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Mike Lindell Just Released A New Bombshell Documentary: ‘Scientific Proof’ & It’s Devastating For Biden


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Breaking: Mike Lindell Just Released A New Bombshell Documentary: ‘Scientific Proof’ & It’s Devastating For Biden

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Earlier today we received word that the iconic founder of MyPillow and election integrity crusader, Mike Lindell, has just released a new documentary film about the 2020 election.  This documentary is a follow up the Mike’s first film ‘Absolute Proof’.  ‘Absolute Proof’ was a HUGE success with some reports suggesting that it has been viewed well over 100 million times!

 

Mike’s new film is called ‘Scientific Proof: Internationally Renowned Physicist Absolutely Proves 2020 Election Was Biggest Cyber-Crime in World History’ and features a wold renowned Physicist who breaks down the data from the 2020 election and comes to a terrifying conclusion …

 

Before you read the information that Mike’s team asked us to share with you, please take a moment to think about the fact that Mike Lindell is literally risking not only his fortune, but his LIFE, to get this information to you.  Speaking out in defense of election integrity has cost MyPillow dozens of retailers.  The Cancel Culture Mob is doing everything they can to bankrupt and silence Mike.

 

Thanks to the Marxist’s efforts to destroy his business, Mike gave us the promo code OUR45 for our readers to use at www.MyPillow.com.  OUR45 will save you up to 66% OFF your purchase and will help support Mike and his work to expose what actually happened in the 2020 election.

 

OK … here is the news from Lindell.tv … Remember, you can WATCH THE NEW DOCUMENTARY HERE

 

Via Lindell.tv: ‘On March 31st, Mike Lindell, the CEO of MyPillow, released a one-hour television special entitled, Scientific Proof: Internationally Renowned Physicist Absolutely Proves 2020 Election Was Biggest Cyber-Crime in World History.

 

The special broadcast features Dr. Douglas Frank who holds a Ph.D in Surface Analytical Chemistry for the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Frank is an internationally recognized scientist with over fifty scientific publications. In 1990 Dr. Frank discovered and invented a technique for creating three dimensional images of molecules resting on surfaces. This led to a cover article in Science Magazine, which is the most read science magazine in the world by scientists, and he was on the cover of the Naturwissenschaften, in Europe.

 

MyPillow-Communism-support-mike.jpg

 

Dr. Frank has spent countless hours since the 2020 election following the data of the election returns county by county across such states as Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Colorado to name a few. Dr. Frank’s scientific and mathematical investigation has revealed that there was absolutely massive cyber fraud in the 2020 election.

 

WATCH THE FILM HERE

 

In the television special Dr. Frank testifies to host Mike Lindell that deviations and mathematical impossibilities could not have been done by humans, by artificial intelligence and computers that were running before, during, and after the 2020 U.S. election.

 

Dr. Frank’s investigation reveals that the 2010 national census data was used to manipulate the 2020 election rolls and to inject phantom votes into the election totals. His scientific investigation documented and proved that numerous states throughout America had more people voting than lived in many of the counties.

 

The injection of the 2010 national census data into the 2020 election rolls facilitated a crime that some experts are calling the largest cyber-crime in world history.

 

WATCH THE FILM HERE

 

Dr. Frank explains that the 2010 census was used to actually cast votes for voters that had either passed away or no longer lived in the county or state.

 

In numerous documented cases, voters showed up to vote at their precinct only to be told they had already voted, when in fact, they had not voted. What is now being revealed by the scientific investigation of Dr. Frank is that these Americans had their vote cast for them through a highly sophisticated computer program.

 

In this television special, Dr. Frank explains to Mike Lindell what tipped him off that a cyber-crime had been committed — not in just a few precincts, counties or swing states, but on a national basis. Dr. Frank also reveals that even in the states President Trump won, the President won those states by larger numbers than was reported.

 

WATCH THE FILM HERE

 

Scientific Proof is the follow up to the two hour docuMovie, Absolute Proof, that was released on February 5, 2021, and was seen by 70 million people in the first four days of its release, and over 150 million to date across 42 countries. Like Absolute Proof, the executive producers of Scientific Proof are Mike Lindell, Brannon Howse and Mary Fanning and was filmed by WVW Broadcast Network, and directed by Brannon Howse.

 

To watch the one hour special Scientific Proof now, simply go to lindelltv.com or follow THIS LINK.

All media inquiries can be emailed to mediainquiry@mypillow.com

 

 

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And here you are putting all your faith and trust in the secular media and a socialist party that couldn't care less where they are heading, all because Orange Man is bad.  Go figure.    

Shabs - 81 million didn't cast their votes - too many duplicate, dogs, dead and illegals - none of which should matter or be counted. China joe was not voted in - he cheated his way in. 

Remember 30% of those votes were actually for President Trump, the other 10-20% that Biden got were from Vacant lots, dead people, teenagers, illegal immigrants, prisoners, absent college students and

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Dominion v. MyPillow Guy poses a stark test for America's libel laws

 
 
Roger Parloff
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Tue, April 13, 2021, 5:06 AM
 
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“Instantly,” said Steven Bellovin, a professor of computer science at Columbia University with almost 40 years of experience in computer networking and security.

That’s how long it took him to realize, he said in an interview, that a certain purported spreadsheet that I showed him was “not just fake, but a badly generated fake by someone who didn’t know what they were doing.”

The spreadsheet, together with an animated film that was said to illustrate its data, formed the crux of a nearly two-hour “docu-movie,” called “Absolute Proof,” which aired at least 13 times last February on the One America News Network. The movie, presented in a news magazine format, was hosted, co-produced, and relentlessly flacked by Mike Lindell, the irrepressible CEO of MyPillow, Inc. It purported to furnish absolute proof that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from then-President Donald Trump in an international cyberattack exploiting vulnerabilities in voting-machine software that had been intentionally designed to rig elections.

Dominion Voting Systems, which makes voting technology, filed a $1.3 billion defamation suit against Lindell and his company in late February—the third of four massive cases it has filed since the election—in part because of “Absolute Proof,” which referenced Dominion more than 40 times. (An in-depth analysis of Dominion’s suits over bogus election-fraud claims, as well as one brought by a rival voting-device company, Smartmatic, is provided in an earlier story I wrote here.)

Compared to the other defendants Dominion has sued— Trump’s former personal attorney Rudolph Giuliani; so-called Kraken lawyer Sidney Powell; and conservative news goliath Fox News Network—the MyPillow Guy might seem like a quirky afterthought.

My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell laughs during a Ò
 
My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell laughs during a Ò"Keep Iowa Great" press conference in Des Moines, IA, on February 3, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

He’s not, though. With a reported net worth of $300 million, Lindell, 59, is the most deep-pocketed of the non-media defendants, a major funder of conservative media generally, and a crucial underwriter of election-fraud myths in particular. Most notably, he sponsored Women for America First’s “March for Trump” bus tour—using a red bus emblazoned with a MyPillow logo—which staged stop-the-steal rallies in 20 cities from late November through early January. The tour culminated in the Save America Rally of Jan. 6, where Trump spoke and from which thousands of attendees peeled away to launch the deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol.

