Guest views are now limited to 12 pages. If you get an "Error" message, just sign in! If you need to create an account, click here.

Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
umbertino

November 2019 Election News

Recommended Posts

Democrats' double victory in Virginia deals blow to Trump

 

State house and senate in Democratic hands, while Kentucky governor vote too close to call

 

Josh Wood and agencies

Wed 6 Nov 2019 10.15 GMT

 

 

Vid

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/nov/05/kentucky-governor-race-andy-beshear-matt-bevin

  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Democrat claims victory in Kentucky governor's race

Christopher Wilson  Senior Writer  Yahoo NewsNovember 5, 2019
 
 
 
yahooNews-315505-1573041729884.jpg
Scroll back up to restore default view.

Democrat Andy Beshear claimed victory in the Kentucky governor’s race, with a margin of about 5,000 votes over Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, in a state won by President Trump by 30 points in 2016.

Three hours after the polls closed, Bevin had not conceded, and there were reports he might seek a recount. 

The election was largely a referendum on Bevin’s unpopular plan to roll back Medicaid expansion, and his attacks on the state’s teachers. But Bevin also tied himself to the president, who held a rally for him in Lexington Monday night along with Kentucky’s two Republican senators, Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul. Trump, addressing the crowd, said, “If you lose, it sends a really bad message. … You can’t let that happen to me.”

Beshear, the state attorney general, rolled up large margins in the suburbs while improving on recent Democratic numbers in parts of coal country.

Bevin is unpopular in the state, with a 53 percent disapproval rating, the second-lowest of any governor but an improvement from polling earlier this year that had him even lower. He had been antagonistic toward teacherstelling an interviewer last year that children left at home were being sexually assaulted and trying drugs while some schools shut down for a protest at the capital. A number of Republicans endorsed Beshear, including one of Bevin’s Republican primary opponents

One of the dividing lines in the race was health care: Beshear’s father, Steve, was Bevin’s predecessor in the governor’s mansion and expanded Medicaid. Bevin has attempted to undo that expansion, requesting a waiver from the White House to impose work requirements that the younger Beshear opposed. Bevin’s plan was blocked by a federal judge, but an estimated 95,000 people would lose health care if the change went through. 

In his election night speech, Beshear said preserving Medicaid expansion, protecting public-employee pensions and investing in public schools would be his priorities.

If Beshear wins, it will prove that you can’t mess with people’s pensions, call them thugs, and threaten to take away their healthcare in the same year,” wrote Lexington Herald-Leader columnist Linda Blackford in her preview of the race.

While Bevin lost, Republicans won the race for state attorney general for the first time since the 1940s, with Daniel Cameron winning over 57 percent of the vote. Cameron will be the state’s first African-American attorney general.

President Trump and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin at a campaign rally in Lexington, Ky., on Monday. (Photo: Timothy D. Easley/AP)
President Trump and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin at a campaign rally in Lexington, Ky., on Monday. (Photo: Timothy D. Easley/AP)

“Now he is difficult, I have to say, maybe it costs him the election, but it’s OK,” Trump said of Bevin at Monday’s rally. “When he needs something for Kentucky like money, like aid, he wants me to call one of the many manufacturers now that are coming into Kentucky, ‘Could you call the head of some company in Japan, please?’ I say, ‘Matt, do I have to?’ ‘Please, please.’ But isn’t that what you really want in a governor? That’s what you want. He’s such a pain in the ass, but that’s what you want.”

The Trump campaign continued to push for Bevin on Twitter.

“Fantastic being in the Great State of Kentucky last night,” wrote Trump. “Vote for Matt Bevin NOW! @MattBevin One of Best Governors in U.S. He will never let you down!”

“Big numbers to help @MattBevin win four more years as the governor of Kentucky!” Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted following the rally.

While Bevin tried to nationalize the race, frequently bringing up his support for Trump, Beshear steered clear of impeachment, only telling the New York Times, “I would like to see more of any proceedings happen in the public” when asked about the House inquiry. When asked if he thought Trump was a good man, Beshear said, “I don’t know the president” and said he would work with him if it helped Kentucky.

In his interview with the Times, Bevin predicted an easy night.

“I’d say 6 to 10 percent,” said the governor, predicting his margin of victory, adding, “I think you’re going to be shocked at how uncompetitive this actually is.”

