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British report: Iraq will not recover economically during 2022


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11 hours ago, Artitech said:

I don’t think Adam has bailed on this investment. There is really nothing else to hash out! I believe Iraq has completed everything that needs to be accomplished! I believe that they are Article 8 complaint and they can RV / RI at anytime the cbi wants to! Supposedly on the 17th of October the CBI is stopping the auctions, as we know them! If my memory serves me right, Adam has said that when this happens we should see the RV the same day or shortly after that! I could be wrong, but I think that is a trigger we have been looking for all these years! If I’m wrong in my assessment I’m sure someone will correct me! Adam has given everyone here on this site very solid information on the crypto currency’s mainly Bit coin! If everyone would have taken his advice about 4 and half years ago, we wouldn’t really give a rats rear end if the dinar RV ed or not! I realize not everyone was able to take advantage of the bit coin situation. I know I just missed the boat this second go round! Then it was to late for me, to get involved, if we do see an RV , I will get involved! I think they are supposed to have their elections this weekend! So we should start seeing some very positive things happening this week! JMHO 🤠!!

Good post. My own comment is just as optimistic as yours. My take is that we have entered the "low risk category" of investments. The news has been consistently good, for so long, I don't see any sign this is going anywhere except, a happy ending. 

 

Yeah, the risk is long washed out. The risk was extremely high at the beginning. Now I'd rate this investment "very low risk".

 

I know it doesn't seem that way because we have waited so long, but I think it's the truth. The "Promised Land" is in sight, folks. Moses Adam is just taking a break. Pray for him, he's been a very faithful positive leader. This time, Moses will enter the Promised Land! :bananacamel::cigar::bagofmoney:

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I just read the main article . I see hope there peeps. Yes the Middle East is a complicated and risky place to do business  in. It has always been that way , at least since WW II . Which is when Israel was re-established as a nation and petro currency became a thing . Still the countries of the region did business and made lotsa money.  The region will always have a element of investments being riskier there I think. 70% vaccination rate amongst its population, correct me if I am wrong, isn't that the same as in the USA ? They have the cash to buy more vaccines in Iraq, and many countries of the region . Those big pharma companies are to skinny and need more fattening up. Plus India and Iran are hubs in the region for the manufacturing of generic medications. Like it or not there are alternate treatments out there for covid 19 . Yes hydroxychloroquine, ivermectin,  high zinc, high vit C, steroids (prednislone), aspirin ( as a blood thinner). Yes , hcq and ivermectin are anti-parasitics that NOW have a documented off script effectiveness against C 19. With the NASDAQ computer system running Iraqi Stock Exchange . And a billion things more there is hope that Iraq can still be the economic power house it desires to be . The sucky part is that they are the country that stands between Saudi's Arabia and Iran . This weakness I think can be their strength .

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One of the Horsemen in our group suggested with the elections taking place, these boneheaded criminal fools could stretch out forming a government for 3 to 6 months ( or longer ) without anything getting done. . . To include delaying the RI/RV.

 

Others in our group have seconded that suggestion and the heated discussion has ensued within the Herd.

 

Anyone care to chime in here, Pro or Con feel free. ( 18 years and still waiting :facepalm: )

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The dead hand of America: Iraq vote won’t solve the failures of West’s nation-building 18 years after Saddam’s removal

9 Oct, 2021 12:04
 

The dead hand of America: Iraq vote won’t solve the failures of West’s nation-building 18 years after Saddam’s removal

SHARIYA, IRAQ, on October 8, 2021. © AFP / Ismael ADNAN

By James Fox, a British journalist and writer at RT. He has written a doctoral thesis on local content in resource economies and has contributed to academic work on global supply chains.

Iraqis take to the polls on Sunday for an early election, however it promises to bring nothing but disappointment for the thousands who demanded it, as America’s failed nation-building project continues to underdeliver.

Two years ago, thousands of Iraqis took to the streets to demand an end to corruption, misgovernance and a sectarian political system, imposed by the United States after the fall of Saddam Hussein, that allows for the systematic plundering of the state and its national resources. 

The system, known as ‘muhasasa,’ was developed by Saddam’s opposition in exile in anticipation of a post-Ba’athist Iraq and was adopted by the conquering US forces who believed balancing sectarian demands would allow for the creation of a stable political settlement. 

