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Comments on Managed Float of the Dinar


eosirl
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Walkingstick is allegedly working in Baghdad with the CBI and allegedly happens to be in meetings or knows the content of the meetings.
 
Here's an excerpt of what he is reportedly saying via Frank and my comments are afterwards.
 
4-14-2021   Newshound/Intel Guru Walkingstick   [via Guru Frank26]   Phase three:  They (the Fab 4/CBI) will keep a very tight band, a super tight band  on this international float.  Because they don't want it to move anymore than plus or minus 3%.  Then it will reach a cap...supply and demand will put the dinar on a different international level.
 
You and I were talking about how the dinar would be introduced on the market, fixed, float, managed float.  Well what Walkingstick is describing above is a 'managed float'. When he references a 'tight band' is in financial terms are the 'ceiling and floor'.  What it means is the dinar will only be allowed to move only freely 3% of its value between the ceiling and floor limits.  This is a cautious way to introduce a new world accepted currency. The ceiling will protect the currency from any abnormal demand to buy the dinar, (This means there isn't much room for a percentage increase in the dinar's value once introduced at a certain rate.  Depending on the percentage increase in value times the number of dinar you are holding may be substantial nevertheless.) And then the inverse is true when if there was a run to dump the dinar the floor limit would protect the dinar's value for us.  So, to me, that means no made rush to cash out as I am speaking in hours and days. Now these limits under the guidelines of the IMF and Iraq's volition, may be adjusted after 90 days, but not within the 90 days.   I am actually very please to hear of this development if true, it gives me more leeway to find a suitable investment vehicle for the gain received.
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6 minutes ago, eosirl said:
 
Walkingstick is allegedly working in Baghdad with the CBI and allegedly happens to be in meetings or knows the content of the meetings.
 
Here's an excerpt of what he is reportedly saying via Frank and my comments are afterwards.
 
4-14-2021   Newshound/Intel Guru Walkingstick   [via Guru Frank26]   Phase three:  They (the Fab 4/CBI) will keep a very tight band, a super tight band  on this international float.  Because they don't want it to move anymore than plus or minus 3%.  Then it will reach a cap...supply and demand will put the dinar on a different international level.
 
You and I were talking about how the dinar would be introduced on the market, fixed, float, managed float.  Well what Walkingstick is describing above is a 'managed float'. When he references a 'tight band' is in financial terms are the 'ceiling and floor'.  What it means is the dinar will only be allowed to move only freely 3% of its value between the ceiling and floor limits.  This is a cautious way to introduce a new world accepted currency. The ceiling will protect the currency from any abnormal demand to buy the dinar, (This means there isn't much room for a percentage increase in the dinar's value once introduced at a certain rate.  Depending on the percentage increase in value times the number of dinar you are holding may be substantial nevertheless.) And then the inverse is true when if there was a run to dump the dinar the floor limit would protect the dinar's value for us.  So, to me, that means no made rush to cash out as I am speaking in hours and days. Now these limits under the guidelines of the IMF and Iraq's volition, may be adjusted after 90 days, but not within the 90 days.   I am actually very please to hear of this development if true, it gives me more leeway to find a suitable investment vehicle for the gain received.

 

 

  Excellent breakdown eosirl. Thanks for taking the time to post.

 

Also I see your new to the site, so welcome aboard !!

 

   pp

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25 minutes ago, pokerplayer said:

 

 

  Excellent breakdown eosirl. Thanks for taking the time to post.

 

Also I see your new to the site, so welcome aboard !!

 

   pp

Thanks. While new to the board, old to the dinar wait. lol

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7 hours ago, DinarThug said:

Frank Sat On A WalkingStick ! :o 


And Now We Go To Our ‘Crack’ Sideline Reporter ‘Hugh Janus’ For A Deep Probing Anal’ysis Into Frankie’s Condition ! :o 

 

image.gif.f27e0b171560d6b4dd56f05a7363d336.gif


And It Appears That They Won’t Relent - Until They Get To The ‘Bottom’ Of This...

