Guest views are now limited to 12 pages. If you get an "Error" message, just sign in! If you need to create an account, click here.

Jump to content
  • CRYPTO REWARDS!

    Full endorsement on this opportunity - but it's limited, so get in while you can!

Biden's First 50 Days: Where He Stands On Key Promises


Recommended Posts

 
 
 
Associated Press

Biden's first 50 days: Where he stands on key promises

ALEXANDRA JAFFE
Wed, March 10, 2021, 12:10 AM
 
 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out an ambitious agenda for his first 100 days in office, promising swift action on everything from climate change to immigration reform to the coronavirus pandemic.

He hits his 50th day in office on Wednesday as his administration eyes a major milestone: final congressional passage of his massive $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid package. The bill includes direct payments to millions of Americans and money to help the White House deliver on a number of Biden's biggest campaign promises, like reopening schools and getting more Americans vaccinated.

Fifty days in, Biden has made major strides on a number of key campaign pledges for his earliest days in office, while others are still awaiting action. Where he stands on some of his major promises:

COMPLETED GOALS

Biden prioritized addressing the coronavirus pandemic during his first weeks in office, and the focus has paid off. He’s on pace to hit his goal of 100 million vaccine doses administered in his first 100 days as soon as the end of next week. The daily rate of vaccinations now averages more than 2 million shots, and more than 75 million doses have been administered since Biden was sworn in.

Biden also took took several early actions that fulfilled pledges on climate policy. He signed an executive order on Inauguration Day that revoked the permit for the Keystone XL oil pipeline, halted development of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and ordered the review of Trump-era rules on the environment, public health and science. A Jan. 27 executive order halted new oil and gas leases on federal lands and offshore waters.

Biden also easily delivered on top campaign pledges that involved rolling back Trump administration moves on everything from climate change to immigration. Early on, the Biden administration rejoined the World Health Organization and the Paris Climate Accord, halted construction of the border wall, ended travel restrictions on people from a variety of Muslim-majority countries and created a task force to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

On immigration, Biden pledged to deliver a comprehensive reform bill to Congress within his first 100 days, and it was unveiled last month, although Biden already has signaled an openness to a piece-by-piece approach if necessary. Biden also issued an executive order directing the Homeland Security secretary to “preserve and fortify” protections for young immigrants brought to the U.S. by their parents.

Biden also made some early moves to deliver on a pledge to tighten ethical standards in his administration, including a Jan. 20 executive order imposing an ethics pledge on appointees governing activities such as lobbying and taking gifts, which included prohibiting political interference in the Justice Department.

IN PROGRESS

Still other Biden promises remain a work in progress.

Biden’s national COVID-19 strategy pledged to establish 100 new, federally supported vaccination centers across the nation by the end of February. So far, the administration is at about 20 mass vaccination sites run end-to-end by the federal government and staffed by active-duty troops deployed by the Pentagon. Overall, the administration says, at least 441 vaccination sites are now federally supported. Many of those were not new sites, but nearly all have expanded capacity with the additional federal resources.

On immigration, Biden pledged to reverse the “public charge” rule put in place by the Trump administration to discourage immigrants from using public benefits, to streamline the naturalization process and to reform the U.S. asylum system within his first 100 days. An executive order he signed in early February directs the relevant agencies to review those policies and recommend changes within 60 days.

The administration has made some moves to reform the asylum system, including a move by the Department of Homeland Security on Biden’s first day in office to suspend a Trump-era program requiring asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their claims were under review. But Biden has yet to articulate a plan to manage asylum flows beyond proposing that billions of dollars be spent to address root causes in Central America.

The president has also kept in place pandemic-related powers that allow his administration to immediately expel people at the border without an opportunity to seek asylum. Biden aides have said they have no immediate plans to end the authority, which Trump introduced a year ago using an obscure 1944 public health law.

Biden also promised to end the long-term detention of migrant families. Immigration and Customs Enforcement signaled last week it plans to discontinue the use of one such facility, but ICE will continue to hold families for three days or less at two other facilities in Texas. And the Biden administration is expanding capacity at a number of long-term facilities that hold immigrant children, to address an ongoing surge of unaccompanied minors at the border.

On climate change, Biden pledged to establish enforceable commitments from other nations to reduce emissions in global shipping and aviation and to convene a climate world summit to discuss new and more ambitious pledges to address climate change, within his first 100 days. The U.S. will hold such a summit on April 22, Earth Day.

Reopening America’s schools is one of Biden’s major campaign promises that’s proven tougher to execute, in part because the decision on whether to return to in-person learning is left up to local officials and teachers’ unions. After some back-and-forth over the details of his goal, Biden said last month that his 100-day mission was to have most elementary schools open five days a week for in-person learning.