 

https://news.yahoo.com/andy-beshear-victory-kentucky-governor-matt-bevin-trump-032539959.html

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Thanks 3
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Democrats win full control of Virginia statehouse

Associated PressNovember 6, 2019

 
 
yahooNews-315514-1573042514539.jpg
Scroll back up to restore default view.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) -- Virginia Democrats continued their winning streak under President Trump on Tuesday and took full control of the statehouse for the first time in more than two decades.

Suburban voters turned out in big numbers to back Democratic candidates, continuing a trend of once GOP-friendly suburbs turning blue. This is the third election in a row in which Democrats made significant gains since Trump was elected.

"I'm here to officially declare today, November 5, 2019, that Virginia is officially blue," Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam told a crowd of supporters in Richmond.

Of the four states with legislative elections this year, Virginia is the only one where control of the statehouse was up for grabs. Republicans had slim majorities in both the state House and Senate.

National groups, particularly those aligned with Democrats, pumped huge amounts of money into the contests as a way to test-drive expensive messaging and get-out-the-vote campaigns ahead of the 2020 cycle. Gun control and clean-energy groups affiliated with former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg spent several million dollars helping Democrats.

Virginia also drew several high-profile visits from 2020 presidential hopefuls, including former Vice President Joe Biden, as well as current Vice President Mike Pence.

President Donald Trump tried to rally Republicans via Twitter but stayed out of Virginia, a state he lost in 2016.

The only candidate Trump endorsed by name, Republican Geary Higgins, was handily defeated in a contest for a northern Virginia Senate district that was previously held by the GOP.

The president's election three years ago has been disastrous for Virginia Republicans, particularly in growing suburban areas. Democrats have won every statewide contest, picked up three additional congressional seats and now are set to control both the state house and the Executive Mansion for the first time since 1994.

Republicans hoped in vain that an off-year election with no statewide candidates on the ballot would help defuse the anti-Trump energy that powered previous cycles. GOP lawmakers also bet on the specter of a possible Trump impeachment providing a last-minute surge by motivating the Republican base.

Democrats have pledged that when they take power, they will pass an agenda that Republicans have blocked for years, including stricter gun laws, a higher minimum wage and ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment, making Virginia the final state needed for possible passage of the gender equality measure.

Democrats were keenly focused on gun issues during the election, saying Republicans should be held accountable for failing to pass new restrictions after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach earlier this year.

Republicans accused Democrats of trying to use the tragedy for political gain while focusing heavily on past Democratic efforts to loosen restrictions for third-trimester abortion. The GOP also warned of higher taxes and energy prices if they lose the majority.

House Majority Leader Todd Gilbert on Tuesday predicted that Democrats would pursue an "extreme agenda" that would undo Republican efforts to make Virginia a business-friendly state.

"Virginians should expect public policies that look a lot more like the train-wreck that is California than the Virginia of good fiscal management and common-sense conservative governance," Gilbert said in a statement.

Tuesday's election could help cement Democratic rule for the next decade, because the winners will decide who controls the next redistricting process. Lawmakers approved a proposed constitutional amendment this year that would create a new bipartisan commission empowered to draw legislative and congressional maps, but Democrats would have to sign off on it again next year before it could be presented to voters.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/virginia-voters-cast-ballots-marquee-052210932.html

 

GO RV, then BV

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cyclist who flipped off US president wins local election

78abb930-0250-11e9-bd79-c2df2cb885d1
AFPNovember 6, 2019
48 Comments
 
 
  • Juli Briskman, whose one-handed salute was captured by an AFP photographer, has beaten the Republican incumbent to a seat on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors (AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski)
  • Juli Briskman was fired after a snapshot of her flipping the bird to the presidential motorcade went viral in 2017 (AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski)
  • President Donald Trump's party has lost control of both chambers of the legislature in increasingly blue Virginia, US media projected (AFP Photo/MANDEL NGAN)
 
1 / 3

Juli Briskman, whose one-handed salute was captured by an AFP photographer, has beaten the Republican incumbent to a seat on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors

 

Washington (AFP) - A cyclist who was fired after flipping the bird -- making a rude single-fingered gesture -- to US President Donald Trump's motorcade has been elected to local office in Virginia.

Juli Briskman, whose one-handed salute was captured in an AFP photograph that went viral, beat the Republican incumbent to a seat on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors in state elections that saw Trump's Republican party suffer a series of stinging defeats.

