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Anti US Al Sadr Wins Iraq Election.


Luigi1
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Luigi found this article of Dinarian interests...

Early voting results has Sadr in the lead.

Sadr is a anti American nationalist that wants all US troops removed from Iraq.

Treat as a rumor.  Not verified.  Your opine.

 

 

 

 

TNT:

Tishwash: I still don't think this is officially official though hahaha...

Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr

Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's party swept an Iraqi election on Monday, coming first and increasing the number of seats he holds in parliament, according to initial results, officials and a spokesperson for the Sadrist Movement.

A count based on initial results from several Iraqi provinces plus the capital Baghdad, verified by local government officials, suggested Sadr had won more than 70 of the 329 seats in parliament.

A spokesperson for Sadr's office said the number was 73 seats. Local news outlets published the same figure.

An official at Iraq's electoral commission said Sadr had come first but could not immediately confirm how many seats his party had won. link

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BAGHDAD, Oct 11 (Reuters) - Shi'ite Muslim cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's party was the biggest winner in an Iraqi election on Monday, increasing the number of seats he holds in parliament, according to initial results, officials and a spokesperson for the Sadrist Movement.

Former prime minister Nouri al-Maliki looked set to have the next largest win among Shi'ite parties, initial results showed.

Iraq's Shi'ite groups have dominated governments and government formation since the U.S.-led invasion of 2003 that toppled Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein and catapulted the Shi'ite majority and the Kurds to power.

Sunday's election was held several months early, in response to mass protests in 2019 that toppled a government and showed widespread anger against political leaders whom many Iraqis say have enriched themselves at the expense of the country.

But a record low turnout suggested that a vote billed as an chance to wrest control from the ruling elite would do little to dislodge sectarian religious parties in power since 2003.

A count based on initial results from several provinces plus the capital Baghdad, verified by local government officials, suggested Sadr had won more than 70 seats, which if confirmed could give him considerable influence in forming a government.

However, Sadr's group is just one of several that will have to enter negotiations to form a coalition capable of dominating parliament and forming an administration, a period of jockeying for position that may take weeks or longer.

Sadr broadcast a live speech on state TV claiming victory and promising a nationalist government free of foreign interference.

 

https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/iraq-counts-votes-after-lowest-ever-election-turnout-2021-10-11/

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Laid Back said:

BAGHDAD, Oct 11 (Reuters) - Shi'ite Muslim cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's party was the biggest winner in an Iraqi election on Monday, increasing the number of seats he holds in parliament, according to initial results, officials and a spokesperson for the Sadrist Movement.

Former prime minister Nouri al-Maliki looked set to have the next largest win among Shi'ite parties, initial results showed.

Iraq's Shi'ite groups have dominated governments and government formation since the U.S.-led invasion of 2003 that toppled Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein and catapulted the Shi'ite majority and the Kurds to power.

Sunday's election was held several months early, in response to mass protests in 2019 that toppled a government and showed widespread anger against political leaders whom many Iraqis say have enriched themselves at the expense of the country.

But a record low turnout suggested that a vote billed as an chance to wrest control from the ruling elite would do little to dislodge sectarian religious parties in power since 2003.

A count based on initial results from several provinces plus the capital Baghdad, verified by local government officials, suggested Sadr had won more than 70 seats, which if confirmed could give him considerable influence in forming a government.

However, Sadr's group is just one of several that will have to enter negotiations to form a coalition capable of dominating parliament and forming an administration, a period of jockeying for position that may take weeks or longer.

Sadr broadcast a live speech on state TV claiming victory and promising a nationalist government free of foreign interference.

 

https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/iraq-counts-votes-after-lowest-ever-election-turnout-2021-10-11/

 

 

 

 

Thanks.  Lest we forget...Al Sadr is a hardliner, a pro Islamic State advocate.

If there is a RV/RI, cash out immediately.  Don't hang around waiting for a better rate.

Take the money & run just in case Iraq goes to pot & while the getting is good.

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BAGHDAD (AP) — An alliance of Iraqi candidates representing Shiite militias supported by neighboring Iran has emerged as the biggest loser in the country’s national elections, according to partial results released Monday. 

