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rv2016

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  1. - 50 million to sell - Crisp, Uncirculated - 100,000 Banknotes - $50 per million - If interested email: ojbook@yahoo.com
  2. Iran's Financial Activities Won't Be Heavily Affected by New US Sanctions - CBI 10.05.2018 MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The new US sanctions will not have a major effect on Iran's financial and oil activity, Iranian Central Bank Governor said Friday. "The US government has already done what it wanted. The main work related to the imposition of restrictions, what they do every day, is to hinder Iran’s financial activities and the exports of Iranian oil. In my opinion, after November 6-9, nothing special will happen," Iranian Central Bank (CBI) Governor Abdolnaser Hemmati told Sputnik. Hemmati also noted that Iran expected to increase the share of transactions in national currencies in trade with Russia stressing that following the meeting with Russian Central Bank Governor Elvira Nabiullina, "a good agreement on removing the dollar and using national currencies in transactions" have been reached. "Nearly 30 percent of transactions between Iran and Russia are made in national currencies. Hopefully [this figure] will grow every day," the CBI governor said. The first batch of economic restrictions, which include a ban on purchasing the US currency, trading in gold and other precious metals, buying aluminum and steel for industrial purposes, and performing activities related to Iran's sovereign debt, took effect on August 7. The second portion, including sanctions on Iran's energy sector and foreign transactions, will come into force in November. Earlier this year, the United States withdrew from the Iranian nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), and reimposed sanctions against Tehran and any country doing business with Iranian companies. https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201810051068628286-us-sanctions-iran-oil/
  3. Iran's Financial Activities Won't Be Heavily Affected by New US Sanctions - CBI 10.05.2018 MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The new US sanctions will not have a major effect on Iran's financial and oil activity, Iranian Central Bank Governor said Friday. "The US government has already done what it wanted. The main work related to the imposition of restrictions, what they do every day, is to hinder Iran’s financial activities and the exports of Iranian oil. In my opinion, after November 6-9, nothing special will happen," Iranian Central Bank (CBI) Governor Abdolnaser Hemmati told Sputnik. Hemmati also noted that Iran expected to increase the share of transactions in national currencies in trade with Russia stressing that following the meeting with Russian Central Bank Governor Elvira Nabiullina, "a good agreement on removing the dollar and using national currencies in transactions" have been reached. "Nearly 30 percent of transactions between Iran and Russia are made in national currencies. Hopefully [this figure] will grow every day," the CBI governor said. The first batch of economic restrictions, which include a ban on purchasing the US currency, trading in gold and other precious metals, buying aluminum and steel for industrial purposes, and performing activities related to Iran's sovereign debt, took effect on August 7. The second portion, including sanctions on Iran's energy sector and foreign transactions, will come into force in November. Earlier this year, the United States withdrew from the Iranian nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), and reimposed sanctions against Tehran and any country doing business with Iranian companies. https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201810051068628286-us-sanctions-iran-oil/
  4. Parliament approves Iran’s accession to CFT October 7, 2018 MNA – Iranian lawmakers approved a bill on the country’s accession to Combating the Financing of Terrorism (CFT) standards set by the FATF (Financial Action Task Force), after reviewing the comments of opponents and supporters on Sunday open session. Reportedly, out of 276 MPs present in the meeting, a total of 143 lawmakers voted in favor of the bill while 120 voted against it. Five MPs also abstained. Parliament’s open session on Sunday morning was attended by Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani, Acting Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance Seyyed Rahmatollah Akrami, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Intelligence Minister Seyyed Mahmoud Alavi, Governor of Central Bank of Iran (CBI) Abdolnaser Hemmati, Vice-President for Legal Affairs Laya Joneydi, Deputy Foreign Minister for Political Affairs Abbas Araghchi and Spokesman for the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Behrouz Kamalvandi. The session covered hearing of the comments of opponents and supporters of the bill on the Iran’s accession to Combating the Financing of Terrorism (CFT). Behrooz Nemati, the spokesman for presiding board of Iran’s Parliament, who was among the supporters of the bill, said the government has so far implemented 40 recommendations by FATF. He stressed that necessary measures should be taken so as not to give the enemy any excuse for misconduct, noting, “if we do not accept the convention, we have actually done nothing” in this regard. Referring to the accession of the CFT by over 188 countries with their own terms and conditions, Nemati reiterated that joining the convention would remove any excuse and rights for enemies to meddle with our affairs. https://theiranproject.com/blog/2018/10/07/parliament-approves-irans-accession-to-cft/