This month he directed states to prioritize vaccinating teachers and announced he was directing federal resources toward vaccinating teachers in March. The Biden administration hopes that with the passage of the coronavirus relief bill and distribution of millions in aid for schools to improve safety measures, teachers will feel more comfortable returning to in-person learning.

According to Burbio, which tracks school reopening plans, about 47% of kindergarten through 12th grade students have access to in-person school every weekday.

AWAITING ACTION

The Biden administration has yet to take significant action on criminal justice reform, aside from an executive order terminating private prison contracts. Biden pledged to set up a police oversight board within his first 100 days, but there's been no clear movement in that direction so far.

Other 100-day pledges also awaiting movement: creating a Cabinet-level working group focused on promoting union participation, and ordering an FBI review of issues with gun purchase background checks.

Some of Biden’s 100-day pledges will require congressional action, like his promise to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and increase taxes on corporations. Biden also promised to make passage of the Equality Act, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity, a priority in his first 100 days. That bill has passed the House but not the Senate.

And some of his promises are waiting on Biden’s Cabinet secretaries to be confirmed by the Senate. On gun control, Biden has said he would direct his attorney general to deliver recommendations to restructure key Justice Department agencies to more effectively enforce the nation’s gun laws. He also pledged to have his secretary of Housing and Urban Development lead a task force to create recommendations for making housing a right for all Americans.

Both his attorney general nominee, Merrick Garland, and his nominee to lead the Housing Department, Rep. Marcia Fudge, are expected to win confirmation this week.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/bidens-first-50-days-where-051008497.html

 

Hopefully this thread doesn't prove to be cringeworthy....fingers crossed.  B)

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
  • Sad 1
  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 76
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Biden's first 50 days: Where he stands on key promises ALEXANDRA JAFFE Wed, March 10, 2021, 12:10 AM     WASHIN

Biden’s Open Borders Policy is a complete disaster.  The Drug Cartels are having a field day.  25% of tested immigrants have Covid.  The Border Patrol has not been vaccinated.     One good t

Cringeworthy?....probably not!   Firstly I guess your premise is that Joe keeping campaign promises is a good thing?   A guy who didn't campaign....hasn't had a press conference...

Posted Images

Cringeworthy?....probably not!

 

Firstly I guess your premise is that Joe keeping campaign promises is a good thing?

 

A guy who didn't campaign....hasn't had a press conference....can't hold an intelligent conversation after 10 minutes.....  very likely never wrote any promises.....

 

Whoever his handlers are......whoever is in control wrote his first 100 day goals/promises.....

 

As to those goals/promises...

 

The border......fail for the US

The pipeline .....fail

Paris Accords.....fail

 

Covid......just piggy backing off of Trumps plan......claiming as his own...

 

I'll wait to see what others add......but for now....

 

Just the facts......tell me I'm wrong?

CL

 

 

 

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 2
  • Pow! 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Biden’s Open Borders Policy is a complete disaster.  The Drug Cartels are having a field day.  25% of tested immigrants have Covid.  The Border Patrol has not been vaccinated.  

 

One good thing for Texans is that they are shipping thousands of these people to the Midwest. Maybe even to your small town Shabbs.  When your town is overrun and your culture is ruined then maybe you will have an small idea what we have had to endure under Obama and now Biden.  

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 2
  • Pow! 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, coorslite21 said:

The pipeline .....fail

 

Thousands of workers have lost their good paying jobs.

 

Our  Country is no longer Energy independent.  

 

Gasoline prices are up in Texas .70-.85!!!  That’s a hidden Tax on the American people. Everything is going up because of the higher energy bills.  Thanks for the Inflationary policies Democrats.  That’s the way to help the middle class.  

 

Covid 19 Bill is 9-10% tops for Covid relief.  Read the damn bill. I did, and it is a raid of the US Treasury.  A complete travesty.  Our children and grandkids will be paying the price of this Covid Bill for many years.  

 

If you haven’t read the Time magazine article on how the Dems bragged about using the Covid 19 to get rid of Trump you should, if you can find it.  I’m sure it’s been censored by now.  

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1
  • Pow! 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Pitcher said:

Biden’s Open Borders Policy is a complete disaster.  The Drug Cartels are having a field day.  25% of tested immigrants have Covid.  The Border Patrol has not been vaccinated.  

 

One good thing for Texans is that they are shipping thousands of these people to the Midwest. Maybe even to your small town Shabbs.  When your town is overrun and your culture is ruined then maybe you will have an small idea what we have had to endure under Obama and now Biden.  

 

They come up here every summer and work the tomato fields....have for years.