Lindell’s case is also intriguing for another reason, which is the focus of this article. It poses a particularly stark test of how our libel laws—which require that the defendant be shown to actually know or strongly suspect the falsity of his or her statements—play out when the defendant is a conspiracy theorist who seems beyond the reach of rational persuasion. In essence, it poses the question of whether, in a libel suit—which is a civil case—a defense lawyer could argue something akin to the insanity defense that exists in criminal cases. This story seeks to plumb Lindell’s highly atypical psyche to imagine how a jury might view his singular case, given our libel law’s steep and subjective criteria for liability.

“Completely and totally fabricated”

The spreadsheet that lay at the heart of “Absolute Proof” purported to document a massive, international cyberattack on U.S. election tabulation devices last November originating mainly from China, but also from Iran, Czech Republic, and an assortment of other countries. It further purported to identify each individual computer used by the hackers in those foreign countries as well as each targeted U.S. voting tabulator in 2,995 American counties, which were each supposedly identified by something known as a “media access control” address. The spreadsheet even claimed to report the actual number of votes “stolen” during each intrusion—i.e., switched from then-President Trump’s column to that of now-President Joe Biden. If not for these thefts, the spreadsheet data indicated, Trump would have won the election.

Months before the movie was released, of course, essentially every credible authority in the country had already pronounced the elections fair and secure, including Trump-appointed Attorney General Bill Barr and Trump-appointed Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency director Chris Krebs. If those weren’t sufficient red flags to give Lindell pause, Dominion had also sent him a four-page cease-and-desist letter on Dec. 23; a five-page retraction demand with 61 pages of exhibits on Jan. 8; and a 12-page letter on Feb. 4 specifically debunking aspects of the “spreadsheet” in question. (By then, a page of the spreadsheet had already surfaced on a weird internet conspiracy site and Lindell had begun touting it on his Twitter account.)

Lindell plunged forward with the movie anyway.

“I feel unclean just having watched those 13 minutes,” Bellovin wrote me in an email, referring to the critical segment of the movie displaying the supposed “proof” of the cyber-attack.

“This is completely and totally fabricated,” he continued in an interview the next day. “The technical details make no sense whatsoever. The network addresses are impossible . . . and the tradecraft is completely wrong. So it’s all bull.”

Three other computer or election security experts interviewed reached similar conclusions, although they sometimes homed in on different features of the spreadsheet in terms of what struck them as the most preposterous. (In nearly every state some pointed out, the official vote is a durable paper ballot, incapable of being altered by computer hackers. In addition, the vast majority of states keep vote tabulators “air-gapped,” i.e., never hooked up to modems for any purpose.)

My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listens during the daily coronavirus (COVID-19) response briefing in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
 
My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell speaks as then-U.S. President Donald Trump listens during the daily coronavirus (COVID-19) response briefing in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

What’s Lindell’s answer to this?

“Well, you’ve talked to the wrong people,” he told me in an interview last week. “I’ve spent the last month validating the IP addresses and the IDs of the computers, even over in China, and here in the U.S.”

Lindell appeared to acknowledge that there was some sort of flaw in the tabulator addresses shown in the movie—but suggested that that had been done intentionally for benign reasons.

“The ones you've seen in ‘Absolute Proof’—there was a digit that was off there,” he said. “So we didn't want people going—destroying the machines, destroying the computers. So I'm sure that's what they're probably trying to say to you."

“But it doesn't matter to me what they say,” he continued, his words spilling over each other at a speed that even a recording device could barely keep up with. “I’ve got all the cyber evidence.” He will soon be launching a new social media platform, he asserted—to be called “Frank”—where “we’re going to be dumping evidence to the world.” (Lindell was kicked off Twitter on Jan. 26, for propagating election-fraud myths, and MyPillow’s corporate account was ejected on Feb. 2.)

As for Dominion’s suit against him, Lindell said “we’re getting it removed next week [and] taken down as frivolous.”

Lindell then added—as has previously been reported—that he would soon be filing two lawsuits of his own, one against Dominion and a second which “is going directly to the Supreme Court” where “they’re going to take down this election” by a “nine-zero vote.” Trump will be back in office “by August,” he averred.

A spokesperson for Dominion declined comment beyond the company’s original statement when it filed the suit: "Despite repeated warnings and efforts to share the facts with him, Mr. Lindell has continued to maliciously spread false claims about Dominion, each time giving empty assurances that he would come forward with overwhelming proof. These claims have caused irreparable harm to Dominion’s good reputation and threatened the safety of our employees and customers. Moreover, Mr. Lindell's lies have undermined trust in American democracy and tarnished the hard work of local election officials.”

Is lunacy a defense to libel?

The seminal work on political conspiracy theorists is the late historian Richard Hofstadter’s “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” first published as an essay in Harpers in 1964. By choosing the word “style,” Hofstadter largely side-stepped speculation—beyond his credentials—about the precise mental state of the people he was chronicling. These included the folks who, over the centuries, saw elaborate, dastardly, and highly implausible plots being hatched by such presumed villains as Bavarian Illuminati, Free Masons, Jesuits, and—in some circles in the 1950s—such putative crypto-communists as Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and even President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Do such conspiracy theorists share any psychic disposition? A personality disorder? A mental illness? For the most part, Hofstadter didn’t go there.

My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell applauds as he awaits the arrival of U.S. President Donald Trump on the convention floor after delegates voted to confirm the president as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee for re-election on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., August 24, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
 
My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell applauds as he awaits the arrival of U.S. President Donald Trump on the convention floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., August 24, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

But there’s no side-stepping state of mind in a defamation suit. In the U.S., a “public figure” who brings a libel case—and Dominion will likely be considered a public figure—must show “actual malice” to prevail, which is a subjective standard, the Supreme Court has held. The question is not whether the defendant should have known whether his reputation-damaging statements were false, but whether he actually did know they were false, or at least harbored “serious doubts” about their truth.

Does that mean that lunacy is a defense?

“You know I got your email,” said David Schulz in an interview, “and I had to stop and scratch my head a minute, because it’s a really difficult question.” A media lawyer for 35 years, Schulz is senior counsel at Ballard Spahr and the Floyd Abrams clinical lecturer at Yale Law School. “I don’t know of any court that’s decided that.”

Such a defense would certainly be an extraordinary one, Schulz opined. “Unless they’re going to come in with some kind of expert psychiatric evidence to say [the defendant] really couldn’t understand this,” says Schulz, a jury is “highly unlikely” to be swayed by such a defense.

There are a number of doctrines and precedents, he adds, that, in a sense, almost smuggle an objective standard back into the picture, at least to the extent that they permit a jury to assess all the circumstances and conclude that the defendant must be lying. For instance, sticking to a preconceived narrative in the face of contrary facts can be evidence of “actual malice,” courts have found. So can a defendant’s “conscious avoidance” of evidence that cuts against his or her thesis, Schulz says.

