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8th ID

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About 8th ID

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  1. Sounds like the same thing that happened to me at BofA. Thats why I left them years ago. No customer service.
  2. Hiccup! I swwear ocifer, it was a big white wabbit that kicked my @ss!
  3. What does he want to know? I wish I was there to tell him it's very easy to understand. We have placed sanctions on a terrorist nation and you are not to do business with them. Plain and simple as that. Besides, they are really not your friend. They say they are, but they are not. Change the value of your currency and they will definitely become a moot point.
  4. Yep, I agree..They will see who is carrying a big stick and ain't afraid to use it.
  5. First off, it's not a government agency, it's an illegal foreign bank run by globalists that do not like the US and should be done away with. This says it all. This needs to be done away with. Seize the money and build the wall with it! OOOPSSS..Forgot to add.....Thanks again Yota for the hard work you put in. It is GREATLY appreciated!
  6. Thanks Yota! obummer and the demonrats got what they deserved. How many remember this: https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/jul/12/obama-admin-sent-taxpayer-money-oust-Netanyahu The US administration, under the direction of obama, meddled in Israel’s elections. obama was totally anti Israel. President Trump is totally for Israel. Look at what he has done for Israel. When we stand with and for Israel, this nation will prosper. I choose to stand with President Trump!
  7. It is strange. Look at what we put up with for 8 years under that Constitution hating muslim that was trying to destroy our country. Your still drinking the kool-aid from him and hillarious . It didn’t bring nothing to light except that the demonrats are still liars, crooks and cheats. Gen Flynn didn’t do anything wrong except get started on the office he was chosen for. He was told to confess or they would go after his son for something. He did what I would have probably done for my son, and that was take care of him. This whole investigation has been a sham based on fake documents and lying to federal judges so warrants could be obtained to try and gather some bs material so a soft coup could be done. I am pissed right now at the whole thing. They won’t stop and give the man his chance. I gave the last one his chance and it almost destroyed our nation. He is trying to right the ship. I can promise I won’t stand by again and let these communist/socialist pukes try to destroy this nation again!
  8. I can agree with ya on that ! However, this concept has been tried for years and has never been successful. What is the definition of insanity?
  9. Well I am not paying a dime for something that ended 154 years ago. This is absurd. Make the working people pay this and we will have another civil war on our hands and I can promise you I will lead the fight. I am fed up with this BS! What makes this so bad is the fraud and corruption that will come from this, which is nothing new from the demonrat socialist we have today.
  10. Rest in Peace Sir. I had the honor to meet and speak with him on several occasions. He was a true hero and always available to talk to. https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/04/09/last-doolittle-raiders-****-cole-dies-103.html Last of the Doolittle Raiders, Richard Cole, Dies at 103 9 Apr 2019 Military.com | By Oriana Pawlyk Retired Lt. Col. Richard "****" Cole, the last veteran of the famous "Doolittle Raid" on Tokyo during World War II, died Tuesday. He was 103. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein announced Tuesday during the Space Symposium in Colorado that Cole had died at Texas' San Antonio Medical Center. Goldfein had visited Cole at the hospital earlier this week, he said. "There's another hole in our formation," he told the audience Tuesday. "Our last remaining Doolittle Raider has slipped the surly bonds of Earth. He is now reunited with his fellow Raiders. And what a reunion they must be having." The famed raid was named for then-Lt. Col. James "Jimmy" Doolittle, who led 16 B-25 bombers and 80 crew members from the aircraft carrier Hornet in the western Pacific on a strike targeting factories and military installations in and around Tokyo on April 18, 1942. The mission helped boost morale after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Related content: Newly Colorized Photos Mark 75th Anniversary of Doolittle Raid Air Force Reveals First Operational Base for Futuristic B-21 Bomber Honor Flights Is in a Race Against Time to Bring World War II Vets to DC Cole, Doolittle's co-pilot on the mission, received the Distinguished Flying Cross for his role in the bombing. "Those 80 intrepid airmen changed the course of history," Goldfein said. "They executed a one-way mission without hesitation against enormous odds." Cole spoke to Military.com about the raid in 2016. "The flight was designed to do two things: One, to let the Japanese people know that they could be struck by air; and the other thing was the morale, and we did that, so we were very proud of that," he told Military.com. In 2014, then-President Barack Obama signed legislation awarding the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation's highest honor for distinguished achievements, to the Doolittle Raiders. Cole, who stood beside Obama during the signing, said he wished his fellow pilots could have been there to see the historic day. "I wish all of the Raiders were here to take part in the bill passing," he said in an interview with Air Force Times at the time. "I couldn't be happier." A year later, the medal was presented at the U.S. Capitol; it is now at the National Museum of the Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. On the 75th anniversary of the raid in 2017, veterans and leaders from across the U.S. honored the Raiders with a ceremony and a B-25 and B-1B Lancer flyover followed by a toast at the museum. On Tuesday, Goldfein recalled that ceremony. He said he asked Cole what it felt like to be "'flying blind for so many hours, low on gas, after they hit their targets, trying to make it to the Chinese coastline without a beacon to guide them." Cole, he said, joked it would have been nice to have had GPS back then. "We're going to miss Col. Cole, and we offer our eternal thanks and our condolences to his family," Goldfein said. "The legacy of the Doolittle Raiders will forever live in the hearts and minds of airmen long after we've all departed." The Raiders' achievements have been celebrated many times over the years. In 2017, President Donald Trump spoke with Cole during a phone call in advance of his 102nd birthday. The Air Force in 2016 named its next-generation B-21 Long Range Strike Bomber the Raider after the Doolittle Raiders, which Cole announced for the service.