But while muhasasa was devised to divvy up political positions and power on the basis of sectarian or ethnic quotas, it has become a cypher for politically sanctioned corruption and the continued enrichment of elites and their followers. 

READ MORE

Shocking report exposes how US defense contractors have wasted trillions through fraud and corruptionShocking report exposes how US defense contractors have wasted trillions through fraud and corruption

Ministries and state bodies are also apportioned according to factional lines, further enhancing the capacity for nepotism. As such, muhasasa has contributed to the creation of a bloated civil service, whose salaries account for around a quarter of the country’s GDP, as ministries and key administrative bodies trade jobs and contracts for support

The state currently pays the salaries or pensions of some 11 million people (Iraq has a total population of 40 million), including half-a-million so-called ‘ghost workers’ who don’t work anywhere but still receive a salary. Reports from 2020 suggested that the government was paying around 400% more in salaries than it had been 15 years ago. 

Muhasasa was meant to prevent a single faction or ethnic group oppressing others in the way that Saddam had done, but Washington’s masterplan instead engendered a kind of political deadlock, whereby the divided parliament and its precariously positioned prime ministers struggled to deliver, even when they tried. As a result, it was no surprise mass protests erupted in 2019; the system wasn’t delivering

In May 2020, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi came to power in the wake of the protests (also known as the Tishreen or October movement) which prompted the collapse of the previous government. But while the former journalist and intelligence chief seemingly heard the call for an early ballot, he won’t be presiding over wholescale political and electoral reform. 

Al-Kadhimi has brought the 2022 election forward to this Sunday and has overseen some electoral reform, but critics, of which there are many, contend this reform doesn’t go anywhere near far enough and may further entrench the US-imposed muhasasa. 

Despite some headline reforms, the supposed improvements don’t address the failing system. In a change from the last election, Iraq’s fifth vote since the US conquest will see elections conducted in 83 multi-member local constituencies. Nine of the house’s 329 seats are reserved for minority groups, including five for Christians, and 25% of seats are reserved for women. 

 

The displeasure at the extent of the reforms is manifest in the widespread calls for Iraqis to boycott the election; even those who demanded the vote are split on whether to take part. However, universal abstention is likely to be avoided after Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the spiritual leader of the Iraqi Shia, issued a statement encouraging people to come forward and exercise their democratic right, despite the election’s “shortcomings.” 

Regardless of the electoral changes, experts and forecasters are predicting more of the same; a divided parliament in which no party comes even close to having a majority. Newcomers from the Tishreen movement could get between 18 and 26 seats, an impressive achievement considering the divided nature of the parliament, but only a fraction of the house’s 329 seats. 

So, despite this early election, the question remains: who, if anyone, is going to rid Iraq of this US-imposed system for democracy which has brought only deadlock and corruption. And, after all, al-Kadhimi’s leadership is a product of the power-sharing agreement in which the divided parliament was forced to elect not the best man for the job, but the candidate which was least offensive to all factions. Al-Kadhimi’s successor, unless he continues in the role after the election, will be chosen in the same fashion. 

It’s also worth remembering that many Iraqis have never known anything else. 

With more than 60% of the country’s population under the age of 25, many are too young to remember the Ba’athist years, a socialist regime which was at first characterized by soaring economic growth but also brutal repression, war and Saddam’s cult of personality. Instead, many Iraqis have grown up only experiencing intense factionalism, associated rampant corruption and misgovernance perpetuated by the US-imposed sectarian political system. For this youth, the Iraq rebuilt by the West offers very little unless things radically change. 

To add insult to injury, the US troops which oversaw Saddam’s fall from power and the creation of a new Iraq have still not left the country 18 years after they first arrived on the premise that the Ba’athist ruler had amassed Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs). Although, as we all know, no WMDs were ever found, leading some to wonder whether there was another reason for the Western invasion. 

 

Earlier this year, Baghdad and Washington agreed that all US combat troops would be withdrawn from the country by the end of the year. And on Thursday the Iraqi army confirmed that the mission to withdraw about 2,500 remaining US troops had finally begun.

But while Iraq may soon be free of American forces, it is unlikely that Iraqis will be able to shake off an ill-judged political system introduced by the US, which, as nearly two decades has shown us, serves only the few at the expense of the many. 