The results, posted online successively, also showed the bloc of Iraq’s populist Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr maintaining the most seats in parliament, leading in several of Iraq’s 18 provinces, including the capital Baghdad. Al-Sadr, a maverick leader remembered for leading an insurgency against U.S. forces after the 2003 invasion, appeared to have increased his movement’s seats in the 329-member parliament from 54 in 2018 to more than 70. 

With 94% of the ballot boxes counted, none of the competing political blocs appeared on track to win a majority in parliament and consequently name a prime minister. But as the results stand, al-Sadr’s bloc will be able to take a leading role in the political horse-trading to find a compromise candidate and set the political agenda for the next four years. 

Al-Sadr’s candidates beat out Iran’s favored candidates from the Fatah Alliance to come out first, according to preliminary results. The Fatah Alliance, led by paramilitary leader Hadi al-Ameri, is comprised of parties and affiliated with the Popular Mobilization Forces, an umbrella group of mostly pro-Iran Shiite militias. The alliance rose to prominence during the war against the Sunni extremist Islamic State group. It includes some of the most hard-line Iran-backed factions, such as the Asaib Ahl al-Haq militia.

It was not immediately clear Monday how many seats the Fatah Alliance lost, from the 48 they got in 2018.

Voter turnout was 41%, a record low in the post-Saddam Hussein era signaling widespread distrust of the country’s leaders and the vote for a new parliament. That’s down from 44% in the 2018 elections, which was an all-time low.

Still, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres congratulated the Iraqi people “for the way the elections took place.” He appealed for calm as the results are announced and for political discussions on the formation of a new government to be carried out in “an environment of peace, of security and of tranquility.”

The weekend’s election was held months ahead of schedule as a concession to a youth-led popular uprising against corruption and mismanagement. But the vote was marred by widespread apathy and a boycott by many of the same young activists who thronged the streets of Baghdad and Iraq’s southern provinces in late 2019, calling for sweeping reforms and new elections.

Tens of thousands of people protested in late 2019 and early 2020, and were met by security forces firing live ammunition and tear gas. More than 600 people were killed and thousands injured within just a few months. 

Although authorities gave in and called the early elections, the death toll and the heavy-handed crackdown — as well as a string of targeted assassinations and attempted killings — prompted many protesters to later call for a boycott of the vote. 

Many of the young activists who took part in the 2019 protests also raged against Iran’s heavy-handed influence in Iraqi politics, including armed militias who rival the state’s authority. Many blamed the militias for taking part with security forces in brutally suppressing the protests, possibly playing a role in Fatah’s poor showing.

Al-Sadr, a black-turbaned nationalist leader, is also close to Iran, but publicly rejects its political influence. 

The election was the sixth held since the fall of Saddam Hussein after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Many were skeptical that independent candidates from the protest movement stood a chance against well-entrenched parties and politicians, many of them backed by powerful armed militias.

Preliminary results showed several independent candidates getting into parliament, although the number of seats was not immediately known. 

There was a marked reluctance among young Iraqis — the country’s largest demographic — to get out and vote. Many expressed views that the system is immune to reform and that the election would only bring back the same faces and parties responsible for the corruption and mismanagement that has plagued Iraq for decades. The problems have left the country with crumbling infrastructure, growing poverty and rising unemployment rates. 

Under Iraq’s laws, the party that wins the most seats gets to choose the country’s next prime minister, but it’s unlikely any of the competing coalitions can secure a clear majority. That will require a lengthy process involving backroom negotiations to select a consensus prime minister and agree on a new coalition government.

Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi has played a key role as a mediator in the region’s crises, particularly between regional rivals Iran and Saudi Arabia. Many in the region and beyond will be watching to see if he will secure a second term.

The new parliament will also elect Iraq’s next president.

 

https://apnews.com/article/baghdad-middle-east-iraq-boycotts-e51c2111acce2055b879f7a26430ba7b

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Laid Back said:

BAGHDAD (AP) — An alliance of Iraqi candidates representing Shiite militias supported by neighboring Iran has emerged as the biggest loser in the country’s national elections, according to partial results released Monday. 

The results, posted online successively, also showed the bloc of Iraq’s populist Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr maintaining the most seats in parliament, leading in several of Iraq’s 18 provinces, including the capital Baghdad. Al-Sadr, a maverick leader remembered for leading an insurgency against U.S. forces after the 2003 invasion, appeared to have increased his movement’s seats in the 329-member parliament from 54 in 2018 to more than 70. 