  11. I saw this yesterday and and have not seen a post of it here yet. If it has been posted, I'm sorry and mods can fix it. However, this got me to thinking about what Yota just posted a short time ago with the parliament meeting and talking about foreign troops in Iraq again. I know some want us out and there are a number of iranian units and influence still there after ISIS's defeat. I am sure some of this was discussed with the speaker when he was here in the US last week. This could have possibly been a good move. Iraq now has a decision to make, get rid of the iranian influence and be our friend, or we will take care of them for dealing with terrorists. I would be curious to hear some other thoughts and comments about this. http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/us-declares-irans-guard-force-a-terrorist-organization/ar-BBVIhXy?ocid=ientp US labels elite Iran force a foreign terrorist organization WASHINGTON — The United States on Monday designated Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps a foreign terrorist organization, an unprecedented declaration against a foreign government that may prompt retaliation and make it harder for American diplomats and military officers to work with allies in the region. It is the first time that the U.S. has designated an entity of another government as a terrorist organization, placing a group with vast economic resources that answers only to Iran's supreme leader in the same category as al-Qaida and the Islamic State. "This unprecedented step, led by the Department of State, recognizes the reality that Iran is not only a state sponsor of terrorism, but that the IRGC actively participates in, finances and promotes terrorism as a tool of statecraft," President Donald Trump said in announcing the measure. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the designation is intended to increase pressure on Iran, isolating it further and diverting some of the financial resources it uses to fund terrorism and militant activity in the Middle East and beyond. But, in addition to the potential for Iranian retaliation, it complicates a delicate balance for U.S. personnel in at least two key countries. The administration went ahead with the designation despite expressions of "serious" concern by senior defense and intelligence officials about the possibility of retaliation, as well as the effectiveness against an organization already subject to sanctions, according to two U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the decision. Photo gallery by Reuters Pompeo said the move is part of an effort to put "maximum pressure" on Iran to end its support for terrorist plots and militant activity that destabilizes the Middle East. Speaking to reporters, he rattled off a list of attacks dating to the 1980s for which the U.S. holds Iran and the IRGC responsible, beginning with the attacks on the Marine Corps barracks in Beirut, Lebanon in 1983. No waivers or exceptions to the sanctions were announced, meaning U.S. troops and diplomats could be barred from speaking with Iraqi or Lebanese authorities who have dealings with Guard officials or surrogates. Such contact occurs now between U.S. officials in Iraq who deal with Iranian-affiliated Shiite militias and in Lebanon, where the Iran-backed Hezbollah movement is in parliament and the government. The Pentagon and U.S. intelligence agencies had raised concerns about the impact of the designation if the move did not allow contact with other foreign officials who may have met with or communicated with Guard personnel. Those concerns have in part dissuaded previous administrations from taking the step, which has been considered for more than a decade. FILE - In this Feb, 11, 2019 file photo, Iranian Revolutionary Guard members arrive for a ceremony celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, at the Azadi, or Freedom, Square, in Tehran, Iran. President Donald Trump's administration is preparing to designate Iran's Revolutionary Guard as a "foreign terrorist organization." It's an unprecedented move that could have widespread implications for U.S. personnel and policy in the Mideast and elsewhere. U.S. officials say an announcement is expected Monday. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi) Previous SlideNext Slide Full screen 1/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb, 11, 2019 file photo, Iranian Revolutionary Guard members arrive for a ceremony celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, at the Azadi, or Freedom, Square, in Tehran, Iran. President Donald Trump's administration is preparing to designate Iran's Revolutionary Guard as a "foreign terrorist organization." It's an unprecedented move that could have widespread implications for U.S. personnel and policy in the Mideast and elsewhere. U.S. officials say an announcement is expected Monday. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi) 2/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at a news conference to announce the Trump administration's plan to designate Iran's Revolutionary Guard a "foreign terrorist organization," Monday, April 8, 2019, at the U.S. State Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) 3/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2016 file photo, Iran's Revolutionary Guard troops march in a military parade marking the 36th anniversary of Iraq's 1980 invasion of Iran, in front of the shrine of late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, just outside Tehran, Iran. The Trump administration is preparing to designate Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corps a “foreign terrorist organization” in an unprecedented move that could have widespread implications for U.S. personnel and policy. U.S. Officials say an announcement could come as early as Monday, April 8, 2019, following a months-long escalation in the administration’s rhetoric against Iran. The move would be the first such designation by any U.S. administration of an entire foreign government entity. