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RodandStaff

NY Major bans prayer, clergy at 9/11 memorial service

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New York mayor bans prayer, clergy at 9/11 memorial service

Contact Mayor Bloomberg’s office today!

August 30, 2011

Dear Patrick,

The tenth anniversary of the Islamic jihadist attacks on New York on 9/11 will soon be upon us. Faith in God sustained millions of Americans on that day and the days that followed. Americans looked to God and to their spiritual leaders for comfort and guidance.

But New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has banned all clergy and all prayer from the upcoming 9/11 memorial service planned to commemorate the tragic events of that day.

In times of crisis, America’s political leaders have always turned to prayer. This includes FDR, who himself prayed on national radio on June 6, 1944, as our troops launched the invasion of Normandy.

It’s time that Mayor Bloomberg hears from all of us that this deliberate insult to the faith of Americans, and indeed to God himself, is inexcusable. As Rudy Washington, deputy mayor under former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, said, “This is America, and to have a memorial service where there’s no prayer, this appears to be insanity to me. I feel like America has lost its way.”

There is no direct email contact for Mayor Bloomberg but you are urged to contact him directly through the web form on his website to urge him to rescind his ban on clergy and prayer in this year’s 9/11 ceremony.

Suggested E-mail to Mayor Bloomberg

Dear Mayor Bloomberg:

It is inexcusable that clergy and prayer have been banned from the 9/11 memorial ceremony. Faith in God has sustained America in times of testing since our founding, and it is unconscionable that public expressions of trust in His wisdom and power have been banned in connection with the anniversary of the deadliest attack on Americans in our history. I urge you to reconsider and include clergy and prayer in this year’s ceremony.

Personal note: What the heck is this country coming to? dry.gif

Edited by RodandStaff
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As I commented on the Fox website regarding this article: TO ALL LIVING IN NEW YORK.. Remember this next time Bloomberg comes up for re-election.

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Printed on our own world recognized currency the almighty dollar is " In God We Trust! " Faith is woven into the fabric of our very existence as the greatest nation on earth! Iy is un-acceptable for Bloomberg to have the audacity and arrogance to attempt to ban acknowledgement of U.S. citizens' constitutional right to pray as well as their constitutional right not to pray.

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I am not surprised at all with Bergbloom's (I know it's backwords) announcment.

The man is truly lost. Given another mandate in NYC, he'll have the place back to it's crime haydays of the 70's and 80's.

If I were the glergy of NYC I'd just show up anyways and have another parallel service. I'm sure Fox News would broadcast that one for those that wanted the real thing!!

You libs out there. You will destroy the feee west with your idiocy!

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Is this being done to protect the feelings of those whose tender sensibilities make them recoil in the presence of prayer? Is it to spare the angst of agnostics who simply don't want to hear it? Or is it to protect the irresponsible, uncaring demands of those who claim they are "offended" by someone else's plea to a Higher Power? Frankly, I can't imagine a reason good enough to deny believers their comfort in God in order to protect non-believers' taboo against prayer. The world is upside down when denial of God is sacred, and prayer to God is forbidden.

I think we should think about this when we vote in the future, and that's for all officials from Obama on down to your city aldermen and councilman. (Or are they the same thing?) And I think we Christians and Jews should rise up and make it clear that we will sing Christmas songs at the appropriate season, will also have Christmas holidays, not Winter Breaks, and will get out of school for Easter break, not for Spring Holiday. We will also advertise in local papers if a store refuses to allow bell ringers at Christmas or if they will not allow Christmas and Hannakah decorations, nativity and Menorah scenes, Carolers, and religious artifiacts and icons in Malls and on town streets and squares. We have been slapped in the face far too often, and our forefathers are literally spinning in their graves. We bring dishonor to those noble men and women if we continue to tolerate this nonsense in the guise of protecting someone's feelings, someone who, no doubt, enjoys forcing religious believers to bend to his/her obscene will. This has become Madalyn Murray O"Hair run madly amuck. When we pray, other than having to stand there quietly for a few moments of silence, exactly what are these people forced to give up? Nothing that is meaningful to them. Yet, we are being forced to shove our faith into the background and to endure our most sacred moments without God's blessing. There's no comparison between the two. None at all.

I also think we should teach children to stand with their hands over t their hearts when they hear the National Anthem being played or sang, and in our Pledge of Allegiance, we should always include "one nation under God."

Those of us of faith have been attacked on all fronts, and the attackers won't stop as long as we give in to them. In our nation founded on Judeo-Christian principles, people of fatth are told that they must go underground with their faith. Why? Who is doing this? What is the reason behind these ignoble demands. If we don't stop it, taken to it's logical conclusion, where is this leading us? It is obviously pointing toward eventually having to be highly secret about our belief in God for fear of reprisals. The time has come for us to stand up for what is right and stop this nonsense.

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California & New York does one need any other evidence as to why our country is slippin through the cracks

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Sorry. Was on my soapbox.

End of sermon.

Fran

wink.gifThat'll preach sista, that'll preach!wink.gif

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I am not the most prayerful person, though I pray for specifics, very greedy of me. I am not a regular churchgoer though I used to be but sort of "grew" out of it when the church became more intreference and earthbound than spiritual. I do not espouse, or eschew any religion or religious leaning.

In the case discussed here, I believe that "faith" has a great part to play and should. If the Christian population is upset enough, they should organize a great choir if nothing else and sing their hymns if they cannot preach any other way. At the same time, the Muslim community should be represented by those who believe in peace, do not believe the "infidel" should be slain, had no part in or agreement of the acts of 9/11 (believe me that is the major part of the Muslim community especially in North America). Then the Jewish community should be there too, prayer shawls and yalmakas, adding their prayers for the people lost, the families destroyed and a better understanding between people in the future.

