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Supreme Court Won't Halt Turnover Of Trump's Tax Records


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Associated Press

Supreme Court won't halt turnover of Trump's tax records

dd7a390fff3351a3155e083e0d5b0016
 
FILE - This Nov. 5, 2020 file photo, shows the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
 
JESSICA GRESKO
Mon, February 22, 2021, 9:37 AM
 
 

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a significant defeat for former President Donald Trump, the Supreme Court on Monday declined to step in to halt the turnover of his tax records to a New York state prosecutor.

The court’s action is the apparent culmination of a lengthy legal battle that had already reached the high court once before.

Trump’s tax records are not supposed to become public as part of prosecutors' criminal investigation, but the high court’s action is a blow to Trump because he has long fought on so many fronts to keep his tax records shielded from view. The ongoing investigation the records are part of could also become an issue for Trump in his life after the presidency. Trump has called it “a fishing expedition” and “a continuation of the witch hunt — the greatest witch hunt in history.”

The Supreme Court waited months to act in the case. The last of the written briefs in the case was filed Oct. 19. But a court that includes three Trump appointees waited through the election, Trump’s challenge to his defeat and a month after Trump left office before issuing its order.

 

The court offered no explanation for the delay, and the legal issue before the justices did not involve whether Trump was due any special deference because he was president.

The court’s order is a win for Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr., who has been seeking Trump’s tax records since 2019 as part of an investigation. Vance, a Democrat, had subpoenaed the records from the Mazars accounting firm that has long done work for Trump and his businesses. Mazars has said it would comply with the subpoena, but Trump, a Republican, sued to block the records’ release.

Vance’s office had said it would be free to enforce the subpoena and obtain the records in the event the Supreme Court declined to step in and halt the records’ turnover, but it was unclear when that might happen. In a three-word statement, Vance on Monday said only: “The work continues.”

Representatives for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The case the high court ruled in involves a grand jury subpoena for more than eight years of Trump’s personal and corporate tax records. Vance has disclosed little about what prompted him to request the records. In one court filing last year, however, prosecutors said they were justified in demanding the records because of public reports of “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization.”

Part of the probe involves payments to two women — porn actress Stormy Daniels and model Karen McDougal — to keep them quiet during the 2016 presidential campaign about alleged extramarital affairs with Trump. Trump has denied the affairs.

In July, the justices in a 7-2 ruling rejected Trump’s argument that the president is immune from investigation while he holds office or that a prosecutor must show a greater need than normal to obtain the tax records.

Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, whom Trump nominated to the high court, joined that decision. It was issued before Trump’s third nominee, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, replaced the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the court.

As part of its July decision, the high court returned the Vance case and a similar case involving records sought by Congress to lower courts. And the court prevented the records from being turned over while the cases proceeded.

Since the high court’s ruling, in the Vance case, Trump’s attorneys made additional arguments that his tax records should not be turned over, but they lost again in federal court in New York and on appeal. It was those rulings that Trump had sought to put on hold.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/supreme-court-wont-halt-trump-143721951.html

 

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14 hours ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

Again, it's truly sad what you have become.  And to think you claim the moral high ground. :facepalm1:

 

 

In response to your disparaging personal remarks to me, AGAIN, I'll borrow the words from the Honorable Justice Clarence Thomas in the tweet you posted, and simply say........"I respectfully dissent".  ;)  

 

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The New York Times

Here's What's Next in the Trump Taxes Investigation

William K. Rashbaum, Ben Protess and Benjamin Weiser
Mon, February 22, 2021, 3:02 PM
 
Then-President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump at Joint Base Andrews, Md., before boarding Air Force One for the last time in office, Jan. 20, 2021. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times)
 
Then-President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump at Joint Base Andrews, Md., before boarding Air Force One for the last time in office, Jan. 20, 2021. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times)

NEW YORK — Terabytes of data. Dozens of prosecutors, investigators and forensic accountants sifting through millions of pages of financial documents. An outside consulting firm drilling down on the arcana of commercial real estate and tax strategies.

That is the monumental task that lies ahead in the Manhattan district attorney’s criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump and his family business after a U.S. Supreme Court order Monday cleared the way for prosecutors to obtain eight years worth of Trump’s tax returns and other financial records.

The brief, unsigned order was a resounding victory for the prosecutors and defeat for Trump, capping his bitter and protracted legal battle to block the release of the records — an effort that twice reached the Supreme Court — and delivering a jolt to the prosecutors’ efforts after the lawsuit stalled them for more than a year.

 

The investigation is one of two known criminal inquiries into Trump, the other coming from prosecutors in Georgia scrutinizing Trump’s effort to persuade local officials to undo the election results there. When Trump left office, he lost the protection against indictment that the presidency afforded him.