“So it’s not enough to say, well, I didn’t know it was false,” he continues, “in the face of all these facts [weighing the other way]. . . . The jury can say, ‘We don’t believe you. No one would have believed this stuff.’”

On the other hand, juries are wild cards. What if the jury itself includes a conspiracy theorist or two? (In federal court, where the case against Lindell has been filed, civil jury verdicts must be unanimous unless the parties stipulate otherwise.)

From crack addict to CEO

In assessing Mike Lindell’s state of mind, we must briefly recap his truly incredible back story. For this purpose, we will rely on Lindell’s own (perfectly titled) autobiography, “What Are the Odds?”

In 1968, when Lindell was seven, his parents’ marriage broke up. His mother drove him and his sisters to Chaska, Minn.—where MyPillow is now based—to live in a trailer park.

As a kid, he was good in math, though he likely battled with undiagnosed ADHD, he writes. In high school he began drinking and gambling on sports. He survived multiple near-death experiences, by his telling, including smashing his stepfather’s pickup truck (he remembers overhearing an EMT pronouncing the words “no pulse”); getting “trapped under a sheet of ice in a lake”; being “electrocuted by a bolt of power so massive it shut down half the town”; and a skydiving accident in which he “smashed into the ground at 60 miles per hour because my parachute didn’t fully open.”

After graduating from high school in 1979, he went to the University of Minnesota “for about five minutes.” The 1980s were a blur of short-lived business ventures (pig farming; carpet-cleaning); some DUIs; tending bar; and miraculous escapes from ruinous gambling debts. In 1984, he became addicted to cocaine.

Nevertheless, he periodically managed to make some money through card-counting at blackjack in casinos. That art, requiring prodigious memory skills, involves keeping track of all the cards that have been dealt and then playing one’s hand in accordance with statistical probability tables that have been memorized. One must also be a good actor, concealing what one is doing from casino monitors, because the practice is forbidden.

In 1990 Lindell bought a bar. In 1999, his cocaine habit escalated into a crack cocaine addiction. In late 2003, in financial straits, he sold the bar.

Sometime in the spring of 2004, he woke up at 2 a.m. asking, “Where’s my pillow?” He decided to market a product called MyPillow. He settled on a fill (a mix of three foams and a proprietary additive), applied for a patent, set up a factory in a nearby former bus shed, and began selling MyPillows from a mall kiosk by that December.

DULUTH, MN - SEPTEMBER 30: Michael Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during a campaign rally for President Donald Trump at the Duluth International Airport on September 30, 2020 in Duluth, Minnesota. The rally is Trump's first after last night's Presidential Debate. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
 
DULUTH, MN - SEPTEMBER 30: Michael Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during a campaign rally for President Donald Trump at the Duluth International Airport on September 30, 2020 in Duluth, Minnesota. The rally is Trump's first after last night's Presidential Debate. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Life remained hard-scrabble. In 2007, his marriage of 20 years broke up.

Then, in February 2008, facing hard times again, he got a series of odd phone calls. Four strangers called, each asking only to pray with him. Then he got a fifth call on a line he used “only for internet access.” A “female and robotic” voice said: “Mike, this is a message from God. Everything you’ve experienced in your life will give you the strength to get through the next month.”

He did get through the month and then, in January 2009, quit drugs. By then he’d been on cocaine for 24 years—the last nine on crack. He started going to church and to a faith-based recovery program.

In 2011, Minnesota’s Star Tribune came out with a human-interest story about this remarkable crack-addict-turned-pillow-entrepreneur. The late Don Imus of New York’s WABC radio invited Lindell on his show. That October, Lindell did his first infomercial on the Discovery Channel.

“In a few short months, we went from approximately 20 employees to more than 500,” according to the book, and the company sold $100 million in pillows over the 2011-12 span.

Still, due to poor expense discipline, the company was in the red. Lindell’s private life was also tumultuous. In 2013, he remarried, but it lasted just 20 days.

The following year, he began receiving “almost audible” messages. He didn’t hear a voice per se, he writes, but he received directions that were nevertheless “clear as a bell.” One message told him he was about to meet his next girlfriend, for instance: “She is the one. Through her, you will become closer to Me.”

One such message concerned his company. Though it was then $6 million in the hole, the message said MyPillow would finish the year $8.2 million in the black.

Sure enough, on Nov. 5, 2014—the day after the midterm election—sales began spiking. From the promo code, he saw that they were coming from an ad he’d placed on Fox News. Though he’d never been political, he realized then that “Fox’s politics actually helped us,” he writes. “Republicans had retaken Congress, branding it as a reclaiming of America. Fox News watchers . . . really resonated . . . with me talking about my invention made in small-town USA.”

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
 
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The company ended the year with $8.19 million in the bank—fulfilling the premonition—and “we never looked back.”

In May 2015—a month before Trump announced his candidacy—Lindell had a dream in which he met Trump, according to a chapter in his book entitled “Awakening.” About 14 months later—around the time of the Republican convention—he was reading a magazine article about Trump when he noticed in a photo that “the wall in [Trump’s] office was the same one I’d seen in my dream.” He began praying to God to “understand what was happening,” and his phone suddenly pinged with a text message: Trump wanted to meet him at Trump Tower in New York.

“What brought tears to my eyes,” Lindell writes, “was that it seemed God had spoken directly to me in real time.”

The Trump meeting—“a divine appointment,” Lindell calls it—occurred on Aug. 15, 2016. At its close, a staffer offered to take a picture of the two men using Lindell’s phone. Just before snapping it, Trump said, “No, let’s take it over here.”

“When I checked it later,” Lindell writes, “I saw that it was the exact image I’d seen in my dream.”

‘Real-time documentation of the theft of the vote”

Let’s skip over the book’s last several miracles and turbo straight to November 2020. That month something distinctly non-miraculous happened in Lindell’s life: Americans voted his hero out of office by more than 7 million votes. (Lindell’s book was published in 2019, so there’s no chapter on that.)

On Jan. 3, 2021, an obscure conspiracy-theory website called The American Report, ran a puzzling article about a supposed international cyberattack upon the 2020 election. It included what can now be recognized as an isolated still shot from the animation that later appeared in “Absolute Proof.”

Then, on Jan. 11, The American Report ran an “exclusive” offering “raw data analytics” purporting to document that same attack. It displayed one page from the spreadsheet that later became the heart of Lindell’s “Absolute Proof.”

Both American Report articles carried the byline of Mary Fanning and Alan Jones. The previous August, these two had published a Kindle book about a purported CIA supercomputer called THE HAMMER, which the book’s sources said had been used by President Barack Obama to spy on Trump, Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr., 156 lower federal judges, more than 100 members of Congress, and scores of others.

