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usndiver

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  1. Apples and golf balls. Neither effects the other. Zimbabwe, well.... the name speaks for itself. Check out this glowing fact sheet. https://www.heritage.org/index/country/zimbabwe
  2. https://www.americasfrontlinedoctors.com/how-do-i-get-covid-19-medication/ American Front Line Doctors i have my supply of meds, if I need it. I do everything natural anyway and have been exposed multiple times to C19 positive people and have yet to get sick. DON’T BELIEVE THE BS!
  3. One guess on who placed it. Here’s a clue, four letters. Starts with an I and ends with an N.
  4. Just an FYI folks. The USS Georgia carries more than missiles, nuclear and conventional. She also is outfitted to deploy Navy SEAL's. That "tubular section, just behind the sail can carry an SDV (SEAL Delivery Vehicle).
  5. If you want to keep your gains then you need to look into the OSI program.
  6. Oil Prices Crash as Storage Shortage Looms 139 Hussein Malla/AP Photo John Carney 20 Apr 2020792 2:12 The joke among oil traders Monday morning is that gas stations will soon be paying customers to fill up their tanks as the search for storage options intensifies. Oil prices plunged on Monday to multi-decade lows. The front-month May contract for West Texas Intermediate futures, which expires Tuesday, fell by more than 36 percent to $11.55 a barrel. Soon to be expiring contracts are typically traded in lower volumes. Som\e traders may be selling the expiring May contract for fear that storing oil will become more expensive as high production numbers clash with low demand around the globe. The June WTI contract for West Texas Intermediate futures, fell by more than 11.5 percent. Brent crude oil, considered the global benchmark, fell by around 6 percent. Analysts are concerned that the capacity for storing oil may run out soon. The storage facility in Cushing, Oklahoma has become a particular focus. Connected by pipeline to Canada, West Texas, the Gulf Coast, and the American Midwest, Cushing is where the physical delivery of most WTI takes place. That end-stage of billions of dollars of daily trading, most of it purely financial and settled with contracts, is becoming more expensive as crude stockpiles have accumulated. Efforts to curb production, such as a recent agreement between Russian and Saudi Arabia, appear to have fallen short. When prices for futures contracts expiring further out are higher than contracts expiring sooner, traders describe the market as being in “contango.” The opposite, where near-term contracts are cheaper than long-term, is called “backwardation.” The current market, with a steep discount for oil available for near-term delivery, is known as “super-contang0.” The definitions of those terms may not matter to most consumers but they are fun to say. “Uncontained contango,” is a new phrase being thrown around to describe super-contango driven by lack of storage capacity. https://www.breitbart.com/economy/2020/04/20/oil-price-crash/
  7. Russia's stronger economy lets Putin stare down OPEC By Natasha Doff and Anya Andrianova on 3/8/2020 MOSCOW (Bloomberg) --Vladimir Putin’s resistance to further output cuts has pushed Russia’s accord with the OPEC cartel that controls more than half of the world’s oil production toward breakdown. Some key metrics guiding the Russian economy help explain the president’s reasoning. “Thanks to Russia taking harsh measures earlier, Russia can now afford a lower oil price than five to six years ago,” said Dmitry Dolgin, chief economist at ING Bank in Moscow. Five years of austerity and safeguarding assets against the threat of U.S. sanctions have left Russia in a stronger position than ever before to cope with lower oil prices. Putin’s plans to increase spending this year can go ahead regardless and a weaker ruble will only help the country’s commodity exporters, which sell their goods in dollars. Russia resisted pressure from allies in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to make deeper production cuts at negotiations in Vienna that ended without a deal on Friday, saying it favors maintaining supply reductions at current levels until June. Saudi Arabia, the other major player in the OPEC+ talks, is pushing for a group cut of 1.5 million barrels a day. International sanctions forced Russia to strip back foreign borrowing in recent years, while stringent fiscal policies pared domestic spending to a minimum. The result is that Russia now boasts the fourth-biggest international reserves in the world, and some of the lowest debt levels. Putin’s new government still has plenty of room to start increasing spending this year even if oil prices drop closer toward $40 a barrel. Gone are the days when Russia needed oil prices of over $100 a barrel to balance its budget. A combination of spending cuts and revenue increases pursued since the 2015 oil price crash has pushed the break-even point for the budget down to $51 a barrel. Though oil prices breached that level earlier this month, the Finance Ministry can afford to take in a bit less given that the budget ran a surplus in the last two years. Compared to other oil-exporting nations, Russia is in very good shape to cope with lower prices. Saudi Arabia, for instance, balances its budget at oil prices roughly double the level that Russia can cope with. The ruble is down close to 10% so far this year, compared with a nearly 30% plunge for Brent crude, implying that the Russian currency is still overvalued. In the past the Kremlin has been content to keep the currency weak to boost revenues of commodity exporters, the driving force of the economy. Bloomberg Economics’s Scott Johnson warns though that a blow to the ruble could “undermine domestic demand just when more external shocks are on the way.” https://www.worldoil.com/news/2020/3/6/russias-stronger-economy-lets-putin-stare-down-opec
  8. Huff post, now there’s an outlet with integrity. 😂 Dare we mention how much the eight year President Obama apology world tour cost? I really don’t care where any POTUS travels to for down time. It’s a thankless job regardless of party affiliation.
  9. Marty McFly: Time circuits on... Flux Capacitor... fluxing... Engine running... All right!
  10. Well, since this thread is off topic I’ll throw this into the mix. It’s been awhile since SNL put something out that was funny! Enjoy!
  11. How about you all keep the political rhetoric in the Opinions section. It’s bad enough that we are inundated with politics by every form of media out there. Most of us are here for IQD news. Thanks for your consideration in this.
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