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File) 4/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at a news conference to announce the Trump administration's plan to designate Iran's Revolutionary Guard a "foreign terrorist organization," Monday, April 8, 2019, at the U.S. State Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) 5/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2017, file photo, the head of Iran's Revolutionary Guard Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari speaks to journalists after his speech at a conference called "A World Without Terror," in Tehran, Iran. On Monday, April 8, 2019, the Trump administration designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a “foreign terrorist organization” in an unprecedented move against a national armed force. Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps went from being a domestic security force with origins in the 1979 Islamic Revolution to a transnational fighting force. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File) 6/6 SLIDES © The Associated Press FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2011 file photo, female members of the Iranian paramilitary Basij force, affiliated with the Revolutionary Guard stand in formation as a woman photographs them in a rally in front of the former US Embassy in Tehran, Iran. On Monday, April 8, 2019, the Trump administration designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a “foreign terrorist organization” in an unprecedented move against a national armed force. Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps went from being a domestic security force with origins in the 1979 Islamic Revolution to a transnational fighting force.(AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File) 6/6 SLIDES The Justice Department said Monday it would prosecute violations but officials declined to say how broadly they would interpret the provision barring "material support" to the IRGC. A strict interpretation would leave hundreds of European companies and executives at risk for U.S. travel bans or criminal penalties in addition to limiting American officials' ability to deal with foreign counterparts who have links to the guard. The designation "raises the question of whether a non-U.S. company or individual could be prosecuted for engaging in commercial transactions with an Iranian company controlled by the IRGC," said Anthony Rapa, an international trade and national security attorney with Kirkland and Ellis. Critics of the hardline policy also see it as a prelude to conflict. "This move closes yet another potential door for peacefully resolving tensions with Iran," said Trita Parsi, the founder of the National Iranian American Council. "Once all doors are closed, and diplomacy is rendered impossible, war will essentially become inevitable." National Security Action, a group made up of mainly former Obama administration officials, said it would put U.S. troops at risk while jeopardizing the 2015 nuclear accord with which Iran is still complying. "We need to call out today's move for what it is: another dangerous and self-defeating tactic that endangers our troops and serves nothing but the Trump administration's goal of destroying the Iran deal," it said. The designation could also open hundreds of foreign companies and business executives to U.S. travel bans and possible prosecution for sanctions violations. The IRGC is a paramilitary organization formed in the wake of Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution to defend the government. The force answers only to Iran's supreme leader, operates independently of the regular military and has vast economic interests across the country. The U.S. estimates it may control or have a significant influence over up to 50% of the Iranian economy, including non-military sectors like banking and shipping. Iran has long been designated a "state sponsor of terrorism" by the U.S. and the State Department currently designates more than 60 organizations as "foreign terrorist organizations." But none of them is a state-run military. Iran immediately responded to the designation with its Supreme National Security Council designating the U.S. Central Command, also known as CENTCOM, and all its forces as terrorist, and labeling the U.S. a "supporter of terrorism." The Council denounced the U.S. decision as "illegal and dangerous" and said the U.S. government would be responsible for all "dangerous repercussions" of its decision. It defended the IRGC, which has fought Islamic State fighters, as being a force against terrorism. American military commanders were planning to warn U.S. troops remaining in Iraq, Syria and elsewhere in the region of the possibility of retaliation. Aside from Iraq, where some 5,200 American troops are stationed, and Syria, where some U.S. 2,000 troops remain, the U.S. 5th Fleet, which operates in the Persian Gulf from its base in Bahrain, and the Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar, are potentially at risk. The U.S. special envoy for Iran, Brian Hook, and the State Department's counterterrorism coordinator, Nathan Sales, said the decision was reached after consultation with agencies throughout the government but would not say in a news conference if the military or intelligence concerns had been addressed. "Doing this will not impede our diplomacy," Hook said, without elaborating. He noted that the U.S. has at various times had contact or even formal negotiations with members of groups that are subject to sanctions. Reaction from those who favor tougher engagement with Iran was quick and welcoming. "Thank you, my dear friend, US President Donald Trump," Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a tweet, a day before what could be a close election. "Thank you for answering another of my important requests that serves the interests of our countries and of countries in the region." Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, called the action an "overdue" but essential step that should be followed by additional sanctions. Rep. Michael McCaul of Texas, top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said the designation "ends the facade that the IRGC is part of a normal military." And, the Iranian opposition group, the National Council of Resistance of Iran, called it "an imperative for Middle East security, peace, and stability, and an urgent and necessary step to end war and terrorism throughout the region and the world."
  12. I'm getting a stormtrooper suit !
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