The single mother of two teens lost her job as a marketing analyst for a United States government and military subcontractor after the snapshot of her gesture spread across media and the internet in 2017, bringing her insults and threats.

But getting fired also opened "a lot of doors", the 52-year-old told AFP during her campaign, including accepting an invitation to run for local office on the Democratic ticket.

That decision paid off on Tuesday night, as Briskman celebrated her victory in a tweet that linked to a copy of the image.

"Looking forward to representing my friends & neighbors in #Algonkian District who backed me up today! So proud that we were able to #FlipLoudpun," she wrote.

With 52 percent of the vote after 99 percent of precincts had reported, the result saw Republican Suzanne Volpe beaten into second place.

When fighting her campaign in Loudoun County -- the wealthiest in the US -- Briskman didn't bring up the image that sparked her 15 minutes of fame unless homeowners started "talking about the administration" or commented on her bicycle pin.

Instead, the ultramarathon runner told AFP she wanted to show that there was "substance" behind her candidacy -- education, women's rights, transportation and environmental issues -- and that she wasn't "just the person that rode my bike one day and flipped off the president."

Her success comes as Trump's party also lost control of both chambers of the legislature in increasingly blue Virginia, US media including The New York Times projected.

Democrats will now hold all major statewide offices and rule the state assembly, a comprehensive consolidation of power not seen in the state since the 1990s.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/cyclist-flipped-off-us-president-wins-local-election-083411218.html

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
News

Don Jr. Distances Dad From Kentucky Governor’s Race: ‘This Has Nothing to Do With Trump’

a76e9ca0-ba9f-11e7-afbd-e700b0f36d78_daily_beast.png
The Daily BeastNovember 6, 2019
 
 
243a729fed15fa90eea89d9c4ff21b49

With the Democratic gubernatorial candidate holding the lead in ruby red Kentucky late on Tuesday night, presidential scion Donald Trump Jr. and Fox News host Laura Ingraham absolved President Trump of any blame for incumbent Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s potential loss.

Noting that only a few thousand votes separated Bevin from challenger Andy Beshear and the Associated Press had yet to call the race, Ingraham took issue with other cable news networks tying the results to the president, who held a big campaign rally for Bevin on the eve of the election and literally said his own fate was tied up with that of Bevin's in the race.

“Bevin was the most unpopular governor in the country,” Ingraham said during her Fox program Tuesday night. “Once down 20 points, now it’s still too close to call, 49 percent versus 49 percent.”

After Ingraham placed the blame for the apparent GOP defeat squarely on Bevin’s shoulders, Trump Jr. followed suit while also crediting his father for other Republican victories in the state.

“They don’t mention Trump helped propel those guys to those places,” he exclaimed. “Yes, I like Matt Bevin, he’s been a friend of mine, he’s a good guy, but he has picked a lot of battles and he’s teed off on a lot of people in Kentucky, that’s not always popular, we understand how that works.” 

After saying he would have loved to see a Republican win the governor’s seat, Trump Jr. went on to further distance his father from the race.

“This has nothing to do with Trump,” he declared. “They swept the rest of the ticket, did great in Mississippi, et cetera, et cetera.”

The president’s son did not bring up the state races in Virginia, where Democrats took over the state legislature. 

Towards the end of her show, Ingraham would remind Fox News viewers that Bevin was highly unpopular and Trump was the only reason the race was as close as it was.

“Trump comes into town, and Trump gets this thing tied up at 49-49,” she asserted. “That’s who brought the race this close. If Trump hadn’t come into town, I can tell you what would have happened. This race would probably have been a ten-point race for the Democrats.”

The Trump campaign, meanwhile, released a statement late Tuesday evening praising the president for Republicans winning other Kentucky state offices while personally crediting him for Bevin’s close race.

“The President just about dragged Gov. Matt Bevin across the finish line, helping him run stronger than expected in what turned into a very close race at the end,” Trump 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale said. “A final outcome remains to be seen.”

 

https://news.yahoo.com/don-jr-distances-dad-kentucky-051214728.html

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Thanks 2
  • Haha 1
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
News

A Bevin-Beshear recount? Here's what could happen in the Kentucky governor's race

1b8d34c0-ffe6-11e8-9efb-906719b9955b
USA TODAYNovember 6, 2019
 
 
cd33a36d15deea2da4b1724210e22dc6
 
A Bevin-Beshear recount? Here's what could happen in the Kentucky governor's race
More

LOUISVILLE – To cap off one of the wildest finishes to a gubernatorial election in Kentucky history, Democratic candidate Andy Beshear declared victory to supporters Tuesday night, moments after Republican incumbent Matt Bevin told supporters that he will not concede the race.