The district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr., issued a terse statement, saying: “The work continues.” A spokesman for his office declined to comment further on the investigation.

The crucial next phase in the Manhattan inquiry will begin in earnest this week when investigators for the district attorney’s office collect the records from the law firm that represents Trump’s accountants, Mazars USA, according to people with knowledge of the matter, as well as former prosecutors and other experts who described the next steps on the condition of anonymity.

The investigators, carrying a copy of the August 2019 grand jury subpoena that was at the heart of the lawsuit, will go to the law firm’s office in New York’s Westchester County. They will leave with a vast trove of digital copies of the returns, reams of financial statements and other records and communications relating to Trump’s taxes and those of his businesses.

Then, the investigators will deliver the mass of data to the office of Vance, where the team of prosecutors, forensic accountants and analysts have been investigating Trump and his companies for a wide range of possible financial crimes. Vance, a Democrat, has been examining whether Trump, his company and its employees committed insurance, tax and banking fraud, among other crimes, people with knowledge of the matter have said.

Even before the Supreme Court ruling, the investigation had heated up, with Vance’s office issuing more than a dozen subpoenas in recent months and interviewing witnesses, including employees of Deutsche Bank, one of Trump’s top lenders.

The subpoenas relate to a central aspect of Vance’s inquiry, which focuses on whether Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, inflated the value of some of his signature properties to obtain the best possible loans, while lowballing the values to reduce property taxes, people with knowledge of the matter have said. The prosecutors are also examining the Trump Organization’s statements to insurance companies about the value of various assets.

Now armed with the records from Mazars — including the tax returns, the business records on which they are based and communications between the Trump Organization and its accountants — prosecutors will be able to see a fuller picture of potential discrepancies between what the company told its lenders and tax authorities.

The prosecutors have also subpoenaed the Trump Organization for records related to tax write-offs on millions of dollars in consulting fees, some of which appear to have gone to the president’s elder daughter, Ivanka Trump, an arrangement first reported by The New York Times. The company turned over some of those records last month, two people with knowledge of the matter said, although the prosecutors have questioned whether the company has fully responded to the subpoena.

It remains unclear whether the prosecutors will ultimately file charges against Donald Trump; the company; or any of its executives, including Trump’s two adult sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump.

In a lengthy and angry statement that included a reiteration of many of his familiar grievances, Donald Trump lashed out at the Supreme Court and the investigation, which he characterized as “a continuation of the greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of our Country.”

He added: “For more than two years, New York City has been looking at almost every transaction I’ve ever done, including seeking tax returns which were done by among the biggest and most prestigious law and accounting firms in the U.S.”

Trump’s lawyers are likely to argue to prosecutors that Trump could not have duped Deutsche Bank because the bank, a sophisticated financial player, conducted its own analysis of Trump’s properties.

Mazars said in a statement that it was aware of the new ruling. “As we have maintained throughout this process, Mazars remains committed to fulfilling all of our professional and legal obligations,” the statement said.

The biggest challenge for Vance’s prosecutors will be to piece together the jigsaw puzzle of tax records, financial statements and the supporting documents Trump’s companies provided to the accountants.

Early this month, Vance enlisted a prominent figure in New York legal circles, Mark F. Pomerantz, to help with the investigation. Pomerantz, a former senior federal prosecutor with significant experience both investigating and defending complex white-collar and organized crime cases, will handle interactions with key witnesses, among other tasks.

For additional help, Vance’s office has hired FTI, a large consulting company that can analyze some of the industries in which Trump’s companies operate, including commercial real estate, as well as tax issues, people with knowledge of the matter said.

The firm will also load the trove of records into a data analysis and document management system that it can use to explore them and seek patterns in support of the investigation, the people said.

The action by the Supreme Court justices, who without noted dissent denied Trump an emergency stay so the court could fully review issues in the case for a second time, will not put Trump’s tax returns in the hands of Congress or make them automatically public. Grand jury secrecy laws will keep the records private unless Vance’s office files charges and enters the documents into evidence at a trial.

The public has already learned a great deal about Trump’s taxes through other means.

The New York Times obtained tax-return data extending over more than two decades for Trump and the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization, including detailed information from his first two years in office.

The Times published a series of investigative articles last year based on an analysis of the data showing that Trump paid virtually no income tax for many years and that he is currently under an audit in which an adverse ruling could cost him more than $100 million. He and his companies file separate tax returns and employ complicated and sometimes aggressive tax strategies, the investigation found.