That is what we are wanting, ... isn't it? Better understandaing? And that is one way to achieve it right? Getting together, accepting the differences in each of our faith-based communities?

It is for me.

:)

smee2

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Boycott the cities ceremonies and have one for the peoples. Another attempt at chipping away our constitutional right to assemble in God. Bilderburg, I mean Bloomberg, stay your happy self home. Oh yeah, don't you go to the mosque that is being built and pray to satin. Luciferan. Geez, who got me started.

I am not the most prayerful person, though I pray for specifics, very greedy of me. I am not a regular churchgoer though I used to be but sort of "grew" out of it when the church became more intreference and earthbound than spiritual. I do not espouse, or eschew any religion or religious leaning.

In the case discussed here, I believe that "faith" has a great part to play and should. If the Christian population is upset enough, they should organize a great choir if nothing else and sing their hymns if they cannot preach any other way. At the same time, the Muslim community should be represented by those who believe in peace, do not believe the "infidel" should be slain, had no part in or agreement of the acts of 9/11 (believe me that is the major part of the Muslim community especially in North America). Then the Jewish community should be there too, prayer shawls and yalmakas, adding their prayers for the people lost, the families destroyed and a better understanding between people in the future.

That is what we are wanting, ... isn't it? Better understandaing? And that is one way to achieve it right? Getting together, accepting the differences in each of our faith-based communities?

It is for me.

:)

smee2

Since you don't know much about the muslim faith it would be wise to get the koran and read it. There may be peaceful mulims but they do not know their own faith. Seriously, I did. Sharia law is the religion also. Jews and Christians are not their friends. They are not to befriend them. Oh, there is one good thing I can say, Thank GOD they all don't read and understand it. Listen to a guy who grew up there and how badly they try to discredit him because he did the unthinkable. Punishable by death. Converted. You tube. Walid Shoebat. He also interprets the bible a lot better than Christians because he natural language is Arabic.

Edited by uncirculd

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New York mayor bans prayer, clergy at 9/11 memorial service

Contact Mayor Bloomberg’s office today!

August 30, 2011

Dear Patrick,

The tenth anniversary of the Islamic jihadist attacks on New York on 9/11 will soon be upon us. Faith in God sustained millions of Americans on that day and the days that followed. Americans looked to God and to their spiritual leaders for comfort and guidance.

But New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has banned all clergy and all prayer from the upcoming 9/11 memorial service planned to commemorate the tragic events of that day.

In times of crisis, America’s political leaders have always turned to prayer. This includes FDR, who himself prayed on national radio on June 6, 1944, as our troops launched the invasion of Normandy.

It’s time that Mayor Bloomberg hears from all of us that this deliberate insult to the faith of Americans, and indeed to God himself, is inexcusable. As Rudy Washington, deputy mayor under former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, said, “This is America, and to have a memorial service where there’s no prayer, this appears to be insanity to me. I feel like America has lost its way.”

There is no direct email contact for Mayor Bloomberg but you are urged to contact him directly through the web form on his website to urge him to rescind his ban on clergy and prayer in this year’s 9/11 ceremony.

Suggested E-mail to Mayor Bloomberg

Dear Mayor Bloomberg:

It is inexcusable that clergy and prayer have been banned from the 9/11 memorial ceremony. Faith in God has sustained America in times of testing since our founding, and it is unconscionable that public expressions of trust in His wisdom and power have been banned in connection with the anniversary of the deadliest attack on Americans in our history. I urge you to reconsider and include clergy and prayer in this year’s ceremony.

Personal note: What the heck is this country coming to? dry.gif

Bet that doesn't sit to well with his Rabbi

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I am not the most prayerful person, though I pray for specifics, very greedy of me. I am not a regular churchgoer though I used to be but sort of "grew" out of it when the church became more intreference and earthbound than spiritual. I do not espouse, or eschew any religion or religious leaning.

In the case discussed here, I believe that "faith" has a great part to play and should. If the Christian population is upset enough, they should organize a great choir if nothing else and sing their hymns if they cannot preach any other way. At the same time, the Muslim community should be represented by those who believe in peace, do not believe the "infidel" should be slain, had no part in or agreement of the acts of 9/11 (believe me that is the major part of the Muslim community especially in North America). Then the Jewish community should be there too, prayer shawls and yalmakas, adding their prayers for the people lost, the families destroyed and a better understanding between people in the future.

That is what we are wanting, ... isn't it? Better understandaing? And that is one way to achieve it right? Getting together, accepting the differences in each of our faith-based communities?

It is for me.

smee2

I dunno'. Don't feel like extending much understanding to those who come to my country and then rise up and try to tell me what I can and can't do in a public forum. Of course, those on the left politically, with all their "feel-good" touchy-feely leanings toward illegal immigrants, including muslim radicals, have jumped into the fray as well. They seem to think people who are telling us we can't practice our faith in public have tender feelings that can be hurt if they see us doing what Americans have always done in the public forum. This is nonsense. They can't be hurt, They are the "hurters," not the "hurtees." What has happened to people of faith is unconscionable. I think we just couldn't believe what was happening at first, and then we were intimidated by the attacks on our faith, and as we kept silent, their rudeness toward us just kept intensifying, so that eventually, we felt our right to practice our faith as our ancestors and forefathers had done was denied to us. We behaved like sheep, doing what was demanded of us, and eventually our rights were taken away from us. Well, they aren't entirely gone yet, but we have to step up quickly, or they will be.

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