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Pitcher said:

Covid 19 Bill is 9-10% tops for Covid relief.  Read the damn bill. I did, and it is a raid of the US Treasury.  A complete travesty.  Our children and grandkids will be paying the price of this Covid Bill for many years.  

I have! 560 billion to individuals. 377 billion for small businesses. 153 billion for health care directly for covid related infrastructure. Just that right there is 50%

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 3
  • Pow! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

They come up here every summer and work the tomato fields....have for years.

 

GO RV, then BV

Your not seriously suggesting that all those hundreds of thousands of ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS go back to Mexico when the picking is done :facepalm1:

 

10 hours ago, coorslite21 said:

Just the facts......tell me I'm wrong?

CL

Okay, "You're Wrong". :lmao:

Not really, I just wanted to be the first to say it. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

They come up here every summer and work the tomato fields....have for years.

 

GO RV, then BV

 

That's easy to say.....are they legal or illegal.....?

There are a great number of legal migrants that travel with the ripening of the crops....farms provide approved housing for them and the pay provided meets federal and state guidelines...

 

Those non citizens, with lesser, or no rights, more times than not are taken advantage of......just how life works....     CL

  • Pow! 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

Your not seriously suggesting that all those hundreds of thousands of ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS go back to Mexico when the picking is done :facepalm1:

 

Nope, not suggesting that at all.....different regions of the country have different growing and harvest seasons for different crops and produce.

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

Nope, not suggesting that at all.....different regions of the country have different growing and harvest seasons for different crops and produce.

 

GO RV, then BV

I don't get it. You scream bloody murder for years over your suspected illegal actions of Trump but you are willing to overlook the obvious crime of ILLEGALLY crossing our boarders. To say nothing of the crimes of election fraud. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

Nope, not suggesting that at all.....different regions of the country have different growing and harvest seasons for different crops and produce.

 

GO RV, then BV

Hey Shabbs, a question for ya.... Do you think the 11 Iranian men caught  crossing illegally were coming to work the fields ??

  • Upvote 1
  • Pow! 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

To say nothing of the crimes of election fraud. 

 

Election fraud on a massive scale that could alter the outcome of a NATIONAL election has proven to be a false claim, a "Big Lie"....and has gone nowhere in the court system of this country, even with a hand-picked, conservative top-heavy SCOTUS.  

 

GO RV, then BV 

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Shelley said:

Hey Shabbs, a question for ya.... Do you think the 11 Iranian men caught  crossing illegally were coming to work the fields ??

 

Probably not, yet they were caught....so what's the question again?

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Shabibilicious said:

Election fraud on a massive scale that could alter the outcome of a NATIONAL election has proven to be a false claim, a "Big Lie"....and has gone nowhere in the court system of this country, even with a hand-picked, conservative top-heavy SCOTUS.  

 

The lie is President Biden

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 3
  • Pow! 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

You can go right down his list.....his EO's and the rest....Biden's, or his handlers, motivations are very clear.....here is just a minor one......with a few comments at the end.....

 

 
Trucking Info
 
 
 

FLEET MANAGEMENT

 

Biden Reverses Trump Move to Industry-Led Apprenticeships

February 18, 2021  by Deborah Lockridge

 
Biden plans to expand registered apprenticeship programs, such as the one Ivan Hernandez completed at Werner. Hernandez was the 2020 winner of the “Transition Trucking: Driving for Excellence” award presented by Kenworth in conjunction with the Fastport Trucking Track Mentoring Program and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring our Heroes Program. - Photo: Kenworth/Fastport

Biden plans to expand registered apprenticeship programs, such as the one Ivan Hernandez completed at Werner. Hernandez was the 2020 winner of the “Transition Trucking: Driving for Excellence” award presented by Kenworth in conjunction with the Fastport Trucking Track Mentoring Program and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring our Heroes Program.

Photo: Kenworth/Fastport

President Biden has revoked an executive order issued by his predecessor that expanded apprenticeship programs in an “industry-led” model, instead announcing plans to expand the Labor Department’s registered apprenticeship programs favored by organized labor.

 

The Trump administration created “industry recognized apprenticeships.” The idea was that the Department of Labor would bring together trade and labor groups to design and certify high-quality apprenticeships appropriate for each industry, emphasizing that each industry could define its industry needs and appropriate apprenticeship programs, rather than managing apprenticeships from Washington, as then-Labor Secretary Alex Acosta explained during the American Trucking Associations Management Conference & Exhibition in 2017.

 

“You are in the best position to define what your industry needs and react to those needs…. Barriers that stood the way of apprenticeship programs are ready to come down.”