But the Supreme Court’s action set in motion a series of events that could lead to the extraordinary possibility of a criminal trial for former president. At a minimum, the ruling wrests from Trump control of his most closely held financial records and the power to decide when, if ever, they would be made available for public inspection.

Trump and his lawyers have long fought to keep the records secret. After promising during the 2016 campaign that he would release his tax returns, as every presidential candidate has done for at least 40 years, he refused to do so, providing a persistent line of criticism for Democrats and other adversaries.

In addition to fighting the subpoena from Vance’s office in court, Trump sued to block the congressional subpoena and successfully challenged a California law requiring presidential primary candidates to release their returns.

The Supreme Court’s ruling comes nearly 18 months after Trump first sued Vance, seeking to block the subpoena from his office and spurring a legal battle that reached the Supreme Court for the first time last summer. In a landmark decision in July, the court rejected Trump’s argument that as a sitting president, he was immune from investigation. The case was argued by Vance’s general counsel, Carey Dunne, who is helping lead the investigation.

But the court said Trump could challenge the subpoena on other grounds, such as its relevance and scope. Trump then launched a new legal fight, arguing that the subpoena was overly broad and amounted to political harassment. After losing that argument in the lower courts, Trump asked the Supreme Court to delay enforcement of Vance’s subpoena until it could decide whether to hear Trump’s appeal.

It was that request that the Supreme Court denied, effectively ending the former president’s legal quest, legal experts said.

“Trump will not be given deference as a former president,” said Anne Milgram, a former assistant district attorney in Manhattan who later served as New Jersey’s attorney general. “Under the eyes of the laws of the state of New York, he has the same rights as others in the state. Neither more nor less.”

Reed Brodsky, a longtime white-collar defense lawyer and former federal prosecutor, said that Trump’s lawyers will likely tell him that further attempts to block the subpoena could undermine their ability to argue the merits of his defense.

“They’re at risk, if they continue to make arguments that are frivolous, of undercutting their credibility,” Brodsky said.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

© 2021 The New York Times Company

 

https://news.yahoo.com/heres-whats-next-trump-taxes-200232571.html

 

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27 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:
The New York Times

Here's What's Next in the Trump Taxes Investigation

William K. Rashbaum, Ben Protess and Benjamin Weiser
Mon, February 22, 2021, 3:02 PM
 
Then-President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump at Joint Base Andrews, Md., before boarding Air Force One for the last time in office, Jan. 20, 2021. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times)
 
Then-President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump at Joint Base Andrews, Md., before boarding Air Force One for the last time in office, Jan. 20, 2021. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times)

NEW YORK — Terabytes of data. Dozens of prosecutors, investigators and forensic accountants sifting through millions of pages of financial documents. An outside consulting firm drilling down on the arcana of commercial real estate and tax strategies.

That is the monumental task that lies ahead in the Manhattan district attorney’s criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump and his family business after a U.S. Supreme Court order Monday cleared the way for prosecutors to obtain eight years worth of Trump’s tax returns and other financial records.

The brief, unsigned order was a resounding victory for the prosecutors and defeat for Trump, capping his bitter and protracted legal battle to block the release of the records — an effort that twice reached the Supreme Court — and delivering a jolt to the prosecutors’ efforts after the lawsuit stalled them for more than a year.

 

The investigation is one of two known criminal inquiries into Trump, the other coming from prosecutors in Georgia scrutinizing Trump’s effort to persuade local officials to undo the election results there. When Trump left office, he lost the protection against indictment that the presidency afforded him.

The district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr., issued a terse statement, saying: “The work continues.” A spokesman for his office declined to comment further on the investigation.

The crucial next phase in the Manhattan inquiry will begin in earnest this week when investigators for the district attorney’s office collect the records from the law firm that represents Trump’s accountants, Mazars USA, according to people with knowledge of the matter, as well as former prosecutors and other experts who described the next steps on the condition of anonymity.

The investigators, carrying a copy of the August 2019 grand jury subpoena that was at the heart of the lawsuit, will go to the law firm’s office in New York’s Westchester County. They will leave with a vast trove of digital copies of the returns, reams of financial statements and other records and communications relating to Trump’s taxes and those of his businesses.

Then, the investigators will deliver the mass of data to the office of Vance, where the team of prosecutors, forensic accountants and analysts have been investigating Trump and his companies for a wide range of possible financial crimes. Vance, a Democrat, has been examining whether Trump, his company and its employees committed insurance, tax and banking fraud, among other crimes, people with knowledge of the matter have said.

Even before the Supreme Court ruling, the investigation had heated up, with Vance’s office issuing more than a dozen subpoenas in recent months and interviewing witnesses, including employees of Deutsche Bank, one of Trump’s top lenders.