 

:D  :D  :D 

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Hi eosirl,

A couple of facts that may interest you. Talkingprick (tp) now lives in the US where he has been for several years. He allegedly has a form of advanced cancer and Frank appeals to his membership at his forum from time to time to support tp with cash donations to assist with his medical costs.

Frank both fascinates and frustrates me as he is the perfect definition of a narcissist and consequently, lies with such fluidity that you can never be sure when he is telling the truth.

I'll give a couple of quick example to illustrate this. In late 2019, tp claimed through Frank, that all contracts with foreign companies going forward would be secretly denominated in US dollars because these companies would never accept large quantities of Dinars as payment and in any event, the currency was not as yet recognised internationally. This intrigued me so I contacted the manager of a Dinar trading firm in my country (an Iraqi national) and explained what had been claimed by Frank. I finally persuaded this guy to contact a paternal uncle in Iraq who then occupied a middle management position at a prominent Iraqi bank. It was relayed back to me that said uncle completely rejected Frank's claim and stated that no such arrangement existed. I queried with my contact that perhaps his uncle had been sworn to secrecy but I was assured that immediate members in Iraqi families do not lie to each other as it is considered extremely disrespectful. So I was left with the only conclusion that Frank had simply made this claim up.

There are countless other cases where Frank makes what appear to be fanciful statements but just recently he has featured several phone conversations with fellow country men and women who tell elaborate stories of going to X or Y American bank (Wells Fargo is a favorite), where they, after advising they have a cache of Dinars, are then warmly embraced by a senior staff member, given preferential treatment and asked to stay in regular contact.

I live in a modern first world country in the Southern Hemisphere and immediately sought to test these claims in my country. I initially conversed with an employee at the Foreign Currency Trading desk of both HSBC and CitiBank as these are large international banks who also have a presence in the USA. Each employee patiently explained to me that the Dinar is considered an exotic currency, is not tradable outside of Iraq and their banks have no current interest in acquiring my Dinars.

Then I similarly approached personnel at the three largest banks in my country. These banks are considered internationally as mid sized banks and have branches in a number of other countries. The outcome of all my inquiries with these banks was exactly the same as my experience with HSBC and Citibank.

I could go on, but what is the point. Frank is the consummate story teller and I sometimes doubt that even he knows when he is telling the truth.

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Yes Frank is the devil.....but this site sure doesnt mind taking most of its articles that have been doused with a little coloring by him for years though.  

 

Of course if one brings out that info, they get branded a frankie disciple instead of looking at their own hypocrisy.  Or if you happen to be a newbie they try to rub that in your face as if that means something.  

 

See folks when an article is posted it is usually always in black lettering.  When they copy and paste it from franks site, his workers do the extra work of putting the coloring in to highlight stuff.  So any article that appears here is from his site that is in color.  No one here does the coloring.  It has already been done.  

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  • yota691 changed the title to Comments on Managed Float of the Dinar
20 hours ago, blackrobes said:

Hi eosirl,

A couple of facts that may interest you. Talkingprick (tp) now lives in the US where he has been for several years. He allegedly has a form of advanced cancer and Frank appeals to his membership at his forum from time to time to support system" rel="">support tp with cash donations to assist with his medical costs.

Frank both fascinates and frustrates me as he is the perfect definition of a narcissist and consequently, lies with such fluidity that you can never be sure when he is telling the truth.

I'll give a couple of quick example to illustrate this. In late 2019, tp claimed through Frank, that all contracts with foreign companies going forward would be secretly denominated in US dollars because these companies would never accept large quantities of Dinars as payment and in any event, the currency was not as yet recognised internationally. This intrigued me so I contacted the manager of a Dinar trading firm in my country (an Iraqi national) and explained what had been claimed by Frank. I finally persuaded this guy to contact a paternal uncle in Iraq who then occupied a middle management position at a prominent Iraqi bank. It was relayed back to me that said uncle completely rejected Frank's claim and stated that no such arrangement existed. I queried with my contact that perhaps his uncle had been sworn to secrecy but I was assured that immediate members in Iraqi families do not lie to each other as it is considered extremely disrespectful. So I was left with the only conclusion that Frank had simply made this claim up.