 

The IRAP model was supported by some companies for offering flexibility in training workers without the red tape of the registered apprenticeship process. As a report in Bloomberg notes, however, “the project was slow to come to fruition, as Democrats in Congress blocked funding and the implementing regulations weren’t finalized until last year.” In fact, Bloomberg points out, the first IRAP wasn’t announced until last October, when Raytheon Technologies was names as a pilot participant.

 

On Feb. 17, the same day he met with leaders of organized labor, President Biden signed an executive order revoking Trump’s June 15, 2017 (Expanding Apprenticeships in America) order.

 

Biden explained that IRAPS “threaten to undermine registered apprenticeship programs,” saying they have “fewer quality standards than registered apprenticeship programs – for example, they fail to require the wage progression that reflects increasing apprentice skills and they lack the standardized training rigor that ensures employers know they are hiring a worker with high-quality training.”

 

In addition to rescinding Executive Order 13801, which spurred the creation of these programs, Biden also asked the Department of Labor to consider a new rulemaking to reverse these programs and to immediately slow support for industry recognized apprenticeship programs by pausing approval of new Standards Recognition Entities and ending new funding for existing Standards Recognition Entities.

 

Instead, the White House announced, it will take steps to “bolster registered apprenticeships.”

“Due in large part to the hard work of North America’s Building Trades Unions and other unions, registered apprenticeships have been a reliable pathway to the middle class for decades – including for workers who don’t go to college – by training workers for good jobs and allowing them to earn while they learn,” said a Biden statement. Steps he is taking, in addition to scrapping the IRAP program, include:

  • asking the Department of Labor to reinstate the longstanding National Advisory Committee on Apprenticeships.
  • endorsing the bipartisan National Apprenticeship Act of 2021, which will create and expand registered apprenticeships, youth apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeship programs.

Bill Sullivan, executive vice president of advocacy for the American Trucking Associations, said the association "supports any program that increases opportunities for new talent to come into our industry, which included the previous administration’s apprenticeship program.

 

"While there wasn’t yet significant uptake of industry recognized apprenticeship in trucking, we believe that expanding the ways individuals can become safe and effective truck drivers should be a goal not just for our industry but for policy makers who want great career opportunities for Americans. Regardless of this policy change, we will be working with the Biden administration to continue to expand opportunities for great middle-class jobs in trucking.”

 

6 Comments
Comment
    • 1. 
    • Tom
    • February 19, 2021 @ 3:29 AM

    WOW!! Thank You Biden Administration for putting us back to a slow over regulated apprenticeship programs. We finally had a program that moved more people into a quicker more available program for jobs and back to a slower less available over regulated government program stifling jobs.

    • 2. 
    • Steve Hansen
    • February 19, 2021 @ 5:20 AM

    The only group worse than Washington to implement this in the trucking industry would be the Teamsters. Allow business to implement, trucking is losing out on the young labor to other trades. Many of these trades are coming out of High School Vo Tech and private Vo Tech. Trucking has to be allowed to develop these internally not thru Government or Union.

    • 3. 
    • Joseph Leslie
    • February 19, 2021 @ 6:35 AM

    The USA has a tremendous shortage of highly skilled technical people! Programs like this will help fill that need.

    • 4. 
    • Thomas Olsen
    • February 20, 2021 @ 4:33 PM

    Of course Biden would change the apprenticeship program back to what organized labor likes. Once again the union trucking companies get there way. The program they back doesn’t work for small independent companies and as every independent company owner knows the rules are made to cripple independents.

    • 5. 
    • Brian
    • February 22, 2021 @ 7:04 AM

    The program brought out by Trump was leaps and bounds better than this pile that Biden has come out with. But in typical fashion of Orange Man Bad, they didnt care, and blocked him, and anything he did, regardless of how good, or bad, it may have been for the US.

    • 6. 
    • Daniel Bolger
    • February 27, 2021 @ 10:55 AM

    It is disappointing in this critical time of needing many more professional truck drivers that the administration has canceled this program. All programs to train drivers to fill these critical jobs should be encouraged in a timely manner. I question whether timely efforts will result in establishing safe and adequate driver training programs. Good paying jobs are available. Let's find ways to train them to high standards in the shortest time, just like we taught pilots in crucial wartime.

 

  • Pow! 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, rw.sutton said:

May be an image of 1 person and text that says 'You ever looked at something and wonder how it got there?'

 

My guesses, left to right, top to bottom....

 

the tree was planted under the truck in the 50's...

the horse refused to move when the fence was built......

80+ million legal votes...

a punk says, "here, hold my beer. 

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

Probably not, yet they were caught....so what's the question again?

 

GO RV, then BV

Do you believe everyone crossing the border are coming to work the fields ?