With 94% of the ballot boxes counted, none of the competing political blocs appeared on track to win a majority in parliament and consequently name a prime minister. But as the results stand, al-Sadr’s bloc will be able to take a leading role in the political horse-trading to find a compromise candidate and set the political agenda for the next four years. 

Al-Sadr’s candidates beat out Iran’s favored candidates from the Fatah Alliance to come out first, according to preliminary results. The Fatah Alliance, led by paramilitary leader Hadi al-Ameri, is comprised of parties and affiliated with the Popular Mobilization Forces, an umbrella group of mostly pro-Iran Shiite militias. The alliance rose to prominence during the war against the Sunni extremist Islamic State group. It includes some of the most hard-line Iran-backed factions, such as the Asaib Ahl al-Haq militia.

It was not immediately clear Monday how many seats the Fatah Alliance lost, from the 48 they got in 2018.

Voter turnout was 41%, a record low in the post-Saddam Hussein era signaling widespread distrust of the country’s leaders and the vote for a new parliament. That’s down from 44% in the 2018 elections, which was an all-time low.

Still, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres congratulated the Iraqi people “for the way the elections took place.” He appealed for calm as the results are announced and for political discussions on the formation of a new government to be carried out in “an environment of peace, of security and of tranquility.”

The weekend’s election was held months ahead of schedule as a concession to a youth-led popular uprising against corruption and mismanagement. But the vote was marred by widespread apathy and a boycott by many of the same young activists who thronged the streets of Baghdad and Iraq’s southern provinces in late 2019, calling for sweeping reforms and new elections.

Tens of thousands of people protested in late 2019 and early 2020, and were met by security forces firing live ammunition and tear gas. More than 600 people were killed and thousands injured within just a few months. 

Although authorities gave in and called the early elections, the death toll and the heavy-handed crackdown — as well as a string of targeted assassinations and attempted killings — prompted many protesters to later call for a boycott of the vote. 

Many of the young activists who took part in the 2019 protests also raged against Iran’s heavy-handed influence in Iraqi politics, including armed militias who rival the state’s authority. Many blamed the militias for taking part with security forces in brutally suppressing the protests, possibly playing a role in Fatah’s poor showing.

Al-Sadr, a black-turbaned nationalist leader, is also close to Iran, but publicly rejects its political influence. 

The election was the sixth held since the fall of Saddam Hussein after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Many were skeptical that independent candidates from the protest movement stood a chance against well-entrenched parties and politicians, many of them backed by powerful armed militias.

Preliminary results showed several independent candidates getting into parliament, although the number of seats was not immediately known. 

There was a marked reluctance among young Iraqis — the country’s largest demographic — to get out and vote. Many expressed views that the system is immune to reform and that the election would only bring back the same faces and parties responsible for the corruption and mismanagement that has plagued Iraq for decades. The problems have left the country with crumbling infrastructure, growing poverty and rising unemployment rates. 

Under Iraq’s laws, the party that wins the most seats gets to choose the country’s next prime minister, but it’s unlikely any of the competing coalitions can secure a clear majority. That will require a lengthy process involving backroom negotiations to select a consensus prime minister and agree on a new coalition government.

Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi has played a key role as a mediator in the region’s crises, particularly between regional rivals Iran and Saudi Arabia. Many in the region and beyond will be watching to see if he will secure a second term.

The new parliament will also elect Iraq’s next president.

 

https://apnews.com/article/baghdad-middle-east-iraq-boycotts-e51c2111acce2055b879f7a26430ba7b

 

 

 

Thanks for this update.

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Sorry. I was unable to copy the translation.

 

 

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Thanks @Carrello
 

Baghdad today – Baghdad
Today, Monday, the leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, affirmed work to improve and raise the level of the Iraqi dinar to be in the ranks of global currencies gradually.

Al-Sadr said in a speech after announcing the results of his bloc’s victory, which I followed (Baghdad Today): “This is your day, O people of Iraq, in which reform has won. It is the day of Iraq, determination and steadfastness.”

He added, “Praise be to the one who cherished reform with its largest Iraqi bloc, neither eastern nor western, and there is no place for corruption and corrupt people after today,” noting that “all embassies are welcome provided that they do not interfere in Iraqi affairs or form the government.”