There are countless other cases where Frank makes what appear to be fanciful statements but just recently he has featured several phone conversations with fellow country men and women who tell elaborate stories of going to X or Y American bank (Wells Fargo is a favorite), where they, after advising they have a cache of Dinars, are then warmly embraced by a senior staff member, given preferential treatment and asked to stay in regular contact.

I live in a modern first world country in the Southern Hemisphere and immediately sought to test these claims in my country. I initially conversed with an employee at the Foreign Currency Trading desk of both HSBC and CitiBank as these are large international banks who also have a presence in the USA. Each employee patiently explained to me that the Dinar is considered an exotic currency, is not tradable outside of Iraq and their banks have no current interest in acquiring my Dinars.

Then I similarly approached personnel at the three largest banks in my country. These banks are considered internationally as mid sized banks and have branches in a number of other countries. The outcome of all my inquiries with these banks was exactly the same as my experience with HSBC and Citibank.

I could go on, but what is the point. Frank is the consummate story teller and I sometimes doubt that even he knows when he is telling the truth.

Hi Blackrobes,

Very nice to make your acquaintance.

 

I cannot find fault with what you have said above.

 

I once travelled to the Philippines on business on my return to the US, I had a few Pilipino notes left over, I approached my local banks to exchange and they refused to exchange it.  What I discovered it is the bank's discretion whether it chooses to exchange any particular currency or not.  And more so with exotic currencies. Why?  Simply exotic currencies are considered high risk due to the possibility of large swings in their exchange rate. The is called foreign exchange exposure, a risk any bank will try to minimize as do any business doing foreign trade. And understandably so.

In one of Frank's yoube tubbies, Frank was quoting an article that was an editorial to the CBI.  The headline of the article stated TO THE CBI....   Yet Frank during his presentation kept saying that the CBI was saying XYZ which was basically the content of the article.  But Frank was categorically wrong as the it was the author of the article publicly suggesting what the CBI should do.  When confronted with the contradiction by me, he couldn't apologize for his error, nor did he appreciate the correct comprehension of the article. Instead he chose to call me names as in that I was blind, as in the biblical reference of There are none so blind and those who can not see and then called my ignorant and uneducated. LOL This is how narcists behave when threatened is to discredit the person in question. He quickly moved on realizing his inability to comprehend the article.  I drew the conclusion, while have had resources at his finger tips, he comprehension isn't quite there, perhaps due to a lack of preparation.  Nevertheless to each his own and lessons are learned

 

Now what Frank didn't know was ... I have a bachelors' degree in International Finance, I have studied accounting and the role of banks, central banks, and currency boards. I know the use of currency auctions versus a market quoted currency as you see on the forex. For homework I would have to account for a company's foreign exchange exposure in its business on certain critical days during a year or month. I am somewhat better educated in terms of international finance than Frank, but like most people I still have room to learn. So basically Frank was wrong about me, namely because he doesn't know me.

 

Now here's what I see that causes invalid arguments in logic -

The fallacy of Composition - What's true for the one is true for the all. 

The fallacy of Division - What's true for the all is true for the one.

The fallacy of Cause and Effect - when someone makes an argument but the argument is based on false or illogical reasoning. Confusing Cause and Effect is a fallacy that occurs when someone claims that because two things typically occur together that one causes the other. 

 

I see these illogical arguments permeate through out deadland and it behooves anyone who doesn't understand these to research and watch out for them.

 

The last thing that I see is that Hyperbole is used to exaggerate overly a not so important point. Advertisements do this to create the need to buy and thus a sale.

 

In the end, it's buyer beware to whom you listen. 

 

As for the banks not commenting on the dinar's potential. It is not their place to comment and so I am not surprised that they wouldn't put themselves in a precarious position subject to legal recourse by authorities for inside indiscretions. As to the veracity of the banking stories they do have a common element that the bank employees never says, the dinar is going to revalue on x date at y amount. I have no doubt that perhaps some very high executives might be aware of the possibility of a dinar change in value, in order to accommodate the change. But how much of a notice, I do not  know. 