  • Upvote 1
  • Pow! 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:
 
 
 
Associated Press

Biden's first 50 days: Where he stands on key promises

ALEXANDRA JAFFE
Wed, March 10, 2021, 12:10 AM
 
 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out an ambitious agenda for his first 100 days in office, promising swift action on everything from climate change to immigration reform to the coronavirus pandemic.

He hits his 50th day in office on Wednesday as his administration eyes a major milestone: final congressional passage of his massive $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid package. The bill includes direct payments to millions of Americans and money to help the White House deliver on a number of Biden's biggest campaign promises, like reopening schools and getting more Americans vaccinated.

Fifty days in, Biden has made major strides on a number of key campaign pledges for his earliest days in office, while others are still awaiting action. Where he stands on some of his major promises:

COMPLETED GOALS

Biden prioritized addressing the coronavirus pandemic during his first weeks in office, and the focus has paid off. He’s on pace to hit his goal of 100 million vaccine doses administered in his first 100 days as soon as the end of next week. The daily rate of vaccinations now averages more than 2 million shots, and more than 75 million doses have been administered since Biden was sworn in.

Biden also took took several early actions that fulfilled pledges on climate policy. He signed an executive order on Inauguration Day that revoked the permit for the Keystone XL oil pipeline, halted development of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and ordered the review of Trump-era rules on the environment, public health and science. A Jan. 27 executive order halted new oil and gas leases on federal lands and offshore waters.

Biden also easily delivered on top campaign pledges that involved rolling back Trump administration moves on everything from climate change to immigration. Early on, the Biden administration rejoined the World Health Organization and the Paris Climate Accord, halted construction of the border wall, ended travel restrictions on people from a variety of Muslim-majority countries and created a task force to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

On immigration, Biden pledged to deliver a comprehensive reform bill to Congress within his first 100 days, and it was unveiled last month, although Biden already has signaled an openness to a piece-by-piece approach if necessary. Biden also issued an executive order directing the Homeland Security secretary to “preserve and fortify” protections for young immigrants brought to the U.S. by their parents.

Biden also made some early moves to deliver on a pledge to tighten ethical standards in his administration, including a Jan. 20 executive order imposing an ethics pledge on appointees governing activities such as lobbying and taking gifts, which included prohibiting political interference in the Justice Department.

IN PROGRESS

Still other Biden promises remain a work in progress.

Biden’s national COVID-19 strategy pledged to establish 100 new, federally supported vaccination centers across the nation by the end of February. So far, the administration is at about 20 mass vaccination sites run end-to-end by the federal government and staffed by active-duty troops deployed by the Pentagon. Overall, the administration says, at least 441 vaccination sites are now federally supported. Many of those were not new sites, but nearly all have expanded capacity with the additional federal resources.

On immigration, Biden pledged to reverse the “public charge” rule put in place by the Trump administration to discourage immigrants from using public benefits, to streamline the naturalization process and to reform the U.S. asylum system within his first 100 days. An executive order he signed in early February directs the relevant agencies to review those policies and recommend changes within 60 days.

The administration has made some moves to reform the asylum system, including a move by the Department of Homeland Security on Biden’s first day in office to suspend a Trump-era program requiring asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their claims were under review. But Biden has yet to articulate a plan to manage asylum flows beyond proposing that billions of dollars be spent to address root causes in Central America.

The president has also kept in place pandemic-related powers that allow his administration to immediately expel people at the border without an opportunity to seek asylum. Biden aides have said they have no immediate plans to end the authority, which Trump introduced a year ago using an obscure 1944 public health law.

Biden also promised to end the long-term detention of migrant families. Immigration and Customs Enforcement signaled last week it plans to discontinue the use of one such facility, but ICE will continue to hold families for three days or less at two other facilities in Texas. And the Biden administration is expanding capacity at a number of long-term facilities that hold immigrant children, to address an ongoing surge of unaccompanied minors at the border.

On climate change, Biden pledged to establish enforceable commitments from other nations to reduce emissions in global shipping and aviation and to convene a climate world summit to discuss new and more ambitious pledges to address climate change, within his first 100 days. The U.S. will hold such a summit on April 22, Earth Day.

Reopening America’s schools is one of Biden’s major campaign promises that’s proven tougher to execute, in part because the decision on whether to return to in-person learning is left up to local officials and teachers’ unions. After some back-and-forth over the details of his goal, Biden said last month that his 100-day mission was to have most elementary schools open five days a week for in-person learning.

This month he directed states to prioritize vaccinating teachers and announced he was directing federal resources toward vaccinating teachers in March. The Biden administration hopes that with the passage of the coronavirus relief bill and distribution of millions in aid for schools to improve safety measures, teachers will feel more comfortable returning to in-person learning.

According to Burbio, which tracks school reopening plans, about 47% of kindergarten through 12th grade students have access to in-person school every weekday.