Earlier American Report articles, also authored by Fanning and Jones, had reported that Obama had used THE HAMMER to steal the 2012 election. In late October 2020, an article by Fanning and Jones had floated the notion that THE HAMMER would also be used to steal the 2020 election from Trump. (On Nov. 7 and 8, then-CISA director Krebs warned the public that THE HAMMER story was “nonsense,” “disinfo,” “not a real thing,” and “a hoax.”)

 

According to Dominion’s later lawsuit against Lindell, The American Report website was originally registered in the name of Mary Kirchhoefer, though the registrant is now concealed by a proxy service. According to federal election records, Mary Fanning Kirchhoefer, 69, is a Trump donor who has lived in affluent suburbs north of Chicago. She also once started a business called Absoluteproof, according to Dominion’s suit.

A woman who answered a phone listing for Mary Fanning Kirchhoefer acknowledged to me that she was “Mary,” but then hung up when I identified myself as a reporter inquiring about “Absolute Proof.” She did not respond to five other messages.

On Jan. 15, Lindell quote-retweeted two screengrabs from Fanning’s Jan. 11 American Report article, including one displaying the page of the spreadsheet. Lindell’s second tweet says, “Here is one page of hundreds that prove President Trump got around 79m votes to 68m votes for Biden!”

In my interview with Lindell last week, he denied knowing what The American Report was. “I don’t watch The American Report,” he said. “I don’t know what it is.” He held to that statement even when I explained that it was Mary Fanning’s website and that it was currently advertising MyPillows. (In fact, its then-featured story was just a big MyPillow promotion.) Lindell said that didn’t mean anything because 5,000 radio stations, podcasts, and websites advertise his pillows.

Lindell told me he first learned of the spreadsheet on Jan. 9 “on the internet” somewhere, “dug into it,” and eventually spoke to “three guys” who were “former government employees and government employees” and “they had the spyware and they had all these cyber footprints” and “they took it off the machines.” He said Mary Fanning “didn’t show me nothing.”

Lindell’s movie, “Absolute Proof,” lists himself, Mary Fanning, and Brannon Howse, the president of a Christian conservative radio network, as its three co-producers. It also lists Fanning, Jones, and Howse as its three “researchers.”

In the movie, a woman identified as Mary Fanning—described there as a “national intelligence researcher and author”—narrates the 13-minute climax of “Absolute Proof.” It is she who explains what the spreadsheet and animation allegedly show. Unlike all the other people Lindell interviews in his docu-movie, Fanning is interviewed only by phone and her face is never shown, even by photograph.

“There are prismatic scoring algorithms,” Fanning says in the movie, “and they steal the vote at the transfer points—at the point where the vote is leaving the secretary of state’s office.” (Elsewhere, in The American Report, Fanning’s articles have posited that THE HAMMER steals votes at “transfer points” between the secretary of state’s office “and third-party election data vaults.”)

While Fanning is speaking in the movie, the animation is showing a global map over which moving, multicolored lines rise up from various cities in China, cross the ocean in high arching trajectories, and then descend back to earth, bombarding various locations in swing states like Georgia and Michigan.

“What you're watching, those packets moving,” Fanning says in her voiceover, “that's real-time documentation of the theft of the vote.”

Michael Lindell ,CEO of My Pillow reacts as U.S. President Donald Trump attends a Made in America roundtable meeting in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S. July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
 
Michael Lindell ,CEO of My Pillow reacts as U.S. President Donald Trump attends a Made in America roundtable meeting in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S. July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

“This is ridiculous, idiotic nonsense,” says Gregory Miller in an email. He is the co-founder of the OSET Institute (OSET stands for Open Source Elections Technology), a non-partisan, non-profit R&D organization devoted to election security.

“There are no 3d party ‘vaults,’” Miller continues. “There is no such recognized thing as a ‘transfer point.’ . ... The paper ballots of record reconcile any discrepancy, real or alleged. This silliness presumes there is no paper ballot.”

Asked what “prismatic scoring algorithms” are, Bellovin, the endowed professor of computer science at Columbia, said, “I have no idea what that means.” (Miller didn’t either.)

Beyond the fact that most of the purported addresses for vote-tabulators listed on the spreadsheet made no technological sense, Bellovin pointed out another “glaring” problem with both the spreadsheet and the animation.

“Attackers don’t use their own computers,” he said. They go through “stepping stone” computers, so that the attack finally comes from a computer in the United States—thereby avoiding, among other things, National Security Agency monitoring. “This has been a pattern of behavior of hackers going back at least 35 years,” he said. “This would be unbelievably poor tradecraft even for ordinary hackers,” he continued, let alone “a sophisticated attack by nation states.”

In our interview, Lindell seemed utterly unfazed that my experts thought his documents were crude fakes—and supremely uncurious about the accusation, too. He never asked me why any of them thought so. He was too busy hawking his next movie, to be called ‘Absolute Interference.’ “That’s going to show you a lot more, as it actually validates ‘Absolute Proof,’” he said.

(In historian Hofstadter’s famous essay of 56 years ago, he made this disarmingly apt observation: “One of the impressive things about paranoid literature is the contrast between its fantasied conclusions and the almost touching concern with factuality it invariably shows. It produces heroic strivings for evidence to prove that the unbelievable is the only thing that can be believed.”)

By the end of our interview, Lindell seemed angry. When I asked him how MyPillow’s business was, he acknowledged that 22 retailers had dropped him since he launched his stop-the-steal crusade, though he blamed that fact on someone’s having hired “bots and trolls” to “attack” those retailers.

Did that mean MyPillow’s sales were down?

“You know, that’s none of your business,” he said. “This interview’s done. You’re just gonna write some left-wing crap.” He hung up on me seconds later.

Maybe a minute after that, he texted: “Not sure what kind of journalist you are! A liar for sure! You lied to me at least 4 times and I will be reporting you to the country for the liar you are! I will pray for you... you obviously have issues! Keep watching lindelltv.com.”

 

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/dominion-v-my-pillow-guy-mike-lindell-test-for-libel-laws-090617228.html

 

GO RV, then BV

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Because I didn't see it, and some may not know, and since I can't promote other website-I'll do my best......

 

The CEO of (you rest your head on it at night) created a (singers stand on it when the sing) for FREE SPEECH.:flagsmiley:His name may or may not be in the above article.  Rhymes with Tank Teach haha. Comon' someone be braver than me!

 

Starts tonight for VIP (not DV VIP) and debuts Monday.

 

GOD BLESS AMERICA!:flagsmiley:

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8 minutes ago, fancy said:

Because I didn't see it, and some may not know, and since I can't promote other website-I'll do my best......

 

The CEO of (you rest your head on it at night) created a (singers stand on it when the sing) for FREE SPEECH.:flagsmiley:His name may or may not be in the above article.  Rhymes with Tank Teach haha. Comon' someone be braver than me!

 

Starts tonight for VIP!" rel="">VIP (not DV VIP!" rel="">VIP) and debuts Monday.

 

GOD BLESS AMERICA!:flagsmiley:

 

Here's an article on the matter.  ;)

 

POLITICS 
04/14/2021 11:16 pm ET Updated 7 hours ago

MyPillow Guy’s New ‘Free Speech’ Website Has A Glaringly Ironic Flaw Already

Mike Lindell has a very unusual definition of “free speech.”
 