"This is a close, close race," said Bevin, who trailed Beshear by 5,189 votes with 100% of precincts reporting across the state. "We are not conceding this race by any stretch."

Later that night, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes told CNN her office had called the race for Beshear, as they do not believe the difference in the vote can be made up by Bevin.

As if matters couldn't get more complicated, Republican Senate President Robert Stivers then told reporters that a joint session of the Kentucky General Assembly may eventually decide the winner, citing a provision in the state constitution that hasn't been used in 120 years.

So ... what now?

Will there be a recanvass, recount of Kentucky governor's race votes?

Bevin said he "wanted the process to be followed" under law before he made a concession, referring to unspecified "irregularities" that were "corroborated."

The first step in that process under Kentucky law, when it comes to election results that are contested, should be as familiar to Bevin as anyone else in the state, as he won a razor-thin victory in the Republican gubernatorial primary of 2015 by margin of just 83 votes over now Rep. James Comer.

The first step under Kentucky law is a recanvass of the vote, which is a review of the vote totals by each county clerk — counting absentee votes and checking printouts to make sure the numbers they transmitted to the State Board of Elections were correct.

More Election 2019 coverage: Dems take control of Virginia statehouse; Mississippi governorship stays in GOP hands

Governor's race: Twitter weighs in on Beshear's (maybe) win over Bevin in Kentucky governor's race

State law allows for a recanvassing if a county clerk or a county board of elections notices a discrepancy, or if a candidate makes a written request to the secretary of state.

Comer requested a recanvass of the vote totals in that 2015 race, but the results were unchanged. He declined to request the next possible step in the process under Kentucky law — a formal recount that includes a physical examination of the ballots.

There is no provision for an automatic recount under Kentucky law. A candidate must file a petition with the Franklin Circuit Court by the Tuesday following the election.

If petitioned, the judge would take possession of the paper ballots and voting machines and conduct their own recount. After doing so, the judge would make the final decision on who won the race, but that would be subject to appeal to the Kentucky Court of Appeals or the Kentucky Supreme Court.

Joshua Douglas, a professor in the University of Kentucky Law School, told The Courier Journal that while Bevin would not be charged for the costs of a recanvass should he want one, he would have to pay for a recount.

More: Election takeaways: What we learned from Kentucky, Virginia, and Mississippi

What it means to formally contest an election

The third step that a candidate could take is a formal election contest, which must also be filed by the Tuesday after the election. Under this contest, the candidate challenging the results must specify the grounds for the action, such as a violation of campaign finance rules or specific problems when it comes to how ballots were cast.

Last but not least, there is Section 90 of the state constitution, which addresses a "contest of election for Governor or Lieutenant Governor."

Section 90 states: "Contested elections for Governor and Lieutenant Governor shall be determined by both Houses of the General Assembly, according to such regulations as may be established by law."

Read more: A recount in the Kentucky governor's race would be uncharted territory, but it's possible

Sam Marcosson, a constitutional law professor at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, told The Courier Journal that this language of the state Constitution suggests there must be procedure established by law for a review of a contested election to take place by the House and Senate.

“They can’t just make them up,” Marcosson said.

Further, he said, such a review would be extremely risky for lawmakers to undertake without clear reasons for a contested election.

“If the House and Senate were just to proceed on vague allegations without proof, that raises serious questions about disenfranchisement of the voters who voted for Attorney General Beshear,” Marcosson said. “It’s an extraordinary proposition to suggest that the General Assembly would take vague allegations of unspecified irregularities and call into question a gubernatorial election.”

Douglas, noting that he had “no idea” what irregularities Bevin referred to in his speech to supporters Tuesday night, said in the case of a legislative election contest, Bevin would have to call a special session of the General Assembly. Douglas said his session would involve a committee of 11 members, eight from the House and three from the Senate, which “would hear evidence and make a final determination. And that determination would be final.”

After that committee decision, no lawsuits could be filed over the decision, Douglas added.

When will the new Kentucky governor be sworn into office? 

For now, Bevin hasn't specified what action he will take, and neither has Stivers or House Speaker David Osborne.

Until then, Kentuckians will wait with bated breath as they wonder who their governor will be for the next four years and how long it will that to determine that victor.