 

I didn't mean to rant on...but wanted to share my understanding that's all

 

 

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12 hours ago, PrehistoricMan said:

See folks when an article is posted it is usually always in black lettering.  When they copy and paste it from franks site, his workers do the extra work of putting the coloring in to highlight stuff.  So any article that appears here is from his site that is in color.  No one here does the coloring.  It has already been done.  

The over use of highlighting drives me up the wall and down again.  I don't think they ever heard of 'less is more' 

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50 minutes ago, eosirl said:

The over use of highlighting drives me up the wall and down again.  I don't think they ever heard of 'less is more' 

I dont mind it myself.  IF the highlighted points are important for us to know that we might miss if it was just in all black lettering.  I appreciate it.  

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eosirl,

 

Thank you for your balanced, dare I say nuanced response to my posting above.

 

I wish I could PM you as I have sensitive, personal information of which some parts I could share with you but as it relates to my circumstances I am not prepared to publicly post it. However in reference to your second last paragraph in which you state that bank employees do not (or perhaps are not allowed to), comment when a member of the public presents a foreign currency with a view to selling it; a few years ago I established a casual, business relationship with a trader at one prominent bank's currency trading desk. We stay in touch occasionally and he has always been up front with me.  In short, I believe he is genuinely interested in negotiating with me if and when the Dinar becomes internationally tradable. I acknowledge that this fits the mould of a 'bank story' so anyone reading these comments is free to either believe or disbelieve me. (insert silly smiling emoticon)

 

Secondly, a couple of years ago I used to volunteer at a major private hospital in my home city and shuttle patients and visitors around the campus via. a golf buggy. On one occasion, my sole passenger and I began a friendly banter and in it he disclosed that he was senior figure in off-shore and international banking. I took my chance and asked for his views on the Iraqi Dinar. He seemed naturally interested and in our short discourse said 'hang on to your holding as it will see you right one day soon.' I interpreted his remarks as a personal affirmation that I was on the right course in buying and holding Dinars. (see my disclaimer above re. believability)

 

The above said I do go through ups and downs occasionally and question whether Iraq will ever get itself sorted out. The country is riven with corruption at all levels and divided by tribal and religious schisms. Further, just because Kuwait's currency is highly valued there is no reason to arbitrarily assume that Iraq will ever arrive at a similar currency value compared to the American dollar.

 

In conclusion, I would dearly love to subscribe to a knowledgeable expert who from time to time could pierce the veil of Iraqi politics and society to offer insight on the countries progress particularly as it relates to real growth in value of its currency.

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Blackrobes, I am impressed and absorbed in your comments and those of Eosirl. I see that you both are either fairly new to DV or don't post comments very often. Either way, yours is a voice of reason and makes much sense. I hope to hear/read your comments or opinions in the future. Please let us hear your comments more often.

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15 hours ago, blackrobes said:

eosirl,

 

Thank you for your balanced, dare I say nuanced response to my posting above.

 

I wish I could PM you as I have sensitive, personal information of which some parts I could share with you but as it relates to my circumstances I am not prepared to publicly post it. However in reference to your second last paragraph in which you state that bank employees do not (or perhaps are not allowed to), comment when a member of the public presents a foreign currency with a view to selling it; a few years ago I established a casual, business relationship with a trader at one prominent bank's currency trading desk. We stay in touch occasionally and he has always been up front with me.  In short, I believe he is genuinely interested in negotiating with me if and when the Dinar becomes internationally tradable. I acknowledge that this fits the mould of a 'bank story' so anyone reading these comments is free to either believe or disbelieve me. (insert silly smiling emoticon)

 