AWAITING ACTION

The Biden administration has yet to take significant action on criminal justice reform, aside from an executive order terminating private prison contracts. Biden pledged to set up a police oversight board within his first 100 days, but there's been no clear movement in that direction so far.

Other 100-day pledges also awaiting movement: creating a Cabinet-level working group focused on promoting union participation, and ordering an FBI review of issues with gun purchase background checks.

Some of Biden’s 100-day pledges will require congressional action, like his promise to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and increase taxes on corporations. Biden also promised to make passage of the Equality Act, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity, a priority in his first 100 days. That bill has passed the House but not the Senate.

And some of his promises are waiting on Biden’s Cabinet secretaries to be confirmed by the Senate. On gun control, Biden has said he would direct his attorney general to deliver recommendations to restructure key Justice Department agencies to more effectively enforce the nation’s gun laws. He also pledged to have his secretary of Housing and Urban Development lead a task force to create recommendations for making housing a right for all Americans.

Both his attorney general nominee, Merrick Garland, and his nominee to lead the Housing Department, Rep. Marcia Fudge, are expected to win confirmation this week.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/bidens-first-50-days-where-051008497.html

 

Hopefully this thread doesn't prove to be cringeworthy....fingers crossed.  B)

 

GO RV, then BV

Medication cost high......check

Turned his back on Israel...check

Crisis at the boarder...check

Job losses...check

Says he's for the blue collar worker and is not...check

Taxes going up..next

 

Yeah "America is BACK"

Bumbling idiot...check

  • Pow! 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Shelley said:

Do you believe everyone crossing the border are coming to work the fields ?

 

I do not....and it's not like the border has just opened up for people to flow thru.  Law enforcement is still doing it's job....they simply stopped taking land from folks to build a wall with military funds.

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

do not....and it's not like the border has just opened up for people to flow thru.  Law enforcement is still doing it's job....they simply stopped taking land from folks to build a wall with military funds.

 

You are clueless to what is going on at the border. 

  • Thanks 1
  • Pow! 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Shelley said:

Do you believe everyone crossing the border are coming to work the fields ?

 

Question for you....Do you believe American business owners hire illegal immigrants to work for pennies on the dollar?

 

GO RV, then BV

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




  • Similar Content

    • By Shabibilicious
      Amazing Amy to play for junior college national championship
        In this Aug. 28, 2019, file photo, Amy Bockerstette practices with her teaching pro at Palmbrook Country Club in Sun City, Ariz. Bockerstette is set to become the first person with Down syndrome to compete in a national collegiate athletic championship. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)   Mon, May 3, 2021, 3:56 PM     PHOENIX (AP) — Amy Bockerstette is set to become the first person with Down syndrome to compete in a national collegiate athletic championship.
      The 22-year-old golfer will play with her Paradise Valley Community College teammates at the NJCAA national championships May 10-13 at Plantation Bay Golf & Country Club in Ormond Beach, Florida.
      Bockerstette is the first person with Down syndrome to earn a college athletic scholarship and she became a viral sensation when she played the 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale with PGA Tour player Gary Woodland before the 2019 Phoenix Open. She hit into the bunker on the par-3 stadium hole and got up and down for par, telling everyone “I got this” before sinking an eight-foot putt.
      Bockerstette and her family created the I Got This Foundation in 2019 to provide golf instruction and playing opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
        The foundation has partnered with Special Skills Sports Camps to hold the Special Skills Golf Invitational June 1 at Wedgewood Golf and Country Club in Powell, Ohio. The event will teach athletes with intellectual and developmental disabilities the basics of golf, from driving to chipping and putting.
       
      https://www.yahoo.com/news/amazing-amy-play-junior-college-195654680.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
    • By Shabibilicious
      Supreme Court won't take Maryland bump stock ban case
        In this June 29, 2020 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)   Mon, May 3, 2021, 9:52 AM     WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to take up a challenge to Maryland’s ban on bump stocks and other devices that make guns fire faster.
      The high court on Monday turned away a challenge to the ban, which took effect in October 2018. A lower court had dismissed the challenge at an early stage and that decision had been upheld by an appeals court. As is typical, the court didn't comment in declining to take the case.
      Maryland's ban preceded a nationwide ban on the sale and possession of bump stocks that was put in place by the Trump administration and took effect in 2019. The Supreme Court previously declined to stop the Trump administration from enforcing that ban. Both Maryland's ban and the nationwide one followed a 2017 shooting in Las Vegas in which a gunman attached bump stocks to assault-style rifles he used to shoot concertgoers from his hotel room. Fifty-eight people were killed and hundreds were injured.
       