Whatever step is taken, they do have to act somewhat quickly. The Kentucky constitution requires that a governor be sworn into office on the fifth Tuesday after an election, which would be Dec. 10.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/bevin-beshear-recount-heres-could-053650750.html

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even the Trump flipper won an election....seems all it takes to win in Virginia is to hate Trump......if you recall....the top 3 leaders in the State...all Dems had some issues.....racial....sexual abuse.......and it didn't matter....so Virginia is unique....and a very Blue State......

 

https://images.app.goo.gl/CdLgSut8Lts3h9i7A

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
News

Republican Lt. Gov. Reeves wins Mississippi governor's race

Associated PressNovember 6, 2019
 
 
  • Howell Garner, a Ridgeland, Miss., precinct manager, right, offers a prayer prior to opening the doors to voters, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. Registered voters are having their say in Mississippi's most hotly contested governor's race since 2003 and are also selecting six other statewide officials as well as deciding a host of legislative and local offices. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
  • Fran McNeill, and others can study the candidates and races as they wait for the Ridgeland, Miss., precinct to open its doors, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. Registered voters are having their say in Mississippi's most hotly contested governor's race since 2003 and are also selecting six other statewide officials and deciding a host of legislative and local offices. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
  • Republican nominee for governor and current Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, electronically signs the voters' register before voting, Tuesday Nov. 5, 2019 in Flowood, Miss. Voters are having their say in Mississippi's most hotly contested governor's race since 2003. They are also selecting six other statewide officials and deciding a host of legislative and local offices. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
 
1 / 9

Election 2019 Mississippi

Howell Garner, a Ridgeland, Miss., precinct manager, right, offers a prayer prior to opening the doors to voters, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. Registered voters are having their say in Mississippi's most hotly contested governor's race since 2003 and are also selecting six other statewide officials as well as deciding a host of legislative and local offices. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
 
More

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Republicans are keeping their hold on the governorship in Mississippi, despite facing the best-funded Democrat to run for the position in more than a decade.

Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves on Tuesday defeated Democratic Attorney General Jim Hood and two candidates who ran low-budget campaigns.

Reeves will succeed Gov. Phil Bryant, who is limited by state law to two terms.

"I want to be the governor for all Mississippians and I'm going to work hard every day to do that," Reeves told The Associated Press after his victory.

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both traveled to Mississippi in recent days to campaign for Reeves, who is completing his second term as lieutenant governor after serving two terms as the elected state treasurer.

"President Trump's rally and endorsement in Mississippi undoubtedly had an impact and helped Governor-elect Tate Reeves nail down his victory," Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement. "Governor Reeves will be a tremendous conservative leader for Mississippians in fighting for freedom and keeping taxes low."

Trump also congratulated Reeves, tweeting: "Great going Tate!"

Reeves, 45, campaigned on keeping taxes low and limiting government regulation of businesses. He also said that a vote for Hood is akin to a vote for "liberal" national Democrats, including U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Hood, 57, is finishing his fourth term as attorney general. For three of those terms, he has been the only Democrat holding statewide office in Mississippi.

Hood was district attorney before winning statewide office, and he told supporters at a party late Tuesday that "the good Lord" has allowed him to serve the people of Mississippi.

"I guess it was not his will that we continue on as governor," Hood said.

Hood's high-profile gubernatorial race came four years after the party's nominee was Robert Gray, a long-haul truck driver who didn't vote for himself in the primary, raised little money and lost the general election by a wide margin.

Hood this year campaigned on improving schools and highways and on expanding Medicaid to the working poor. Expansion is an option under the federal health overhaul signed into law in 2010 by then-President Barack Obama. Mississippi is among the 14 states that have not expanded Medicaid, a decision that Hood said has cost the state $1 billion a year in federal money.

Hood did not invite national Democratic figures to the state to campaign for him in person, but Obama recorded a call that went to some Mississippi residents Monday, urging people to vote for Hood.

Republicans have been governor in Mississippi for 24 of the last 28 years. The last Democratic governor, Ronnie Musgrove, lost in 2003 as he sought a second term.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/dem-aims-governorship-largely-republican-050727273.html

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, coorslite21 said:

Even the Trump flipper won an election....seems all it takes to win in Virginia is to hate Trump......if you recall....the top 3 leaders in the State...all Dems had some issues.....racial....sexual abuse.......and it didn't matter....so Virginia is unique....and a very Blue State......

