Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Maliki's coalition is moving to Washington to extend the life of the government


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
10 replies to this topic

#1 TBomb

TBomb

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 5,365 posts


Posted 21 July 2013 - 04:36 PM

Maliki's coalition is moving to Washington to extend the life of the government

07/21/2013 20:52:41

The future of Iraq / special sources parliamentary prominent, on Sunday, about the movement of a coalition of law towards America to persuade them to extend the life of the current government due to the differences and conflict unspoken (behind the scenes) between the political blocs on the system «St. Lego» electoral shares changing composition of local governments and thus the reins out of the hands of Maliki's coalition. The sources for the future of Iraq »The efforts of a coalition of nations law changing the electoral system mentioned before the date of the next parliamentary elections has become a dream pink, especially since small blocks will not vote in favor of the abolition of« St. Lego »because it is in their interest. The sources ruled out changing the «Saint Lego» because it gave great service to the blocks small during the recent local elections through the fragmentation of components and large missed opportunity for a coalition of state law in particular and the component Shiite generally achieve better results than achieved now for the formation of local governments, indicating that Maliki's coalition will step to maneuver as a result of not changing the current electoral system. The sources pointed out that «the maneuver coalition of state law include extending the life of the current government a year or two, revealing contacts with America in this regard in order to ensure the approval of the Obama administration to give the green light for the masses to accept this resolution, likely that there will be concessions and book signing will be given to Washington return for agreeing to this project.
  
- See more at: http://www.almustakb...h.IaUwh60c.dpuf


Edited by TBomb, 21 July 2013 - 04:38 PM.

  • 0

#2 uncirculd

uncirculd

    Walking Liberty Lady

  • Members
  • 8,193 posts
  • LocationGone


Posted 22 July 2013 - 08:00 AM

I dont know about st lego, must be some hefty building blocks, but I do know that maliki has nerve.  Aint no way to keep that current proxy government.    This guy really thinks he is invincible and that the rest of us are stupid.  I am tired of him trying to insult everybody's intelligence with his ignorance. 


  • 0

#3 Butifldrm

Butifldrm

    Member

  • Members
  • 7,250 posts
  • LocationTexas


Posted 22 July 2013 - 08:23 AM

The reason Maliki wants to change the election law is very simple,  He and his cronies got their butt kicked, because of St Lego.  His parties are no longer the majority.  

 

Iraqi Religious Leaders Nix 
Maliki's Electoral Plans Maliki.jpg?t=thumbnail_578
Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki speaks during the opening ceremony of the Defense University for Military Studies inside Baghdad's Green Zone, June 17, 2012. (photo by REUTERS/Thaier al-Sudani)
 
 

  

    

   email.png

 
 

 

By: Adnan Hussein for Al-Monitor Iraq Pulse Posted on July 21.

<a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.al-monito...uthorities.html" href="http://www.al-monito...uthorities.html" target="_blank" title="Click here to read the original article from" alt="Click here to read the original article from style=" color:darkblue;"="">

The dreams that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki had to remain in his post for a third term are likely to have completely vanished, just like the dreams of his State of Law coalition, which is seeking to remain a large bloc in parliament to bargain over influential positions in the next government.

The development that settled the matter in this direction is the position of the Shiite authorities in Najaf, which have explicitly announced that they oppose the electoral system that Maliki and his coalition want to adopt in the parliamentary elections scheduled for early next year. Maliki and his coalition want to abolish the so-called "Saint Lego" system, which was adopted in the last provincial elections, to return to the closed-list system, deemed by the Federal Court as unconstitutional.

The Federal Court ruled in 2010 that the closed-list system — adopted in the parliamentary elections of that year — is an invalid system because it violates the provisions of the 2005 constitution, since it does not achieve equality among various members of society.

The ruling came after a case was filed by two of the candidates running for those elections to challenge the closed-list electoral system. In the close-list system, each entity participating in the elections submits a list of candidates, and people vote for the entire list, not for each candidate separately. If a list loses, the votes it received get added to the balance of the winning lists, in accordance with the percentage of votes each received. In other words, this system allows the winning blocs to get the votes of those who lost, in order to have a bigger share within the parliament. The system allows the heads of lists to distribute the votes to the candidates of their choice. Because of this system, candidates who only got a few hundred or a few thousand votes reached parliament, as they got their votes from the losing lists through the heads of their lists.

Instead of this system, the “Saint Lego” system was chosen to be applied in the last provincial elections, a system that prevents winning lists from getting the votes of the losing candidates. The State of Law coalition achieved very modest results in the provincial elections, and instead of admitting that the reason behind this poor performance was the mismanagement of the Maliki government over the past three years, Maliki and his coalition leaders put the blame on the Saint Lego system.

They announced that they would not accept its application in the next parliamentary elections, and sought to persuade large blocs to adopt the same position. However, civil forces, leftist groups, intellectuals and journalists considered that the “Saint Lego” system gives voters the freedom to elect their representatives and achieve justice in the distribution of seats. They started a campaign to preserve this system, and they were joined by the Ahrar parliamentary bloc (affiliated with the Sadrist Movement) and the Citizen’s Coalition (Ammar al-Hakim) — both Shiite — along with the Kurdistan Alliance. These blocs are seeking to prevent Maliki and his coalition from monopolizing the government once again.

Until a few days ago, Maliki's coalition was still clinging to its position, but on Friday, July 12, the Friday preacher in Karbala, who usually speaks on behalf of the highest religious authority Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, declared that Najaf does not support the return to the closed-list system, an announcement that crushes the dreams of Maliki and his coalition. This coalition finds it difficult to explicitly oppose the position of this authority, which automatically empowered the position of Maliki's opponents, who are opposed to the closed-list system.