  5. Parliament approves Iran’s accession to CFT October 7, 2018 MNA – Iranian lawmakers approved a bill on the country’s accession to Combating the Financing of Terrorism (CFT) standards set by the FATF (Financial Action Task Force), after reviewing the comments of opponents and supporters on Sunday open session. Reportedly, out of 276 MPs present in the meeting, a total of 143 lawmakers voted in favor of the bill while 120 voted against it. Five MPs also abstained. Parliament’s open session on Sunday morning was attended by Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani, Acting Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance Seyyed Rahmatollah Akrami, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Intelligence Minister Seyyed Mahmoud Alavi, Governor of Central Bank of Iran (CBI) Abdolnaser Hemmati, Vice-President for Legal Affairs Laya Joneydi, Deputy Foreign Minister for Political Affairs Abbas Araghchi and Spokesman for the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Behrouz Kamalvandi. The session covered hearing of the comments of opponents and supporters of the bill on the Iran’s accession to Combating the Financing of Terrorism (CFT). Behrooz Nemati, the spokesman for presiding board of Iran’s Parliament, who was among the supporters of the bill, said the government has so far implemented 40 recommendations by FATF. He stressed that necessary measures should be taken so as not to give the enemy any excuse for misconduct, noting, “if we do not accept the convention, we have actually done nothing” in this regard. Referring to the accession of the CFT by over 188 countries with their own terms and conditions, Nemati reiterated that joining the convention would remove any excuse and rights for enemies to meddle with our affairs. https://theiranproject.com/blog/2018/10/07/parliament-approves-irans-accession-to-cft/
  6. If someone is serious about buying all 100 million Iranian Rial make me a offer by email: ojbook@yahoo.com
  7. Iran allows central bank to defend rial by intervening in forex market September 29, 2018 DUBAI, Sept 29 (Reuters) - Iran on Saturday authorised the central bank to intervene in the foreign exchange market in defence of the rial, state television reported, after the currency fell to repeated record lows in recent weeks following the reimposition of U.S. sanctions. The rial has slumped due to a weak economy, difficulties at local banks and heavy demand for dollars among Iranians who fear Washington’s withdrawal from a landmark 2015 nuclear deal and renewed U.S. sanctions could shrink Iran’s oil exports and derail its economy. A set of U.S. sanctions targeting Iran’s oil industry is due to take effect in November. President Hassan Rouhani has called the sanctions an “economic war” against Iran. A top government body, headed by Rouhani and the heads of parliament and the judiciary, “gave the central bank governor the necessary authority to intervene in the foreign exchange market and to manage it”, state TV said. “The central bank will intervene in the foreign exchange market through banks and authorised exchange shops and carry out the necessary measures to control the exchange rate of hard currencies,” the television quoted the body as saying. The central bank will “announce the rate of exchange in the foreign exchange market at an appropriate time,” the body added. It was not immediately clear whether Saturday’s announcement meant the government would return to a policy, abandoned in recent months, of injecting hard currencies into the market. The Iranian rial hit a record low on the unofficial market on Wednesday, and was offered for 186,000 rials to the dollar according to foreign exchange websites. The rial has lost approximately 75 percent of its value so far this year. On Saturday, the first trading day of the week, the rial recouped some its losses to be traded at around 174,300-174,500 per dollar, according to foreign exchange websites 2gheroon.ir and bonbast.com, which track the unofficial market. The official exchange rate is 42,000 rials per dollar and is used mostly for imports of state subsidised basic goods such as food and medicine. The top government body also gave final approval to a move allowing money exchange shops to import foreign currency banknotes, and requiring non-oil exporters to repatriate their hard cash earnings within three months to be reinvested or sold in a regulated secondary market to importers. Officials have said Iran was moving to ease regulations on imports of hard currency bills and gold by exchange shops, after Washington in August re-imposed sanctions on Iran’s purchases of dollars, its trade in gold and precious metals, and its dealings with metals, coal and some software. (Reporting by Dubai newsroom; Editing by Andrew Bolton and Alexandra Hudson) https://af.reuters.com/article/metalsNews/idAFL8N1WF0CA