 

MyPillow boss Mike Lindell is launching his own social media website this week that he says will be all about free speech. 

Except it’s not. 

Lindell’s new platform, called Frank, will not only ban certain words but also won’t allow users to insult his deity. 

 

“You’re not going to be able to swear. There will be four words for sure you can’t say. You can’t say the c-word, the n-word, the f-word and you can’t use God’s name in vain,” he said in a video interview posted online. “What a concept!”  

Lindell claimed incorrectly that this is part of the Constitution’s definition of free speech in the interview, posted on YouTube by Right Wing Watch

 

“Another thing you can’t do in there is totally defame someone,” said Lindell, who is being sued for libel for $1.3 billion by Dominion Voting Systems. 

 

Lindell is among a number of far-right figures who were banned from Twitter this year for violating the platform’s civic integrity policy ― specifically by repeating lies about last year’s election, including promoting conspiracy theories about Dominion. 

He was also photographed at the White House in January with documents urging then-President Donald Trump to declare martial law and engage the U.S. military to block the results of the November presidential election. 

Lindell’s website is supposed to launch on Friday. 

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mike-lindell-free-speech-website_n_60779d5ee4b08e452a172f0b

 

GO RV, then BV

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Thanks for saying it lol.  To me it's would be nice to not have to read all that profanity and I hate it when people say God's (the article reads "his deity"-shameful!)  name in vain.  Shabs would you be surprised if Mike's "lies" turned out not to be lies? At least it's a place for like minds to gather. 

 

Frank Speech

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1 minute ago, fancy said:

Thanks for saying it lol.  To me it's would be nice to not have to read all that profanity and I hate it when people say God's (the article reads "his deity"-shameful!)  name in vain.  Shabs would you be surprised if Mike's "lies" turned out not to be lies? At least it's a place for like minds to gather. 

 

Frank Speech

 

I would absolutely be surprised if Mike's lies turned out to be true.

 

GO RV, then BV

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2 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

I would absolutely be surprised if Mike's lies turned out to be true.

 

GO RV, then BV

 

And here you are putting all your faith and trust in the secular media and a socialist party that couldn't care less where they are heading, all because Orange Man is bad.  Go figure. :facepalm:

 

 

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15 hours ago, Markinsa said:

 

And here you are putting all your faith and trust in the secular media and a socialist party that couldn't care less where they are heading, all because Orange Man is bad.  Go figure. :facepalm:

 

 

Fuel up my car and have it maintained at secular gas stations and mechanic shops, respectively.....buy groceries at a secular market....order products online from secular outlets....use my vet status for secular V.A. services.....etc. etc...all of which seems to work out just fine.  I think I remember you told me months ago that Fox is out and Newsmax is the place to be.  Yet, that same Newsmax shut Mike Lindell down for pushing the "Big Lie".  I suppose that makes that network secular, which most people probably already knew. 

 

https://nypost.com/2021/02/03/newsmax-anchor-leaves-interview-with-my-pillows-mike-lindell/

 

And just because a party isn't conservative, doesn't make it socialist.  <_< 

 

GO RV, then BV

Edited by Shabibilicious
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20 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

And just because a party isn't conservative, doesn't make it socialist.

 

Romans 1:21-32 (NASB)


21 For even though they knew God, they did not honor Him as God or give thanks, but they became futile in their reasonings, and their senseless hearts were darkened. 22 Claiming to be wise, they became fools, 23 and they exchanged the glory of the incorruptible God for an image in the form of corruptible mankind, of birds, four-footed animals, and crawling creatures.

 

24 Therefore God gave them up to vile impurity in the lusts of their hearts, so that their bodies would be dishonored among them. 25 For they exchanged the truth of God for falsehood, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.

 

26 For this reason God gave them over to degrading passions; for their women exchanged natural relations for that which is contrary to nature, 27 and likewise the men, too, abandoned natural relations with women and burned in their desire toward one another, males with males committing shameful acts and receiving in their own persons the due penalty of their error.

 

28 And just as they did not see fit to acknowledge God, God gave them up to a depraved mind, to do those things that are not proper, 29 people having been filled with all unrighteousness, wickedness, greed, and evil; full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, and malice; they are gossips, 30 slanderers, haters of God, insolent, arrogant, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, 31 without understanding, untrustworthy, unfeeling, and unmerciful; 32 and although they know the ordinance of God, that those who practice such things are worthy of death, they not only do the same, but also approve of those who practice them.

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3 minutes ago, Markinsa said:

 

Romans 1:21-32 (NASB)


21 For even though they knew God, they did not honor Him as God or give thanks, but they became futile in their reasonings, and their senseless hearts were darkened. 22 Claiming to be wise, they became fools, 23 and they exchanged the glory of the incorruptible God for an image in the form of corruptible mankind, of birds, four-footed animals, and crawling creatures.

 

24 Therefore God gave them up to vile impurity in the lusts of their hearts, so that their bodies would be dishonored among them. 25 For they exchanged the truth of God for falsehood, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.

 

26 For this reason God gave them over to degrading passions; for their women exchanged natural relations for that which is contrary to nature, 27 and likewise the men, too, abandoned natural relations with women and burned in their desire toward one another, males with males committing shameful acts and receiving in their own persons the due penalty of their error.

 

28 And just as they did not see fit to acknowledge God, God gave them up to a depraved mind, to do those things that are not proper, 29 people having been filled with all unrighteousness, wickedness, greed, and evil; full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, and malice; they are gossips, 30 slanderers, haters of God, insolent, arrogant, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, 31 without understanding, untrustworthy, unfeeling, and unmerciful; 32 and although they know the ordinance of God, that those who practice such things are worthy of death, they not only do the same, but also approve of those who practice them.

 

You actually believe politics and religion are one and the same?  What makes you think Orange man has changed his immoral ways?  Has he ever sought forgiveness?  Are we to love one another as children of God, or is love of money more important?

 

GO RV, then BV

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1 hour ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

  What makes you think Orange man has changed his immoral ways?  Has he ever sought forgiveness?  

 

Judge not lest ye be judged

 

Who are you to ask?

It is not your place to know.

God knows DJT's heart and he will be judged or welcomed into the Kingdom on his final day.

Your job is to forgive, not worry about Gods business. 

 

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12 minutes ago, nstoolman1 said:

Judge not lest ye be judged

 

Who are you to ask?

It is not your place to know.

God knows DJT's heart and he will be judged or welcomed into the Kingdom on his final day.

Your job is to forgive, not worry about Gods business. 

 

 

Sounds good, I'll forgive DJT and you forgive Joe for whatever you believe he did wrong.....ready, go.

 

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9 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

Sounds good, I'll forgive DJT and you forgive Joe for whatever you believe he did wrong.....ready, go.

 

GO RV, then BV

Works for me. 

I can forgive Joe the person.

