw some digital tokens plunge by more than 20%. The largest cryptocurrency fell as much as 17% from Friday before paring its drop to 11% at $10,571 as of 11:50 a.m. in New York, according to Bloomberg composite pricing. Other highly traded coins also retreated: Ethereum declined 17% and Litecoin fell 13%. The tumble comes days after U.S. President Donald Trump criticized digital coins on the heels of this year’s stellar rally. Trump wrote on Twitter on Thursday that he is “not a fan of Bitcoin and other Cryptocurrencies, which are not money, and whose value is highly volatile and based on thin air,” adding that “Unregulated Crypto Assets can facilitate unlawful behavior, including drug trade and other illegal activity.” Read about weekends as the “Wild West” for Bitcoin. Bitcoin “continues to trade lower as comments from President Trump put downward pressure on the cryptocurrency,” said Alfonso Esparza, senior market analyst at Oanda Corp. in Toronto. Drawing Trump’s ire means “it could fall further to $8,000, giving back all the gains made in June.” Bitcoin initially climbed after Trump’s comments, but has since more than erased the gains. Technical indicators were ominous, too. The GTI Vera Convergence Divergence indicator, which detects positive and negative trends, flashed a sell signal as Bitcoin hovered around $10,000. Though it remains the key support line for the coin, a sustained break below that threshold could signal further losses ahead. The last time the indicator flashed a sell signal -- in early June -- Bitcoin dropped about 10% over the subsequent two trading sessions https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/bitcoin-tumbles-trumps-critique-tests-233323153.html B/A
  7. A new study from the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) claims cryptocurrencies are being used by U.S. adversaries to circumvent the nation’s geopolitical supremacy. The report—published the same day that President Trump slammed Bitcoin on Twitter—focuses on Venezuela, China, Iran, and Russia, the four countries that are either subject to or most at risk of U.S. sanctions. Venezuela has already launched a national crypto and China recently accelerated its plans to do the same. Russia, meanwhile, is piloting multiple blockchain projects, seeking to develop a strategic advantage, and—on Saturday—Iran unveiled plans for a gold-backed cryptocurrency. The FDD study warns that a national digital currency issued by any these nations—particularly one tied to a major commodity, such as oil—may make sanctions much harder to enforce. Washington, it said, needs to “cultivate the expertise and influence to lead in what is becoming an international crypto race.” China, says the report—while locked in a trade war with America, is currently not subject to sanctions—poses the biggest threat. It’s the most technologically advanced of the U.S. adversaries, has the biggest economy and influence on world trade. It’s piloting blockchain technology, and a national cryptocurrency could compete with the dollar-based financial system. “China’s buy-in, if it involved moving its trade onto a blockchain platform outside the conventional system, would be a game-changer,” said the report. But the study also cautions against other—more clandestine—approaches U.S. foes could adopt. These include creating a digital currency wallet infrastructure that allows residents to hold and trade crypto and use it for local transactions, or building significant reserves in a widely adopted cryptocurrency, and using these to gain more influence in the global financial system. Telegram fever: the crypto messenger shaking up the world While Russia’s plans for its own crypto are purely under consideration, or so it claims, there are already suggestions that Russia is sidestepping U.S. sanctions by investing in bitcoin. Statements made by Vladimir Putin, while not referencing bitcoin directly, suggest that, as Russian dollar assets decrease as a result of U.S. sanctions,“the world will look for alternative savings and transaction methods.” And analysts have highlighted an increase in over-the-counter trading of Bitcoin in Russia—where large quantities are traded, bypassing official exchanges. Meanwhile, the fresh details about Iran’s plans for a gold-backed cryptocurrency reveal that it will be mined by a small consortium of private Iranian tech companies. Shahab Javanmardi, CEO of FANAP, an Iranian IT firm, also revealed that the new crypto will utilize Iran’s supplies of cheap electricity to “ease optimal use of Iranian banks’ frozen resources.” The acting head of Iran’s Trade Promotion Organization has also claimed that “Iran is negotiating the use of cryptocurrency in its financial transactions with Austria, Bosnia, Britain, France, Germany, Russia, South Africa, and Switzerland to “circumvent U.S.-led sanctions.” Venezuela is, to date, the only country to have issued a cryptocurrency, albeit one that has been derided by both the country’s citizens and international trading partners. However the report warned that the experiment is being used as “a valuable case study for other regimes to learn what not to do in deploying a blockchain sanctions resistance plan.” The U.S., says the report, is at risk of being blindsided as the American financial sector has fewer short-term plans to build out the new types of money transfer systems that are being developed by its adversaries. “Technology has created a potential pathway to alternative financial value transfer systems outside of U.S. control,” said the report. “The target timeline may be two to three decades, but these actors are developing the building blocks now.” https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/u-foes-weaponizing-cryptocurrency-says-150457249.html B/A