 

https://images.app.goo.gl/CdLgSut8Lts3h9i7A

 

"racial"...."sexual abuse".....sounds to me like those Dems you speak of, and Trump, have a lot in common.  

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Haha 4
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

"racial"...."sexual abuse".....sounds to me like those Dems you speak of, and Trump, have a lot in common.  

 

GO RV, then BV

 

Yes......career......American Politician......very noble endeavour....   CL

 

https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2019/02/07/virginia-dems-politics-jason-carroll-newday-vpx.cnn

 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bostonangler said:

 

Who is exiting Virginia?

 

B/A

 

Who is exiting California and New York......and why......?

 

Only seems logical to me Virginia will be next.....

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, coorslite21 said:

 

Who is exiting California and New York......and why......?

 

Only seems logical to me Virginia will be next.....

 

I don't know who is exiting any of those? Do you mean retirees?

 

B/A

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roughly 5 million people left California in the last decade. 

By Phillip Reese - preese@sacbee.com

An unprecedented number of Californians left for other states during the last decade, according to new tax return data from the Internal Revenue Service.

About 5 million Californians left between 2004 and 2013. Roughly 3.9 million people came here from other states during that period, for a net population loss of more than 1 million people.

The trend resulted in a net loss of about $26 billion in annual income.

About 600,000 California residents left for Texas, which drew more Californians than any other state. Roughly 350,000 people came from Texas to California.

The housing boom, recession and housing bust, which hit California harder than most states, likely played a role in the trend. The greatest net population losses occurred during the housing boom, the IRS data show, when many Californians were priced out of the market. The subsequent recession saw many people lose their homes and jobs and go to states with lower unemployment. Conservative analyst and Hoover Institute Fellow Carson Bruno also blames the state's high cost of living and tax structure.

Based on tax returns, the IRS migration data is considered the gold standard for measuring population shifts, though it lags two to three years behind the current date. The latest, separate estimates from the state Department of Finance showed net domestic migration losses slowing, but not ending, in 2014.

Despite the loss of residents to other states, California continued to grow during the last decade because of natural increase - more births than deaths - and foreign migration.

This graphic shows the number of people who came to and left California from each state during the last decade.

 

And

 

https://nypost.com/2019/01/19/why-more-people-are-leaving-new-york-than-any-other-state/

 

 

 

 
 
Edited by coorslite21
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“President Trump’s rally helped five of six Kentucky Republicans win clear statewide victories, including Attorney General-elect Daniel Cameron, who will be the first black A.G. in Kentucky history and the first Republican to hold the office since 1948," Brad Parscale, Trump's 2020 campaign manager, said in statement to Fox News late Tuesday. "The President just about dragged Gov. Matt Bevin across the finish line, helping him run stronger than expected in what turned into a very close race at the end. A final outcome remains to be seen.”

  • Thanks 2
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, bostonangler said:

 

I don't know who is exiting any of those? Do you mean retirees?

 

B/A

 

CL is right, as far as people leaving California.....many lefties to deep red Texas, in fact.   :D

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, learning all i can said:

isn't  Virginia the one that was bought and paid for by Soros.  Money truely is the root of all evil.....

 

And yet Republicans thought it best to elect a "billionaire".  :blink:

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Haha 3
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, coorslite21 said:

About 5 million Californians left between 2004 and 2013. Roughly 3.9 million people came here from other states during that period, for a net population loss of more than 1 million people.

 

So the net change is about 1 million... The title of the article could be construed as a little misleading.

 

B/A

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, bostonangler said:

Yeah because we want America to mimic Mississippi...

 

B/A

I'm from Mississippi and I'd rather be that than an unscrupulous, immoral internet troll. 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

And yet Republicans thought it best to elect a "billionaire".  :blink:

 

GO RV, then BV

You sure are proud of your parties election fraud. 

 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

I'm from Mississippi and I'd rather be that than an unscrupulous, immoral internet troll.

 

Are you calling me names again? I've spent time in Mississippi, and it a bit behind the curve...

 

B/A

  • Thanks 1
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

 

You sure are proud of your parties election fraud. 

 

Oh, it's the old election fraud nugget....a Republican staple.  :rolleyes: 

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still have limited neg capabilities brother?.....asking for a friend.  :lol:  I can certainly understand the Right feeling a little raw this morning.

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.