  8. Europe Finally Has an Excuse to Challenge the Dollar The plan for a “special purpose vehicle” to bypass U.S. sanctions on Iran could test American dominance of the global financial system. September 25, 2018 With more and more European companies fleeing Iran following the re-imposition of U.S. sanctions, it may be tempting for Americans to write off Europe’s efforts to save the Iran nuclear deal. It would be wiser to resist the temptation. A new plan by Germany, France, Britain, China and Russia to create special financial infrastructure to work with Iran could be a credible challenge to the U.S. dollar’s long global dominance. Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s top foreign-policy official, said in New York on Monday that the plan to create a “special purpose vehicle” for trade with Iran “will mean that EU member states will set up a legal entity to facilitate legitimate financial transactions with Iran, and this will allow European companies to continue trade with Iran.” The technical details are still to be worked out, but her wording provides some useful hints on how the scheme will work. The U.S. sanctions, reimposed after President Donald Trump pulled his country out of the 2016 agreement that severely restricted the Iranian nuclear program, make it virtually impossible for an entity with any U.S. exposure — including correspondent accounts with U.S. banks — to do business with Iran. The cost of defying American sanctions can be steep: In 2015, BNP Paribas SA, the French bank, paid a penalty of almost $9 billion for violating U.S. sanctions against Iran, Cuba and Sudan. The French government’s angry protests over the “disproportional” punishment were ignored. Now sanctions are back, it is clear to the Europeans (as well as the Chinese and Russians) that any future transactions with Iran must go through entities insulated from the American financial system. In a July 2018 report, Axel Hellman of the European Leadership Network think tank and Esfandyar Batmanghelidj of the business publisher Bourse & Bazaar proposed “a new banking architecture” in response to the U.S. sanctions, relying on the existing system of “gateway banks,” such as the Hamburg-based Europaeisch-Iranische Handelsbank, and the European branches of private Iranian banks. “A further third category of gateway banks can be envisioned,” they wrote, “which would comprise of special purpose vehicles established by European governments, or as part of public-private partnerships in order to facilitate Iran trade and investment.” The new plan appears to focus on this third option. Mogherini indicated that Germany, France and the U.K. would set up a multinational state-backed financial intermediary that would deal with companies interested in Iran transactions and with Iranian counter-parties. Such transactions, presumably in euros and pounds sterling, would not be transparent to American authorities. European companies dealing with the state-owned intermediary technically might not even be in violation of the U.S. sanctions as currently written. The system would be likely be open to Russia and China as well. Europe would thus provide an infrastructure for legal, secure sanctions-busting — and a guarantee that the transactions would not be reported to American regulators. It would be pointless to sanction the special purpose vehicle because the U.S. would have no way of knowing who deals with it, and why. All the U.S. could do is sanction the participating countries’ central banks or SWIFT, the Brussels-based financial messaging system, for facilitating the transactions (if the special purpose vehicle uses SWIFT, rather than ad hoc messaging). That, Hellman and Batmanghelidj wrote, would be self-defeating: “There are two possible outcomes if these institutions proceed to work with Iran despite U.S. secondary sanctions. Either U.S. authorities fail to take enforcement action given the massive consequences for the operations and integrity of the American financial system, serving to “defang” the enforcement threats and reduce the risk of European self-sanctioning on the basis of fear, or U.S. authorities take such an enforcement action, a step that would only serve to accelerate European efforts to create a defensible banking architecture that goes beyond the Iran issue alone.” Creating “a defensible banking architecture” may well be the end goal for the Europeans, China and Russia, anyway. Iran is only a convenient pretext: The nuclear agreement is one of the few things that unite the EU, China and Russia against the U.S. But working to undermine the dollar’s global dominance isn’t ultimately about Iran at all. In his recent State of the European Union speech, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called for strengthening the euro’s international role and moving away from traditional dollar invoicing in foreign trade. China and Russia have long sought the same thing, but it’s only with Europe, home of the world’s second biggest reserve currency, that they stand a chance of challenging American dominance. Whether or not the “special purpose vehicle” would entice European companies such as France’s Total or Germany’s Daimler to get back into business with Iran remains to be seen. Given U.S. law enforcement’s wide reach, there would still be a risk involved, and European governments may not be able to protect the companies from it. Some firms will be tempted to try the new infrastructure, however, and the public isn’t likely to find out if they do. In any case, it’s worthwhile for Europe, Russia and China to experiment with dollar-free business. No currency’s international dominance has lasted forever, and there’s no reason for the U.S. dollar to be the exception to this rule. Trump’s confidence in his ability to weaponize the dollar against adversaries and stubborn allies alike could eventually backfire for the U.S. as efforts to push the dollar off its pedestal grow ever more serious. https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-09-25/europe-finally-has-an-excuse-to-challenge-the-dollar
  9. I would sell in 500k or by the million >> just email me your offer! thank you.
  10. If you are interested in selling your Iranian Rial please email me: ojbook@yahoo.com
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