      https://news.yahoo.com/supreme-court-wont-maryland-bump-135212206.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
    • By Shabibilicious
      Biden and Carter, longtime allies, reconnect in Georgia
        BILL BARROW and ZEKE MILLER Thu, April 29, 2021, 2:35 PM     PLAINS, Ga. (AP) — President Joe Biden was a first-term Delaware senator in 1976 when he endorsed an upstart former Southern governor for the presidency over the party’s Northern establishment players.
      Biden came full circle Thursday, visiting Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, in tiny Plains, Georgia, where the 96-year-old former president and 93-year-old former first lady have lived for most of their lives.
      “He showed us throughout his entire life what it means to be a public servant,” Biden, 78, said of Carter for a new documentary, “CARTERLAND,” set to debut this weekend as part of the Atlanta Film Festival.
        The private meeting on Thursday brought together the oldest sitting president and the longest-lived former president in history. It was their first in-person encounter since Biden took office. The two presidents didn't appear together outside the Carters' home. Biden was seen with Rosalynn Carter at the door as he departed. The former first lady stood alongside him supported by her walker.
      Many of the 650 residents of Plains turned out to see Biden's motorcade.
      “It was great to see President Carter," Biden said Thursday night before leaving Georgia. "We sat and talked about the old days.” Biden also said Carter's health had gotten better.
      The Carters were unable to attend the Jan. 20 inauguration, the first they’d missed since Jimmy Carter was sworn in as the 39th president in 1977. The Carters have retreated from public life for most of the coronavirus pandemic, but they now are vaccinated and recently began attending church services again at Maranatha Baptist Church, where the former president taught Sunday school for decades.
      Biden's visit comes after Carter’s vice president, Walter Mondale, died April 19 at the age of 93. Carter and Biden both spoke to Mondale by phone in the days before his death.
      In his “CARTERLAND” remarks, recorded last week and made available to The Associated Press by producers Will and Jim Pattitz, Biden credits Mondale and Carter as formative figures in his political career.
      Biden noted Mondale changed the vice presidency into the kind of active role Biden would go on to play during his two terms in the post. “When President (Barack) Obama asked me to consider being his vice president, I said I had to go home and talk about it,” Biden said. “Fritz was my first call outside of my family.”
      Recalling the seeds of his friendship with Carter, Biden named the date — March 25, 1976 — he traveled to Wisconsin to make the case that the devout Baptist then from the party’s moderate wing was the right candidate to defeat President Gerald Ford.
      “Some of my colleagues in the Senate thought it was youthful exuberance,” Biden said with a laugh. “I was exuberant, but as I said then, ’Jimmy’s not just a bright smile. He can win and he can appeal to more segments of the population than any other person. ... Gov. Carter proved me right.”
      Carter didn’t endorse anyone in the 2020 primary that included Biden. But the former president warned Democrats not to veer too far left and risk alienating moderate voters needed to defeat President Donald Trump.
      There’s plenty of irony in both men’s political calculations.
      Carter wrested the 1976 nomination from the liberal Northeastern establishment and then clashed with congressional Democrats who didn’t like his technocratic, penny-pinching approach. In 1980, he endured a bruising primary challenge from liberal icon Ted Kennedy, the Massachusetts senator, and limped into a general election campaign that ended with a rout by Republican Ronald Reagan.
      By 2016, the aging former president would vote for democratic socialist Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary over the more moderate Hillarious Clinton, a choice Carter wouldn’t disclose until after Clinton lost the general election to Trump.
      Biden, meanwhile, seemed overshadowed by Sanders and other ascendant progressives early in the 2020 campaign. Biden defined his campaign mostly as a moral case against Trump, whom he described as a threat to “the soul of the nation.” The approach helped him flip several states in the general election, including Georgia, by pairing a surge in liberal turnout with support from the independents and moderate Republicans who Carter had correctly argued could be part of a winning Democratic coalition.
      Yet now, Biden is pushing a legislative agenda that would mean the largest expansion of the federal government since the adoption of Medicare, Medicaid, the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act during the mid-1960s, before either Carter or Biden had sought statewide office.
      Carter retreated from partisan politics for years after he left the White House in 1981.
      He and Rosalynn Carter focused on building The Carter Center into an organization with global reach in public health, humanitarianism and diplomacy. The center has monitored more than 110 elections in 39 countries since 1989, and it’s on the cusp of eradicating Guinea worm, a parasitic infection attributed to poor drinking water in developing nations.
      In recent decades, Carter has waded more directly into politics. He’s criticized multiple U.S. administrations for not engaging with North Korea, arguing that a hard line won't bring the autocratic, isolated nation into the world order. That left Carter somewhat aligned with Trump, even as the 39th president slammed the 45th president as a serial liar and threat to democracy.
      For years, Carter has criticized U.S. military spending, arguing it can wreak havoc globally while short-changing the kind of domestic investments competitor nations, especially China, are making. He used his 2004 speech at the Democratic National Convention to blister then-President George W. Bush for invading Iraq in 2003 — a move Biden had enabled with his vote for a war powers resolution in the Senate.
      Blasting big money in politics, Carter also has called the U.S. “an oligarchy” rather than a fully functioning “democracy.”
      That outspoken approach has meant roller-coaster relationships with his successors. But it leaves Carter with plenty to talk about with Biden, who as recently as Wednesday night in his first address of Congress framed his trillions in proposed infrastructure, education, health care and other spending as necessary to keep pace with Beijing.
      “We are in a competition with China to win the 21st century,” Biden said.
       