Secondly, a couple of years ago I used to volunteer at a major private hospital in my home city and shuttle patients and visitors around the campus via. a golf buggy. On one occasion, my sole passenger and I began a friendly banter and in it he disclosed that he was senior figure in off-shore and international banking. I took my chance and asked for his views on the Iraqi Dinar. He seemed naturally interested and in our short discourse said 'hang on to your holding as it will see you right one day soon.' I interpreted his remarks as a personal affirmation that I was on the right course in buying and holding Dinars. (see my disclaimer above re. believability)

 

The above said I do go through ups and downs occasionally and question whether Iraq will ever get itself sorted out. The country is riven with corruption at all levels and divided by tribal and religious schisms. Further, just because Kuwait's currency is highly valued there is no reason to arbitrarily assume that Iraq will ever arrive at a similar currency value compared to the American dollar.

 

In conclusion, I would dearly love to subscribe to a knowledgeable expert who from time to time could pierce the veil of Iraqi politics and society to offer insight on the countries progress particularly as it relates to real growth in value of its currency.

In my limited experience in forex currency trading, I learned one main principle and that was, you need to know when to enter a trade and more importantly know when to exit a trade and nab the gain.  The downfall to that principle are emotional decisions.  Don't trade on emotion, trade with critical a financial decision. There are numerous analytical tools to help you make a rational exit. One of my favorites is the Fibonacci tool.  If anyone isn't familiar with it, it would be to your benefit to read up on it in the context of forex trading.

 

So I can hear you say -  when am you going to exit.  For me my exit of holding dinar is when and IF it comes on the Forex at the current rate and the financial tools demonstrate no interest in the dinar by the forex traders worldwide which would be evident in the forex graphs.  That's my out.  However, I don't think Iraq would  miss the opportunity to have their country's assets and debt reevaluated as well as its political stability to determine a more accurate value for its currency when it introduces it to the world market. 

 

I too wish I could PM you Blackrobes as I have some interesting facts that I have gleaned over the years that the main gurus missed or forgotten but again it's sensitive in nature.  

 

In your comment "Further, just because Kuwait's currency is highly valued there is no reason to arbitrarily assume that Iraq will ever arrive at a similar currency value compared to the American dollar." Is the perfect example of the fallacy of cause and effect.  The cause - because Kuwait's currency is high, the effect - Iraq will be high too.  The argument is illogical (sounds like and Mr. Spock comment).  However, that doesn't mean Iraq's dinar can't reach a similar value.  

 

In reference to your last paragraph, it would be a gem to have someone to get an accurate insight into the future of Iraq but I think in reality it's difficult as all the shenanigans of corruption have muddied the financial waters and so reduces the accuracy, nevertheless we live in hope.

 

Anyways, good chatting with you.

 

 

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@eosirlThanks for your post.

 

I believe a managed float is possible, as you said, this is a cautious way to introduce a new world accepted currency.

 

It will give them time to diversify and develop the economy.

 

This was posted today.

 

2021-04-19 06:28

Shafaq News / The appearance of Muhammad Salih, Advisor to the Prime Minister for Financial and Economic Affairs, confirmed on Monday that it is not permissible to float the currency in Iraq, indicating that this leads to the collapse of the market.

Saleh said in an interview with Shafaq News; It is "not permissible to float the currency in Iraq because the market will collapse in this case," indicating that "the entry and exit of hard currency does not enter the market, which is only an exit for it, but the government is the one that brings this hard currency."

 

Saleh added, "If the government withdraws its hand, the supply will stop and the demand increases, and thus the market will collapse," stressing that "the float takes place in economies in which supply and demand come from the market and that the state enters to buy and sell to create a balance in the price with its reserves."

He pointed out that "the problem in Iraq is that the market is demanding and that the state is offering, and in the event that the Central Bank does not sell the dollar, it means that all the supply has stopped and there is no other offer, and if there is another offer, it is a little offer that is not enough to meet the demand and therefore the prices will rise." Because demand will be more than supply. "

He stressed that "the state is the bidder in Iraq, and therefore if the state tends to float, then this means there is no supply, and thus prices collapse."