I do not have to forgive Joe the politician.

He needs to be held accountable for his actions.

He needs to stand before the people for his decisions he has made.

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13 minutes ago, nstoolman1 said:

Works for me. 

I can forgive Joe the person.

I do not have to forgive Joe the politician.

He needs to be held accountable for his actions.

He needs to stand before the people for his decisions he has made.

 

And here we find ourselves....right back where we started.  

 

GO RV, then BV

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1 hour ago, Shabibilicious said:

You actually believe politics and religion are one and the same?

 

 

John Adams

 

[W]e have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. . . . Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the
government of any other.

 

(Source: John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States, Charles Francis Adams, editor (Boston: Little, Brown, and Co. 1854), Vol. IX, p. 229, October 11, 1798.)

 

------

 

Oliver Ellsworth

 

Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court

 

[T]he primary objects of government are the peace, order, and prosperity of society. . . . To the promotion of these objects, particularly in a republican government, good morals are essential. Institutions for the promotion of good morals are therefore objects of legislative provision and support: and among these . . . religious institutions are eminently useful and important. . . . [T]he legislature, charged with the great interests of the community, may, and ought to countenance, aid and protect religious institutions—institutions wisely calculated to direct men to the performance of all the duties arising from their connection with each other, and to prevent or repress those evils which flow from unrestrained passion.

 

(Source: Connecticut Courant, June 7, 1802, p. 3, Oliver Ellsworth, to the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut)

 

------

 

Benjamin Franklin

 

I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid?

 

We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that “except the Lord build the House, they labor in vain that build it.”

 

I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without His concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better, than the Builders of Babel: We shall be divided by our partial local interests; our projects will be confounded, and we ourselves shall become a reproach and bye word down to future ages. And what is worse, mankind may hereafter from this unfortunate instance, despair of establishing governments by human wisdom and leave it to chance, war and conquest.

 

I therefore beg leave to move that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessings on
our deliberations be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business, and that one or more of the clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.

 

(Source: James Madison, The Records of the
Federal Convention of 1787, Max Farrand, editor (New Haven: Yale University
Press, 1911), Vol. I, pp. 450-452, June 28, 1787.)

 

2 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

What makes you think Orange man has changed his immoral ways?  Has he ever sought forgiveness?

 

I've seen a video of President Trump at a Church asking for prayer.  Perhaps in his previous life he wasn't saved, but we have all been or are still in that place before we've accepted Christ.  Perhaps you do not accept that, fortunately for President Trump he doesn't have to rely on you to forgive him.  

 

.

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19 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

And here we find ourselves....right back where we started.  

 

GO RV, then BV

 

Not how I see it.

Joe the person... Gods business.

Joe the politician...The Peoples business.

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2 minutes ago, nstoolman1 said:

 

Not how I see it.

Joe the person... Gods business.

Joe the politician...The Peoples business.

 

This is an interesting conversation....as Markinsa believes and has provided quotes that politics and religion are indelibly intertwined.....and your take is the complete opposite.  This is why it's an amazing experience to be a free thinking American.

 

And on a side note, with reference to this thread.....Hunter Biden and Mike Lindell are indelibly intertwined as former drug addicts, one further along in his journey than the other, but oh so similar....except for forgiveness.  Forgiveness seems to be linked to party affiliation.  As always, just my opinion.

 

GO RV, then BV

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On 4/15/2021 at 1:26 PM, fancy said:

Because I didn't see it, and some may not know, and since I can't promote other website-I'll do my best......

 

The CEO of (you rest your head on it at night) created a (singers stand on it when the sing) for FREE SPEECH.:flagsmiley:His name may or may not be in the above article.  Rhymes with Tank Teach haha. Comon' someone be braver than me!

 

Starts tonight for VIP!" rel="">VIP (not DV VIP!" rel="">VIP) and debuts Monday.

 

GOD BLESS AMERICA!:flagsmiley:

 

Another article I found today I thought you might want to read, fancy, concerning the lack of access for VIP that was supposed to happen last night.   :peace:

 

 

 

The Independent

MyPillow guy’s social network launch falls flat

Gustaf Kilander
Fri, April 16, 2021, 2:02 PM·3 min read
 
 
My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell laughs during a &#xd2;
 
My Pillow CEO Michael Lindell laughs during a Ò

The new social media network promoted by MyPillow CEO and Trump supporter Mike Lindell failed to come online on Friday, as was planned.

Mr Lindell posted a video on a placeholder website, in which he announced that people who wanted early access to the site could send in their phone numbers to get VIP status on the new platform, which would start operations "Thursday night at midnight.”

Thursday night came and went, and eventually, confused fans took to Telegram to express their frustration. On Mr Lindell's verified channel on Telegram, one user wrote: "I expected a VIP launch midnight Thursday but nothing. What's up?"

 

Another account holder added: "It seems the site did not go live the way it was supposed to. Not sure what the issue is but it is a huge letdown that's for sure. After all the hype."

Disappointed, another user wrote on Friday morning: "No communication, no text....no one knows what is going on. Doesn't feel good."

The reason for the lack of pre-launch of the website, called FrankSpeech, still isn't clear.

In the video on the placeholder site, Mr Lindell claimed it would be like a combination of YouTube and Twitter. He added that work on the website had been going on for four years.

"Over the last four weeks, I've spent millions of dollars," Mr Lindell said, adding that the money was spent to make the platform secure and to make sure it can handle an influx of users.

"We're going to be attacked, but I have my own servers," he said, adding: "We're not going to be worried about Amazon taking it down, or YouTube, or Google, or Apple."

The launch of the full-sized network will take place on Monday 19 April, at 9am, Mr Lindell claimed in the video. He said the launch would be a two-day "Frankathon".

"I'm going to be live on there all day long," he said.

Promoted as a free speech site, there will still be limits on what you will be able to do on the network.

Mr Lindell told Eric Metaxas’ radio programme on Monday: "You're not going to be able to swear.

There will be four words for sure you can't say: You can't say the C-word, the N-word, the F-word, and you can't use God's name in vain. What a concept. Right?"

Some Telegram users said they received error codes after signing up with their phone numbers on the placeholder site.

A user named Lisa Perez said: "Well, it did not launch at midnight for us VIP like it was supposed to. Or did I miss something. Midnight their time is 2 a.m. here, I waited for it and nothing."

An account holder going by Frank Combs said: "I just thought of something everybody, instead of midnight tonight, maybe Mike meant noon?"

A notice on the site states: "To protect against SPAM, we send a limited amount of valid confirmation codes to a single phone number. If you've tried more than this amount, you may have been blocked - please try again later."

Mr Lindell was banned from Twitter in January for spreading lies about the 2020 election.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/mypillow-guy-social-network-launch-180234501.html

 

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1 hour ago, Shabibilicious said:

that was supposed to happen last night.