Read more: http://www.al-monito...l#ixzz2ZmgfLmDm


Edited by Butifldrm, 22 July 2013 - 08:24 AM.

  • 1

#4 cooked

cooked

    Another Tequilla sunrise.

  • Members
  • 3,423 posts
  • LocationNew Joisey exit 4

Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:43 AM

Does this mean we are going to have car bombs and stuff here too? Great.
  • 2
Just another day in paradise.

#5 MahiMahi

MahiMahi

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 406 posts
  • LocationFL

Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:50 AM

The reason Maliki wants to change the election law is very simple,  He and his cronies got their butt kicked, because of St Lego.  His parties are no longer the majority.  

 

Iraqi Religious Leaders Nix 
Maliki's Electoral Plans Maliki.jpg?t=thumbnail_578
Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki speaks during the opening ceremony of the Defense University for Military Studies inside Baghdad's Green Zone, June 17, 2012. (photo by REUTERS/Thaier al-Sudani)
 
 

  

    

   email.png

 
 

 

By: Adnan Hussein for Al-Monitor Iraq Pulse Posted on July 21.

<a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.al-monito...uthorities.html" href="http://www.al-monito...uthorities.html" target="_blank" title="Click here to read the original article from" alt="Click here to read the original article from style=" color:darkblue;"="">

The dreams that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki had to remain in his post for a third term are likely to have completely vanished, just like the dreams of his State of Law coalition, which is seeking to remain a large bloc in parliament to bargain over influential positions in the next government.

The development that settled the matter in this direction is the position of the Shiite authorities in Najaf, which have explicitly announced that they oppose the electoral system that Maliki and his coalition want to adopt in the parliamentary elections scheduled for early next year. Maliki and his coalition want to abolish the so-called "Saint Lego" system, which was adopted in the last provincial elections, to return to the closed-list system, deemed by the Federal Court as unconstitutional.

The Federal Court ruled in 2010 that the closed-list system — adopted in the parliamentary elections of that year — is an invalid system because it violates the provisions of the 2005 constitution, since it does not achieve equality among various members of society.

The ruling came after a case was filed by two of the candidates running for those elections to challenge the closed-list electoral system. In the close-list system, each entity participating in the elections submits a list of candidates, and people vote for the entire list, not for each candidate separately. If a list loses, the votes it received get added to the balance of the winning lists, in accordance with the percentage of votes each received. In other words, this system allows the winning blocs to get the votes of those who lost, in order to have a bigger share within the parliament. The system allows the heads of lists to distribute the votes to the candidates of their choice. Because of this system, candidates who only got a few hundred or a few thousand votes reached parliament, as they got their votes from the losing lists through the heads of their lists.

Instead of this system, the “Saint Lego” system was chosen to be applied in the last provincial elections, a system that prevents winning lists from getting the votes of the losing candidates. The State of Law coalition achieved very modest results in the provincial elections, and instead of admitting that the reason behind this poor performance was the mismanagement of the Maliki government over the past three years, Maliki and his coalition leaders put the blame on the Saint Lego system.

They announced that they would not accept its application in the next parliamentary elections, and sought to persuade large blocs to adopt the same position. However, civil forces, leftist groups, intellectuals and journalists considered that the “Saint Lego” system gives voters the freedom to elect their representatives and achieve justice in the distribution of seats. They started a campaign to preserve this system, and they were joined by the Ahrar parliamentary bloc (affiliated with the Sadrist Movement) and the Citizen’s Coalition (Ammar al-Hakim) — both Shiite — along with the Kurdistan Alliance. These blocs are seeking to prevent Maliki and his coalition from monopolizing the government once again.

Until a few days ago, Maliki's coalition was still clinging to its position, but on Friday, July 12, the Friday preacher in Karbala, who usually speaks on behalf of the highest religious authority Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, declared that Najaf does not support the return to the closed-list system, an announcement that crushes the dreams of Maliki and his coalition. This coalition finds it difficult to explicitly oppose the position of this authority, which automatically empowered the position of Maliki's opponents, who are opposed to the closed-list system.

Read more: http://www.al-monito...l#ixzz2ZmgfLmDm

not sure why you got negged, but i evened you out!


  • 1

#6 Carrello

Carrello

    Carrello the KamelKeeper

  • Members
  • 7,159 posts

Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:30 AM

Did I hear someone say the US has no influence over Iraq?  Hello...


  • 0

#7 zigmeister

zigmeister

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 8,270 posts


Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:39 AM

Did I hear someone say the US has no influence over Iraq?  Hello...

bada bing babeee!


  • 0

#8 uncirculd

uncirculd

    Walking Liberty Lady

  • Members
  • 8,193 posts
  • LocationGone


Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:14 PM

Carrello, you go girl.  

 

Thanks Butifldrm,  your so right.   He sure did, but he actually thinks he could run a 3rd term and he don't get it that he won't win.  He's trying to get immunity.  


  • 1

#9 Carrello

Carrello

    Carrello the KamelKeeper

  • Members
  • 7,159 posts

Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:34 PM

Hey Uncirculd, how are you?  You look fabulous!


  • 0

#10 sandfly

sandfly

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 18,677 posts
  • Locationafghanistan

Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:31 AM

NOW THEY NEED US


  • 0

#11 SgtFuryUSCZ

SgtFuryUSCZ

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 10,543 posts

Posted 23 July 2013 - 01:49 AM

***///

 

This cat has great big giant hairy camel cojones asking US for ANYTHING since

 

climbing into bed with nuclear Iran & Russia.

 

We hope the Iraqi people do to him what we & they did to that Saddam Statue.

 

Git a rope.....


Edited by SgtFuryUSCZ, 23 July 2013 - 01:50 AM.

  • -1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

  • Privacy Policy