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

https://www.rt.com/op-ed/537052-america-iraq-election-failure/

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43 minutes ago, boosterbglee said:

Iraq is predictably unpredictable, they are in no hurry.  Not even close to logical that Afghanistan would have a better exchange rate than Iraq!  It’s just an opinions game at this point, I just want an RV before I’m done on this planet or before the planet is done with us!


Well stated :tiphat:I’d like to add one thing....just wanna get the RV before Ole Sleeping Muppet Joe gets around to telling everyone ( again ) it’s Patriotic to pay MORE TAXES, bleeding our investment of Major Gains with some new asinine tax hike.

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7 hours ago, Butifldrm said:

The dead hand of America: Iraq vote won’t solve the failures of West’s nation-building 18 years after Saddam’s removal

9 Oct, 2021 12:04
 

The dead hand of America: Iraq vote won’t solve the failures of West’s nation-building 18 years after Saddam’s removal

SHARIYA, IRAQ, on October 8, 2021. © AFP / Ismael ADNAN

By James Fox, a British journalist and writer at RT. He has written a doctoral thesis on local content in resource economies and has contributed to academic work on global supply chains.

Iraqis take to the polls on Sunday for an early election, however it promises to bring nothing but disappointment for the thousands who demanded it, as America’s failed nation-building project continues to underdeliver.

Two years ago, thousands of Iraqis took to the streets to demand an end to corruption, misgovernance and a sectarian political system, imposed by the United States after the fall of Saddam Hussein, that allows for the systematic plundering of the state and its national resources. 

The system, known as ‘muhasasa,’ was developed by Saddam’s opposition in exile in anticipation of a post-Ba’athist Iraq and was adopted by the conquering US forces who believed balancing sectarian demands would allow for the creation of a stable political settlement. 

But while muhasasa was devised to divvy up political positions and power on the basis of sectarian or ethnic quotas, it has become a cypher for politically sanctioned corruption and the continued enrichment of elites and their followers. 

READ MORE

Shocking report exposes how US defense contractors have wasted trillions through fraud and corruptionShocking report exposes how US defense contractors have wasted trillions through fraud and corruption

Ministries and state bodies are also apportioned according to factional lines, further enhancing the capacity for nepotism. As such, muhasasa has contributed to the creation of a bloated civil service, whose salaries account for around a quarter of the country’s GDP, as ministries and key administrative bodies trade jobs and contracts for support system" rel="">support. 

The state currently pays the salaries or pensions of some 11 million people (Iraq has a total population of 40 million), including half-a-million so-called ‘ghost workers’ who don’t work anywhere but still receive a salary. Reports from 2020 suggested that the government was paying around 400% more in salaries than it had been 15 years ago. 

Muhasasa was meant to prevent a single faction or ethnic group oppressing others in the way that Saddam had done, but Washington’s masterplan instead engendered a kind of political deadlock, whereby the divided parliament and its precariously positioned prime ministers struggled to deliver, even when they tried. As a result, it was no surprise mass protests erupted in 2019; the system wasn’t delivering

In May 2020, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi came to power in the wake of the protests (also known as the Tishreen or October movement) which prompted the collapse of the previous government. But while the former journalist and intelligence chief seemingly heard the call for an early ballot, he won’t be presiding over wholescale political and electoral reform. 

Al-Kadhimi has brought the 2022 election forward to this Sunday and has overseen some electoral reform, but critics, of which there are many, contend this reform doesn’t go anywhere near far enough and may further entrench the US-imposed muhasasa. 

Despite some headline reforms, the supposed improvements don’t address the failing system. In a change from the last election, Iraq’s fifth vote since the US conquest will see elections conducted in 83 multi-member local constituencies. Nine of the house’s 329 seats are reserved for minority groups, including five for Christians, and 25% of seats are reserved for women. 

 

The displeasure at the extent of the reforms is manifest in the widespread calls for Iraqis to boycott the election; even those who demanded the vote are split on whether to take part. However, universal abstention is likely to be avoided after Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the spiritual leader of the Iraqi Shia, issued a statement encouraging people to come forward and exercise their democratic right, despite the election’s “shortcomings.” 

Regardless of the electoral changes, experts and forecasters are predicting more of the same; a divided parliament in which no party comes even close to having a majority. Newcomers from the Tishreen movement could get between 18 and 26 seats, an impressive achievement considering the divided nature of the parliament, but only a fraction of the house’s 329 seats. 

