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Baghdad, September 8 / September (Rn) – The Commission on oil and energy in the

Iraqi Council of Representatives on Thursday, the Council decided to re-oil and

gas law to the cabinet because the government passed without due process of law.

The move comes three days after the rejection of the Kurdistan region of

Iraq to the draft law ratified by the government and sent to the House of

Representatives for approval.

He attributed a statement to the

presidency of the region of rejection to the draft that was different from the

prior agreement between the political blocs and passed the government without

due legal, as well as it gives wide powers to the federal government at the

expense of the region and the provinces.

A member of the Committee, Uday

Awad told the Kurdish news agency (Rn), “The House of Representatives decided to

re-draft law of oil and gas to the Cabinet because of the included minutes of

the meeting of the Council and the signatures of some ministers.”

The

Kurdistan Alliance bloc, said yesterday that two of the Kurds attended the

meeting of Ministers Council of Ministers approved the draft oil law did not

sign the draft because of objections it.

Awad said that “the House of

Representatives called on the Government to include a draft law of oil and gas

and signatures of the minutes of the meeting of Ministers”, pointing out that

“the Commission will proceed to discuss the draft law of oil and gas made by the

previous government in 2007 after a meeting for him.”

He continued by

saying that “the Committee stressed the need to get a bill to combine the past

and the government bill.”

The oil imports about 95% of Iraq’s budget,

but so far nothing in the law regulating the affairs of the country after the

failure of the House of Representatives to pass Bdorth previous oil and gas law,

which was expected to rise oil situation if approved.

The absence of law

and the cause of a number of problems in this sector, particularly oil contracts

signed by the Kurdistan Regional Government with international companies to

develop fields, and Baghdad says it is “illegal”, while confirming the region

“compatibility with the Iraqi law.”

The reason for the difference mainly

to the powers in the management of oil wealth and Baghdad, which insists that it

must be one of the functions of the federal government.

The leader of

the Iraqi List, Iyad Allawi, said in a statement issued by his office yesterday

to submit all agreements and contracts with international companies, which will

be obtained under the authority of the House of Representatives for review.

He stressed the review of the draft law of oil and gas issued by the

Cabinet a thorough review with all parties in the cabinet.

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Thanks for the post but I have one question. Where is the link? :unsure:

...maybe it was lost... "in translation"! rolleyes.gifwink.gif

Come on boyz... gitter dun!!!

GO RV Already Baby!!!cool.gif

Edited by RodandStaff
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ALLAWI is going to try and stop everything MALIKI does until he completes the arbil agreement.The RV will not happen until one of these guys give in or done away with.Maliki doesn't want the people to prosper due to poor people being easier to control.

didnt they vote on something that limits the term of the PM?

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Why would two Kurds approve it, yet have objections to it? :blink:

I'm off on a tangent of my own here, but I suspect it's because, in a negotiated situation, you get some of what you want, but probably not all of it. They are probably objecting to the parts they negotiated away. However, what I'm saying is a reasonable conclusion of a person who grew up in a free culture, and we all know that Iraqis are part of another culture, an ancient one in which the right to negotiate, let alone the adaptabality to it, have not been held as high values. Even from the safety of middle- America, I can see so many of them attempting to rise to this new challenge and trying courageously to make this huge shift in their country, and even more, in their individual worldviews. Doing this is surely an enormous leap across centuries for many of them, while we have had the advantage growing with the development of our own culture. Not only are they attempting a valient leap across the 30 years of Saddam's cruelty and control, but also across many centuries of tribalism, so I would think that, when many Iraqis do make this leap, the new freedoms in which they find themselves, although desperately wanted, could feel a little intimidating, possibly somewhat uncomfortable, and perhaps not quite natural to them. I could be wrong, of course, but I suspect it will take a couple generations or more for many, if not most, Iraqi citizens to feel completely comfortable in their own skins in this huge paradigm shift in their country, and therefore, in their lives. So what they are attempting to do to change their country, both their successes and failures, earns and deserves our highest respect.

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I'm off on a tangent of my own here, but I suspect it's because, in a negotiated situation, you get some of what you want, but probably not all of it. They are probably objecting to the parts they negotiated away. However, what I'm saying is a reasonable conclusion of a person who grew up in a free culture, and we all know that Iraqis are part of another culture, an ancient one in which the right to negotiate, let alone the adaptabality to it, have not been held as high values. Even from the safety of middle- America, I can see so many of them attempting to rise to this new challenge and trying courageously to make this huge shift in their country, and even more, in their individual worldviews. Doing this is surely an enormous leap across centuries for many of them, while we have had the advantage growing with the development of our own culture. Not only are they attempting a valient leap across the 30 years of Saddam's cruelty and control, but also across many centuries of tribalism, so I would think that, when many Iraqis do make this leap, the new freedoms in which they find themselves, although desperately wanted, could feel a little intimidating, possibly somewhat uncomfortable, and perhaps not quite natural to them. I could be wrong, of course, but I suspect it will take a couple generations or more for many, if not most, Iraqi citizens to feel completely comfortable in their own skins in this huge paradigm shift in their country, and therefore, in their lives.

Good post Francie.

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I'm off on a tangent of my own here, but I suspect it's because, in a negotiated situation, you get some of what you want, but probably not all of it. They are probably objecting to the parts they negotiated away. However, what I'm saying is a reasonable conclusion of a person who grew up in a free culture, and we all know that Iraqis are part of another culture, an ancient one in which the right to negotiate, let alone the adaptabality to it, have not been held as high values. Even from the safety of middle- America, I can see so many of them attempting to rise to this new challenge and trying courageously to make this huge shift in their country, and even more, in their individual worldviews. Doing this is surely an enormous leap across centuries for many of them, while we have had the advantage growing with the development of our own culture. Not only are they attempting a valient leap across the 30 years of Saddam's cruelty and control, but also across many centuries of tribalism, so I would think that, when many Iraqis do make this leap, the new freedoms in which they find themselves, although desperately wanted, could feel a little intimidating, possibly somewhat uncomfortable, and perhaps not quite natural to them. I could be wrong, of course, but I suspect it will take a couple generations or more for many, if not most, Iraqi citizens to feel completely comfortable in their own skins in this huge paradigm shift in their country, and therefore, in their lives. So what they are attempting to do to change their country, both their successes and failures, earns and deserves our highest respect.

Don't know about this F. Unlike city folk, tribal people are generally proud, fierce and uncompromising in their standards, their word is their bond and they pay for slip-ups with blood. In all probability they are being given a less than optional deal and they are divided between a quick profit and a just caution for the wealth of their children that is being bartered away so easily.

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...maybe it was lost... "in translation"! rolleyes.gifwink.gif

Come on boyz... gitter dun!!!

GO RV Already Baby!!!cool.gif

I love your new "urge" to Iraq to get this done!! :lol::D:D:P

ALLAWI is going to try and stop everything MALIKI does until he completes the arbil agreement.The RV will not happen until one of these guys give in or done away with.Maliki doesn't want the people to prosper due to poor people being easier to control.

Although I have to admire Allawi for attempting this, I doubt that what he is doing will stop Maliki. But something should. Iraqi citizens will not be able to get jobs and live their lives in any comfort until Maliki is out of power.

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