Al-Sadr stressed that “the arms are confined to the hands of the state and prevented from using them outside this scope,” noting that “it is the Iraq of the reference and the wise, and we will be enlightened by their opinions.”

He stated that “it will not be for the government or the parties to control the money and wealth, but it is for the people,” threatening to “displace corruption and the corrupt.”

He continued by saying: ” The people’s oil is for the people, and we will improve the dinar to be in the ranks of international currencies gradually and activate the role of clans to support the stability of Iraq,” calling for “the confiscation of arms in the hands of the state, even if it claims to represent the resistance.”

Al-Sadr called for “celebrating the victory without harassing others or causing inconvenience to them.”

The Sadrist bloc won 73 parliamentary seats, according to the results announced by the Electoral Commission on Monday, to occupy the first place.

 10/11/2021 20:49

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7 minutes ago, Laid Back said:

Muqtada al-Sadr, affirmed work to improve and raise the level of the Iraqi dinar to be in the ranks of global currencies gradually.

I hope he can deliver on this promise.
 

It will take some time for the new government to form. Ultimately, the CBI pulls the lever, but a government and leaders who support a stronger currency would have influence. 

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12 minutes ago, Laid Back said:

Thanks @Carrello
 

Baghdad today – Baghdad
Today, Monday, the leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, affirmed work to improve and raise the level of the Iraqi dinar to be in the ranks of global currencies gradually.

Al-Sadr said in a speech after announcing the results of his bloc’s victory, which I followed (Baghdad Today): “This is your day, O people of Iraq, in which reform has won. It is the day of Iraq, determination and steadfastness.”

He added, “Praise be to the one who cherished reform with its largest Iraqi bloc, neither eastern nor western, and there is no place for corruption and corrupt people after today,” noting that “all embassies are welcome provided that they do not interfere in Iraqi affairs or form the government.”

Al-Sadr stressed that “the arms are confined to the hands of the state and prevented from using them outside this scope,” noting that “it is the Iraq of the reference and the wise, and we will be enlightened by their opinions.”

He stated that “it will not be for the government or the parties to control the money and wealth, but it is for the people,” threatening to “displace corruption and the corrupt.”

He continued by saying: ” The people’s oil is for the people, and we will improve the dinar to be in the ranks of international currencies gradually and activate the role of clans to support system" rel="">support the stability of Iraq,” calling for “the confiscation of arms in the hands of the state, even if it claims to represent the resistance.”

Al-Sadr called for “celebrating the victory without harassing others or causing inconvenience to them.”

The Sadrist bloc won 73 parliamentary seats, according to the results announced by the Electoral Commission on Monday, to occupy the first place.

 10/11/2021 20:49

So is Kazemi part of his bloc which I don’t think he is? If not then Kazemi will no longer be the PM, Sadr will put forth his PM correct?? Thanks

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8 hours ago, Fairways&Greens said:

I hope he can deliver on this promise.
 

It will take some time for the new government to form. Ultimately, the CBI pulls the lever, but a government and leaders who support system" rel="">support a stronger currency would have influence. 

suckers are all about the money

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2 hours ago, screwball said:

i suppose we wait for the announcement of PM now?


I can’t see them not nominated Sadr himself for the PM spot.   Not sure if Sadr is up To being the PM.  Unless they really trust Kazemi to follow through with what the Sadrist Party wants.  

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1 hour ago, Luigi1 said:

 

Al Sadr is a strong advocate & a voice of total independence from foreign powers.  He wants all US forces gone.

As always your flacky intellect is both astounding and revealing. 

 

 

11 minutes ago, DinarDavo said:

 

Weren't Sadr and Maliki bros during Potato Heads regime?

It greatly saddens me how many people forget about the hundreds of American Soldiers brutally murdered under the Satanic Sadrs own militias. 

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2 hours ago, DinarDavo said:

 

Weren't Sadr and Maliki bros during Potato Heads regime?

 

Mailiki & Sadr often bumped heads & disagreed on many issues especially Iran's influences over  CBI money auctions & all the proceeds going to Iran.

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5 minutes ago, Longtimelurker said:

Prime Minister, Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces @MAKadhimi He visits the Joint Operations Command and is briefed on the progress of procedures for protecting warehouses and ballot boxes

If the Iraqi election works out and is fair, maybe they could send some election workers to Pittsburgh in 2024. 😁:peace:

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