Floating currency is completely liberalizing the exchange rate, so the government or the central bank does not interfere in determining it directly, but rather it is secreted automatically in the currency market through the supply and demand mechanism that allows setting the national currency exchange rate against foreign currencies.

It is noteworthy that some officials talk from time to time on the need to float and liberalize the currency to maintain hard currency reserves at the Central Bank.

 

As you can see in the article the PM financial advisor didn’t mention a managed float. He’s referring to a full float.

 

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52 minutes ago, Laid Back said:

@eosirlThanks for your post.

 

I believe a managed float is possible, as you said, this is a cautious way to introduce a new world accepted currency.

 

It will give them time to diversify and develop the economy.

 

This was posted today.

 

2021-04-19 06:28

Shafaq News / The appearance of Muhammad Salih, Advisor to the Prime Minister for Financial and Economic Affairs, confirmed on Monday that it is not permissible to float the currency in Iraq, indicating that this leads to the collapse of the market.

Saleh said in an interview with Shafaq News; It is "not permissible to float the currency in Iraq because the market will collapse in this case," indicating that "the entry and exit of hard currency does not enter the market, which is only an exit for it, but the government is the one that brings this hard currency."

 

Saleh added, "If the government withdraws its hand, the supply will stop and the demand increases, and thus the market will collapse," stressing that "the float takes place in economies in which supply and demand come from the market and that the state enters to buy and sell to create a balance in the price with its reserves."

He pointed out that "the problem in Iraq is that the market is demanding and that the state is offering, and in the event that the Central Bank does not sell the dollar, it means that all the supply has stopped and there is no other offer, and if there is another offer, it is a little offer that is not enough to meet the demand and therefore the prices will rise." Because demand will be more than supply. "

He stressed that "the state is the bidder in Iraq, and therefore if the state tends to float, then this means there is no supply, and thus prices collapse."

Floating currency is completely liberalizing the exchange rate, so the government or the central bank does not interfere in determining it directly, but rather it is secreted automatically in the currency market through the supply and demand mechanism that allows setting the national currency exchange rate against foreign currencies.

It is noteworthy that some officials talk from time to time on the need to float and liberalize the currency to maintain hard currency reserves at the Central Bank.

 

As you can see in the article the PM financial advisor didn’t mention a managed float. He’s referring to a full float.

 

Yes, it was Walkingstick via Frank that suggest the narrow band of trading, no mention if any Iraqi official, in a pertinent position, offered the same strategy. While Saleh discusses the simplistic approach of a currency's value being dependent on the Supply and Demand in reality, the factors behind the valuation of a country's currency is far more complex than supply and demand, but rather the country's current accounts, the ability to pay its debts, its assets, its political stability, its reserves, both fx currency held by the CBI, and in the case of Iraq, its oil reserves indicative of future revenue, all should contribute to an evaluation of the dinar's forex rate.  Iraq fear the Dutch effect which happened to the Netherlands when it discovered oil. The value of its currency rose and the price of goods rose within the country, making its exports more expensive and thus less demand. Inflation and slowing of exports would be disastrous for Iraq. A float of the dinar with no safety measures is in essence a gamble. Fixed to a single currency or to a basket of currencies in which each chosen currency had a percentage ratio, or a managed float, all seem doable strategies for Iraq.

In my opinion Iraq will have a more Goldilocks approach neither too high or too low.

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5 minutes ago, eosirl said:

Yes, it was Walkingstick via Frank that suggest the narrow band of trading, no mention if any Iraqi official, in a pertinent position, offered the same strategy. While Saleh discusses the simplistic approach of a currency's value being dependent on the Supply and Demand in reality, the factors behind the valuation of a country's currency is far more complex than supply and demand, but rather the country's current accounts, the ability to pay its debts, its assets, its political stability, its reserves, both fx currency held by the CBI, and in the case of Iraq, its oil reserves indicative of future revenue, all should contribute to an evaluation of the dinar's forex rate.  Iraq fear the Dutch effect which happened to the Netherlands when it discovered oil. The value of its currency rose and the price of goods rose within the country, making its exports more expensive and thus less demand. Inflation and slowing of exports would be disastrous for Iraq. A float of the dinar with no safety measures is in essence a gamble. Fixed to a single currency or to a basket of currencies in which each chosen currency had a percentage ratio, or a managed float, all seem doable strategies for Iraq.