 

I believe the target date was set for April 20th, with special early access for this Sunday and Monday. :twocents:

 

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Business Insider

Mike Lindell says his company MyPillow is suing Dominion for $1.6 billion

Grace Dean
Mon, April 19, 2021, 10:53 AM
 
mike lindell trump
 
Mike Lindell with then-President Donald Trump at the White House in March 2020. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images
  • Mike Lindell said his company MyPillow is suing Dominion for $1.6 billion.

  • Dominion had filed an earlier $1.3 billion lawsuit against Lindell over his voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

MyPillow is suing Dominion Voting Systems for $1.6 billion, its CEO Mike Lindell said Monday.

The suit appears to be a counterattack after Dominion filed a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against both the company and Lindell in February.

MyPillow has now sued Dominion for $1.6 billion, Lindell announced in a livestream on his social-media site Frank on Monday.

 

"This is all about the first amendment rights and free speech," Lindell said.

Frank Mike Lindell
 
Mike Lindell during a livestreamed launch of his social-media site, Frank, on April 19, 2021. Frank

The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that the suit makes a distinction between MyPillow and Lindell, arguing that the CEO was speaking on his own behalf when alleging election fraud.

Insider was not immediately able to locate documents to verify details of the suit.

Lindell, a major GOP donor, is a staunch ally of former president Donald Trump and has repeatedly supported his claims challenging the integrity of the 2020 presidential election.

Lindell spread the conspiracy theory claiming that Dominion Voting Systems developed technology to switch votes from Trump to President Joe Biden. The theory has been thoroughly debunked.

Per the Journal, MyPillow in the lawsuit said "in making these statements, Lindell spoke for himself, not MyPillow," the suit says. "MyPillow has not engaged in discussion about the 2020 election."

Alan Dershowitz, Lindell's lawyer for the case, discussed the lawsuit alongside Lindell during the livestream on Monday.

"I've been defending the first amendment for 60 years, and I'm not going to stop now," Dershowitz said.

Dominion Legal Counsel Stephen Shackelford, a partner at Susman Godfrey LLP, told Insider: "This is a meritless retaliatory lawsuit, filed by MyPillow to try to distract from the harm it caused to Dominion."

Dominion sued Lindell, Powell, Giuliani, and Fox News

On February 22, Dominion filed a defamation suit against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell after filing similar ones against pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell, Trump's former personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, and Fox News.

Dominion's lawsuit accused Lindell of repeatedly making false allegations while knowing there was no credible evidence to support his claims.

As well as rallies, interviews, and a two-hour movie, Lindell used his social-media profiles to spread his baseless claims of voter fraud, and that Dominion built its machines "to cheat."

Lindell previously told Insider that Dominion had "zero, zero, zero" chance of winning. The lawsuits were part of cancel culture's attempts at silencing voices, he said.

"I looked at it as a great day for America when they sued me," Lindell added. "I can put the evidence for the whole world to see, and it'll be public record, and the media will quit trying to suppress it."

More than 20 retailers have severed ties with MyPillow

In its lawsuit, Dominion claimed Lindell used the claims as a way to ramp up his pillow sales, advertising on far-right media outlets that parroted his claims and sponsoring a bus tour that sought to overturn the election results.

But Lindell's lawsuit said that Dominion has caused "grave harm" to MyPillow "as a result of Dominion's suppression of speech and attacks on the Company, per The Wall Street Journal.

Retailers have scrambled to cut ties with the brand following the insurrection and Lindell's insistence that the election result was fraudulent.

More than 20 retailers, including Bed Bath and Beyond, Sam's Club, Kohl's, and most recently Costco, have stopped selling MyPillow's products.

Some of the companies cited poor sales, but Lindell blamed it on "cancel culture" and said that people saying they would boycott the brand were "bots and trolls."

Lindell told Insider that lost retailer revenue would cost the company around $65 million this year.

But Lindell said during his livestream Monday that this wasn't the main reason for his lawsuit.

"It's not about the money, it's about our first amendment rights," he said.

Twitter also banned Mike Lindell for sharing voter-fraud conspiracy theories on the site. It then suspended MyPillow's account, too, after Lindell used it to evade his personal ban and accused Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey of being "tied into the election fraud."

Lindell said in mid-March that he hadn't been back to his home in Minnesota for two months, instead moving between "undisclosed locations," and no longer attends in-person events because he fears for his safety.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/mike-lindell-says-company-mypillow-145353035.html

 

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Business Insider

I watched eight hours of Mike Lindell's 48-hour Frank-A-Thon. Here are the highlights.

 
 
Cheryl Teh
Tue, April 20, 2021, 5:43 AM
 
 
Frank Mike Lindell
 
Lindell is celebrating the launch of his new social-media platform, Frank, by launching a 48-hour livestream that he is calling the Frank-A-Thon. Frank
  • Mike Lindell went on a 48-hour livestreaming marathon to celebrate the launch of his new social media platform, "Frank."

  • I watched eight hours of Lindell's streaming bender, Frank-A-Thon, which kicked off at 9 a.m. CT.

  • Lindell was still going strong on the livestream some 18 hours later.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has launched his social media platform, Frank, after being banned from Twitter in January for spreading conspiracy theories about voter fraud.

To celebrate, he launched a 48-hour livestream that he's calling the Frank-A-Thon.

Lindell is a staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump and has parroted Trump's voter fraud claims. He doubled down on his false theory about the 2020 election in a new lawsuit against Dominion Voting Systems filed Monday.

Frank was initially slated for a VIP launch last Thursday, but a notice posted on the Frank website's static page said it was delayed to 8 a.m. CT on Monday.

 

Technical issues prevented users from signing up and creating accounts. Lindell attributed these server errors to a "massive attack," posting on Parler that the site would be up soon. New users were still not able to log on or create accounts at the time of this article's publishing.

The livestream began at 9 a.m. CT. I tuned in on the dot, and watched eights hours of it on and off throughout the day. Here are some of the highlights.

Lindell gets punk'd by a prank caller posing as Trump

Some five hours into the livestream, a call came in, claiming to have "Mr. Trump on standby."

"We have the real president here, our real president," Lindell said. "Hello, Mr. President!"

 

The caller launched into a string of expletives as Lindell struggled to end the call. Twitter user James Winder, who runs a comedy podcast, later took credit for the prank call.

 

Lindell announces the screening of a new documentary, "Absolute Interference"

Around 12 hours into the stream, Lindell announced that he would be launching his two-hour documentary, "Absolute Interference," during the second day of the Frank-A-Thon.

Lindell said that people, regardless of their political affiliation, would be shocked at the contents of this documentary.

"This is going to change our world forever, everybody. This is proof and evidence that China was attacking our country, and you're gonna know that this election was flipped," Lindell said. "This is bad."

Lindell's claims that a Chinese cyberattack "flipped" the 2020 elections and that Dominion voting machines broke at midnight on election night have been debunked. Dominion filed a $1.3 billion defamation suit against Lindell in February for perpetuating voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

 

Mike Lindell rages against Jimmy Kimmel

At around 1.30 a.m. on Tuesday, Lindell started ranting about late-night TV show host Jimmy Kimmel.