So, despite this early election, the question remains: who, if anyone, is going to rid Iraq of this US-imposed system for democracy which has brought only deadlock and corruption. And, after all, al-Kadhimi’s leadership is a product of the power-sharing agreement in which the divided parliament was forced to elect not the best man for the job, but the candidate which was least offensive to all factions. Al-Kadhimi’s successor, unless he continues in the role after the election, will be chosen in the same fashion. 

It’s also worth remembering that many Iraqis have never known anything else. 

With more than 60% of the country’s population under the age of 25, many are too young to remember the Ba’athist years, a socialist regime which was at first characterized by soaring economic growth but also brutal repression, war and Saddam’s cult of personality. Instead, many Iraqis have grown up only experiencing intense factionalism, associated rampant corruption and misgovernance perpetuated by the US-imposed sectarian political system. For this youth, the Iraq rebuilt by the West offers very little unless things radically change. 

To add insult to injury, the US troops which oversaw Saddam’s fall from power and the creation of a new Iraq have still not left the country 18 years after they first arrived on the premise that the Ba’athist ruler had amassed Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs). Although, as we all know, no WMDs were ever found, leading some to wonder whether there was another reason for the Western invasion. 

 

Earlier this year, Baghdad and Washington agreed that all US combat troops would be withdrawn from the country by the end of the year. And on Thursday the Iraqi army confirmed that the mission to withdraw about 2,500 remaining US troops had finally begun.

But while Iraq may soon be free of American forces, it is unlikely that Iraqis will be able to shake off an ill-judged political system introduced by the US, which, as nearly two decades has shown us, serves only the few at the expense of the many. 

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

https://www.rt.com/op-ed/537052-america-iraq-election-failure/

The sad part of this story...wasting trillions of tax payer dollars... is what is not being said. About all the Americans that could have been helped, with all those trillions of dollars. And the soldiers whose lives were lost, the wives that lost a husband, the kids that lost a dad. The only "nation building" America should be doing now, is at home.

 

What was it really about? It is mostly rich Americans getting richer, if they own stock in war manufacturers. Crazy.

 

I hope people realize one of the obvious lessons here: As technology spreads around the world, wars are getting harder. I remember reading that in the early 1900s, the British moved into Egypt with a couple hundred soldiers, controlled the whole country. It worked because the Egyptians didn't have guns or telephones.  Now America had trouble controlling Iraq because they have lots of weapons, you don't need that much to fight back against even a great army like America has. When America leaves, Saddam 2.0 will take over. They just aren't up to democracy.

 

I thought America learned these simple lesson in Vietnam. I guess not. You can blow the crap out of a country, but controlling it with force? Occupying it? Imposing our values on them? That's a million times harder. Don't bother, especially if it's a country with a very different religion, like Afghanistan. Total waste of time.

 

Oh well, at least I'll make a few million out of this fiasco...President Trump warned us. He did an op-ed in a New York paper, before the war, saying don't bother going to war with Iraq, it's stupid. He told us why. He was right. The American elites didn't listen to him, so here we are, twenty years later, up to our knees in stupid.  Never thought I'd make money off the stupidity of the American elite, but now I think that's exactly what will happen. Wish it wasn't so, but I'll take the money. :bagofmoney:

 

Seriously, Americans are nice people. You sure deserve better leaders. 

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How conveniently we forget that Western Governments were/ are responsible for fall of Iraq. They are also not in the business of nation building. Afghanistan anyone? Death and Destruction is all they sow. The objective is not to win any endless wars but to prolong them for as long as they can while the Military Contractors and their Friends fill their pockets. Rebuilding Iraq will definitely not come from those who destroyed it but from those who have a vested interest in helping to rebuild it. China's BRI does include Iraq and is currently investing heavily in Iraq. The Nations of doom and destruction are actively trying to block this move by China. If successful, Iraq will remain a broken country with a Currency heavily Devalued and their Resources drained by the usual suspects. If China is able to raise Iraq out of the dust and help rebuild better then it will be a WIN WIN for the People of Iraq and it's Investors. This Option is the ONLY opportunity for their Currency to Revalue and a plausible outcome for us Dinarians. That's My Story and I'm sticking to it. 

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