In my opinion Iraq will have a more Goldilocks approach neither too high or too low.

 

3 minutes ago, eosirl said:

Forgot to mention, that the tone of the article is negative towards an unregulated Float which market forces determine the dinar's trading rate.  

 

Thanks eosirl, great explanation 🙏🏼😀

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"I wish I could PM you as I have sensitive, personal information of which some parts I could share with you but as it relates to my circumstances I am not prepared to publicly post it."

 

Blackrobes, per your quote above, why would you want to share "sensitive, personal information" with Eosirl, who you just came into contact with here, but not the rest of us? At this point we are all strangers to you. Perhaps you two have a kismet, synchronistic type relationship since you both are new here, each have 12 posts, and seem to have similar objectives. Wow! Not to say you should not be careful even in a synchronistic relationship because the charlatans and guru wannabes are always out there in Dinar World. Nobody wants to be a sucker.

 

Does anyone know the whereabouts of Mountain Goat? Maybe I have just missed her posts. Her stories were always intriguing and fun to read. She's probably just living the dream up on that Austrian mountain with her goats with a hot line to the CBI. Who would have guessed.

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4 hours ago, Carrello said:

"I wish I could PM you as I have sensitive, personal information of which some parts I could share with you but as it relates to my circumstances I am not prepared to publicly post it."

 

Blackrobes, per your quote above, why would you want to share "sensitive, personal information" with Eosirl, who you just came into contact with here, but not the rest of us? At this point we are all strangers to you. Perhaps you two have a kismet, synchronistic type relationship since you both are new here, each have 12 posts, and seem to have similar objectives. Wow! Not to say you should not be careful even in a synchronistic relationship because the charlatans and guru wannabes are always out there in Dinar World. Nobody wants to be a sucker.

 

Carrello,

 

For the absolute record, I have no idea who Blackrobes is, other than the fact he/she claims to live in the southern hemisphere and I live in the northern hemisphere. I can assure we are not neighbors. The fact we have 12 posts each has is nothing more than coincidental and it apparently feeds your paranoia. You are the perfect example of why anyone with a bit of knowledge of the subject of international finance are reluctant to engage with forum trolls. While you are annoyed that someone with some information doesn't want to share that information with you, upsets you. Perhaps the rumor section is better suited for your reading material.  Like everyone else on here (12 posts or not) are entitled to their opinion, which obviously includes you as we can see from your post. If you don't like what you read, then move on. For others who would like a more in-depth, thoughtful, analytical, and non-hyperbolic read, they are so welcome to read my comment. 

I am not here to convince anyone of my thoughts, that's up them. One thing is for sure, you have a bunch of sour grapes, and you are throwing them at the wrong person.

As for the gurus I let them have their voice without my criticism, in the end, it's who you wish to listen to that will educate you or lead you where they want to.

 

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5 hours ago, Carrello said:

"I wish I could PM you as I have sensitive, personal information of which some parts I could share with you but as it relates to my circumstances I am not prepared to publicly post it."

 

Blackrobes, per your quote above, why would you want to share "sensitive, personal information" with Eosirl, who you just came into contact with here, but not the rest of us? At this point we are all strangers to you. Perhaps you two have a kismet, synchronistic type relationship since you both are new here, each have 12 posts, and seem to have similar objectives. Wow! Not to say you should not be careful even in a synchronistic relationship because the charlatans and guru wannabes are always out there in Dinar World. Nobody wants to be a sucker.

 

Does anyone know the whereabouts of Mountain Goat? Maybe I have just missed her posts. Her stories were always intriguing and fun to read. She's probably just living the dream up on that Austrian mountain with her goats with a hot line to the CBI. Who would have guessed.

Go to google and type her name in.  She has her own site now.  

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