Lindell rebuked Kimmel for poking fun at him, his new social media platform, and his newly launched e-commerce platform MyStore on "Jimmy Kimmel Live" last Tuesday.

"You're a former crack addict who somehow made millions of dollars selling pillows. Sell pillows. Why isn't that enough?" Kimmel said during his show's monologue last week.

"He said I was on drugs and crack cocaine and all that stuff," Lindell said on his livestream. He then accused Kimmel of being an addict himself. "He said I'm lucky I have all my teeth. Maybe you're an addict too, Jimmy," he said.

There is no evidence that Kimmel is an addict or recovering addict. Lindell has not been shy about his past addiction to crack cocaine. In response to Lindell's segment on Frank-A-Thon, Kimmel aired snippets of Lindell's rant during his Monday night monologue.

'Bad people' and 'threats'

At one point in the livestream, Lindell started telling his viewers that he was facing "threats" to his life, with "bad people coming for him."

"All these bad people, they got my phone number, we don't have free speech," Lindell said. "They hacked my phone, because they couldn't break Frank, they couldn't break me!" It is unclear what Lindell was referring to by these "threats."

From there, he segued into talking about how supermarket chain Costco "canceled" him.

"They loved MyPillow but jumped on the bandwagon of cancel culture," Lindell said. "Shame on you, Costco!"

He mentioned receiving death threats again halfway through his Costco tirade. It is unclear if Lindell meant to imply that he was receiving death threats from Costco.

The show goes on

Lindell said on several occasions during the stream that he would advocate for "freedom of speech" by hosting livestreams "every day or every week."

"I'll sleep for a couple hours later," Lindell said at 3 a.m. "And it'll be quality sleep, on my MyPillow!"

He is expected to carry on livestreaming for at least another 24 hours, with a continuous slate of guests calling in to speak to him.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/news/watched-eight-hours-mike-lindells-094357758.html

 

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11 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:
Business Insider

I watched eight hours of Mike Lindell's 48-hour Frank-A-Thon. Here are the highlights.

 
 
Cheryl Teh
Tue, April 20, 2021, 5:43 AM
 
 
Frank Mike Lindell
 
Lindell is celebrating the launch of his new social-media platform, Frank, by launching a 48-hour livestream that he is calling the Frank-A-Thon. Frank
  • Mike Lindell went on a 48-hour livestreaming marathon to celebrate the launch of his new social media platform, "Frank."

  • I watched eight hours of Lindell's streaming bender, Frank-A-Thon, which kicked off at 9 a.m. CT.

  • Lindell was still going strong on the livestream some 18 hours later.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has launched his social media platform, Frank, after being banned from Twitter in January for spreading conspiracy theories about voter fraud.

To celebrate, he launched a 48-hour livestream that he's calling the Frank-A-Thon.

Lindell is a staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump and has parroted Trump's voter fraud claims. He doubled down on his false theory about the 2020 election in a new lawsuit against Dominion Voting Systems filed Monday.

Frank was initially slated for a VIP!" rel="">VIP launch last Thursday, but a notice posted on the Frank website's static page said it was delayed to 8 a.m. CT on Monday.

 

Technical issues prevented users from signing up and creating accounts. Lindell attributed these server errors to a "massive attack," posting on Parler that the site would be up soon. New users were still not able to log on or create accounts at the time of this article's publishing.

The livestream began at 9 a.m. CT. I tuned in on the dot, and watched eights hours of it on and off throughout the day. Here are some of the highlights.

Lindell gets punk'd by a prank caller posing as Trump

Some five hours into the livestream, a call came in, claiming to have "Mr. Trump on standby."

"We have the real president here, our real president," Lindell said. "Hello, Mr. President!"

 

The caller launched into a string of expletives as Lindell struggled to end the call. Twitter user James Winder, who runs a comedy podcast, later took credit for the prank call.

 

Lindell announces the screening of a new documentary, "Absolute Interference"

Around 12 hours into the stream, Lindell announced that he would be launching his two-hour documentary, "Absolute Interference," during the second day of the Frank-A-Thon.

Lindell said that people, regardless of their political affiliation, would be shocked at the contents of this documentary.

"This is going to change our world forever, everybody. This is proof and evidence that China was attacking our country, and you're gonna know that this election was flipped," Lindell said. "This is bad."

Lindell's claims that a Chinese cyberattack "flipped" the 2020 elections and that Dominion voting machines broke at midnight on election night have been debunked. Dominion filed a $1.3 billion defamation suit against Lindell in February for perpetuating voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

 

Mike Lindell rages against Jimmy Kimmel

At around 1.30 a.m. on Tuesday, Lindell started ranting about late-night TV show host Jimmy Kimmel.

Lindell rebuked Kimmel for poking fun at him, his new social media platform, and his newly launched e-commerce platform MyStore on "Jimmy Kimmel Live" last Tuesday.

"You're a former crack addict who somehow made millions of dollars selling pillows. Sell pillows. Why isn't that enough?" Kimmel said during his show's monologue last week.

"He said I was on drugs and crack cocaine and all that stuff," Lindell said on his livestream. He then accused Kimmel of being an addict himself. "He said I'm lucky I have all my teeth. Maybe you're an addict too, Jimmy," he said.

There is no evidence that Kimmel is an addict or recovering addict. Lindell has not been shy about his past addiction to crack cocaine. In response to Lindell's segment on Frank-A-Thon, Kimmel aired snippets of Lindell's rant during his Monday night monologue.

'Bad people' and 'threats'

At one point in the livestream, Lindell started telling his viewers that he was facing "threats" to his life, with "bad people coming for him."

"All these bad people, they got my phone number, we don't have free speech," Lindell said. "They hacked my phone, because they couldn't break Frank, they couldn't break me!" It is unclear what Lindell was referring to by these "threats."

From there, he segued into talking about how supermarket chain Costco "canceled" him.

"They loved MyPillow but jumped on the bandwagon of cancel culture," Lindell said. "Shame on you, Costco!"

He mentioned receiving death threats again halfway through his Costco tirade. It is unclear if Lindell meant to imply that he was receiving death threats from Costco.

The show goes on

Lindell said on several occasions during the stream that he would advocate for "freedom of speech" by hosting livestreams "every day or every week."

"I'll sleep for a couple hours later," Lindell said at 3 a.m. "And it'll be quality sleep, on my MyPillow!"

He is expected to carry on livestreaming for at least another 24 hours, with a continuous slate of guests calling in to speak to him.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/news/watched-eight-hours-mike-lindells-094357758.html

 

GO RV, then BV

I've been watching for two days, I knew cheating was anticipated and the right people knew it, and Mike Lindell has the proof! And yes scientific proof. Alot of people are gonna be shocked to say the least.... this is crazy! This is new proof, the courts haven't seen this yet. How unthinkable the scale of players, local county to China and other countries too. You should watch some of it Shabs, you may be very suprised. As an American I'm pretty mad!

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