  8. At least 2,500 truck drivers have lost their jobs in 2019 as the transportation 'bloodbath' unfolds — here's the full list of bankrupt trucking companies Six trucking companies have folded in 2019. That's left more than 2,500 truck drivers unemployed. After a hugely profitable year in 2018, this year has seen retailers and manufacturers moving less, according to the Cass Freight Index. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Truck drivers are suffering in 2019 — especially those who own or work at small businesses. Rates in the spot market, where retailers and manufacturers buy trucking capacity as they need it, rather than through a contract, sank by around 18% year-over-year. That's caused truckers like Demetrius Wilburn, a Georgia-based driver, to find themselves unemployed. Wilburn bought his semi-truck four years ago after years of working as a company truck driver. But, due to rock-bottom rates, Wilburn wasn't able to make a payment one month — and they repossessed his truck. "I was only 6 months away from paying it off," Wilburn told Business Insider. "I'm trying to transition back into law enforcement now — don't want to ever drive trucks again. Definitely not worth it." Read more: The pilots who fly your Amazon packages were getting paid way below industry standards. Then they started calling in sick with little notice. Lexington, Kentucky-based owner-operator Chad Boblett told Business Insider that some truck drivers are seeing a "bloodbath" in just how low rates are. Here are the trucking companies that have gone bankrupt in 2019, and how many truckers who are now out of a job. We used the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's company snapshot tool to measure how many truck drivers worked at each company. Are you a truck driver who has been suffering in 2019 from low rates? Contact the reporter at rpremack@businessinsider.com. Starlite Trucking — 28 truck drivers David McNew/Getty Images Starlite Trucking, which was in business for 40 years, announced on July 12 that the company was closing down. The company was based in Ceres, California — about 100 miles southeast of San Francisco — and mostly hauled livestock feed, nuts, and other products for the agricultural region. CEO Colby Bell said in a statement on Facebook that the rising compliance costs of California regulations gutted the company — particularly as rates have stagnated. Read more: 'I don't know how long I can stay in business': Truckers' fears have soared to recession-level highs "We tried to provide a healthy work environment for our employees and give them the best wages and benefits we could, but in the end, the rates that were available did not support the cost structure needed to compensate our employees appropriately," Bell said. A.L.A. Trucking — 32 truck drivers David Goldman/AP Effective June 26, Anderson, Indiana-based trucking company A.L.A. Trucking Inc. shut down after 31 years in operation. Along with 15 other employees, 41 truckers with A.L.A. lost their jobs. Williams Trucking — 48 truck drivers Scott Olson/Getty Images Alabama-based Williams Trucking abruptly shut down on May 1, telling its employees to finish up deliveries, bring their trucks back to the headquarters, and go home. LME — 424 truck drivers Workday Minnesota/YouTube On July 12, LME posted on its website that it was no longer accepting loads and was shutting down immediately. The company employed more than 400 truck drivers. Read more: Who developed the Boeing 737 Max's flawed software? Low-paid temp workers and recent college grads, according to report Based in New Brighton, Minnesota, LME was a less-than-truckload (LTL) trucking company in the US. LTL is a type of trucking where multiple shippers share a truck space to ship packages. Last month, a federal judge ordered the owners of LME to pay out $1.25 million to its former employees. LME's owners ran a trucking company called Lakeville Motor Express that abruptly shuttered in 2016, leaving nearly 100 workers without back pay. Falcon Transport — 585 truck drivers WKBN27/YouTube More than 550 truck drivers at Youngstown, Ohio-based Falcon Transport learned in late April that their employer was going under — effectively immediately. CounterPoint Capital Partners, a Los Angeles-based investment firm, bought the 116-year-old company in 2017. CounterPoint has not stated why it shut down Falcon. However, some speculate that the end of Youngstown's General Motors plant, which shuttered in March, contributed to Falcon's closure. "It was like a bolt of lightning on a clear day and I wasn't expecting that," Falcon trucker Ed McCormick told WKBN, the local Youngstown CBS affiliate. New England Motor Freight — 1,472 truck drivers Timmy Shigley/YouTube On Feb. 12, New England Motor Freight "stunned" the rest of the industry when it announced it was filing for bankruptcy and shutting down operations. NEMF generated $402 million in revenue in 2017, ranking it as the 19th-largest less-than-truckload (LTL) trucking company in the US. LTL is a type of trucking where multiple shippers share a truck space to ship packages. It employed more than 1,300 truck drivers. Read more: A top trucking company just declared bankruptcy — and Amazon may have helped usher its downfall Thomas Connery, president and COO of NEMF, told Business Insider that high labor costs and other costs of business in the trucking industry were the leading reasons for the company's bankruptcy filing. "Excessive regulation, significant toll increases, and the high cost of insurance were also among contributing factors," Connery said. https://www.yahoo.com/news/least-2-500-truck-drivers-152550919.html Here's an idea..... Trump Trucking!!! LOL B/A
  9. LOL... Only LGD thinks I'm a woman... You guys shouldn't believe everything you hear... B/A
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