      https://news.yahoo.com/biden-carter-longtime-allies-reconnect-183518095.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
    • By Shabibilicious
      Supreme Court rejects lingering 2020 election challenge case
        FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2020, file photo the Supreme Court is seen as sundown in Washington. The Supreme Court says it will not hear a case out of Pennsylvania related to the 2020 election, a case that had lingered while similar election challenges had already been rejected by the justices. The high court directed a lower court to dismiss the case as moot. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) More   Mon, April 19, 2021, 10:17 AM     WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday said it will not hear a case out of Pennsylvania related to the 2020 election, a dispute that had lingered while similar election challenges had already been rejected by the justices.
      The high court directed a lower court to dismiss the case as moot.
      The justices in February, after President Joe Biden's inauguration, had rejected a handful of cases related to the 2020 election. In the case the court rejected Monday, however, the court had called for additional briefing that was not complete until the end of March.
        The case involved a federal court challenge to a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision requiring election officials to receive and count mailed-in ballots that arrived up to three days after the election. More broadly, however, the case concerned whether state lawmakers or state courts get the last word about the manner in which federal elections are carried out.
      The Democratic National Committee was among those that argued the case should be rejected as moot because the 2020 election is over. Those that brought the case said the justices should hear it because the issues involved are important and recurring.
      The court had previously rejected other cases that had involved the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's decision to extend the deadline for mail-in ballots. Three of the court's conservative justices dissented, saying they would have taken up the cases.
      The genesis of the cases were changes Pennsylvania lawmakers made to the state’s election laws in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Despite the changes, lawmakers left in place a Nov. 3 deadline to receive absentee ballots. Democrats sued, and Pennsylvania’s highest court cited the ongoing pandemic and United States Postal Service delays in extending the deadline for mailed-in ballots to be received.
      Wanda Murren, the communications director for the Pennsylvania Department of State, said Monday the elections agency is considering what to do about those ballots now, and whether they should be added to the final tally. In all, just over 10,000 ballots were received by elections officials after polls closed on Election Day, Nov. 3, but before 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 6.
      “We are pleased that yet another court ruling has affirmed the accuracy and integrity of Pennsylvania’s November 2020 election,” Murren said.
      More than 600 of the ballots received during those three days had no postmark or an illegible postmark.
      The 10,000 ballots would not have altered the outcome of the presidential election in the state, which former President Donald Trump lost by some 80,000 votes.
       
      https://news.yahoo.com/supreme-court-rejects-lingering-2020-141738101.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
    • By Shabibilicious
      Fore! Biden plays golf for the first time as president
      JONATHAN LEMIRE Sat, April 17, 2021, 2:10 PM     WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — President Joe Biden has taken his first swing at a presidential pastime: golf.
      Biden, once an avid golfer, played Saturday at the Wilmington Country Club, not far from his Delaware home where he was spending the weekend. It was his first time playing golf since taking office in January. 
      The president played with senior advisor Steve Ricchetti and Ron Olivere, father-in-law of Biden’s late son Beau, the White House said. Biden’s handicap index is just over 6, according to the United States Golf Association. But he has not logged a round since 2018.
       
      Biden is a member of the country club and played golf frequently as vice president. But his ability was mocked by former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who said once at the GOP convention that “Joe Biden told me that he was a good golfer.”
      “And I’ve played golf with Joe Biden,” Kasich continued. “I can tell you that’s not true.”
      Golf has always been a favorite of presidents; Dwight Eisenhower, George W. Bush and Barack Obama all played often.
      Biden’s predecessor, Donald Trump, played frequently, totaling over 300 rounds in his four years at office including during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic last year. Trump also would only play at country clubs he owned in Florida, Virginia and New Jersey.
       
      https://news.yahoo.com/fore-biden-plays-golf-first-181026410.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
  • Testing the Rocker Badge!

  • Live Exchange Rate

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.