The subpoenas relate to a central aspect of Vance’s inquiry, which focuses on whether Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, inflated the value of some of his signature properties to obtain the best possible loans, while lowballing the values to reduce property taxes, people with knowledge of the matter have said. The prosecutors are also examining the Trump Organization’s statements to insurance companies about the value of various assets.

Now armed with the records from Mazars — including the tax returns, the business records on which they are based and communications between the Trump Organization and its accountants — prosecutors will be able to see a fuller picture of potential discrepancies between what the company told its lenders and tax authorities.

The prosecutors have also subpoenaed the Trump Organization for records related to tax write-offs on millions of dollars in consulting fees, some of which appear to have gone to the president’s elder daughter, Ivanka Trump, an arrangement first reported by The New York Times. The company turned over some of those records last month, two people with knowledge of the matter said, although the prosecutors have questioned whether the company has fully responded to the subpoena.

It remains unclear whether the prosecutors will ultimately file charges against Donald Trump; the company; or any of its executives, including Trump’s two adult sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump.

In a lengthy and angry statement that included a reiteration of many of his familiar grievances, Donald Trump lashed out at the Supreme Court and the investigation, which he characterized as “a continuation of the greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of our Country.”

He added: “For more than two years, New York City has been looking at almost every transaction I’ve ever done, including seeking tax returns which were done by among the biggest and most prestigious law and accounting firms in the U.S.”

Trump’s lawyers are likely to argue to prosecutors that Trump could not have duped Deutsche Bank because the bank, a sophisticated financial player, conducted its own analysis of Trump’s properties.

Mazars said in a statement that it was aware of the new ruling. “As we have maintained throughout this process, Mazars remains committed to fulfilling all of our professional and legal obligations,” the statement said.

The biggest challenge for Vance’s prosecutors will be to piece together the jigsaw puzzle of tax records, financial statements and the supporting documents Trump’s companies provided to the accountants.

Early this month, Vance enlisted a prominent figure in New York legal circles, Mark F. Pomerantz, to help with the investigation. Pomerantz, a former senior federal prosecutor with significant experience both investigating and defending complex white-collar and organized crime cases, will handle interactions with key witnesses, among other tasks.

For additional help, Vance’s office has hired FTI, a large consulting company that can analyze some of the industries in which Trump’s companies operate, including commercial real estate, as well as tax issues, people with knowledge of the matter said.

The firm will also load the trove of records into a data analysis and document management system that it can use to explore them and seek patterns in support system" rel="">support of the investigation, the people said.

The action by the Supreme Court justices, who without noted dissent denied Trump an emergency stay so the court could fully review issues in the case for a second time, will not put Trump’s tax returns in the hands of Congress or make them automatically public. Grand jury secrecy laws will keep the records private unless Vance’s office files charges and enters the documents into evidence at a trial.

The public has already learned a great deal about Trump’s taxes through other means.

The New York Times obtained tax-return data extending over more than two decades for Trump and the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization, including detailed information from his first two years in office.

The Times published a series of investigative articles last year based on an analysis of the data showing that Trump paid virtually no income tax for many years and that he is currently under an audit in which an adverse ruling could cost him more than $100 million. He and his companies file separate tax returns and employ complicated and sometimes aggressive tax strategies, the investigation found.

But the Supreme Court’s action set in motion a series of events that could lead to the extraordinary possibility of a criminal trial for former president. At a minimum, the ruling wrests from Trump control of his most closely held financial records and the power to decide when, if ever, they would be made available for public inspection.

Trump and his lawyers have long fought to keep the records secret. After promising during the 2016 campaign that he would release his tax returns, as every presidential candidate has done for at least 40 years, he refused to do so, providing a persistent line of criticism for Democrats and other adversaries.

In addition to fighting the subpoena from Vance’s office in court, Trump sued to block the congressional subpoena and successfully challenged a California law requiring presidential primary candidates to release their returns.

The Supreme Court’s ruling comes nearly 18 months after Trump first sued Vance, seeking to block the subpoena from his office and spurring a legal battle that reached the Supreme Court for the first time last summer. In a landmark decision in July, the court rejected Trump’s argument that as a sitting president, he was immune from investigation. The case was argued by Vance’s general counsel, Carey Dunne, who is helping lead the investigation.

But the court said Trump could challenge the subpoena on other grounds, such as its relevance and scope. Trump then launched a new legal fight, arguing that the subpoena was overly broad and amounted to political harassment. After losing that argument in the lower courts, Trump asked the Supreme Court to delay enforcement of Vance’s subpoena until it could decide whether to hear Trump’s appeal.

It was that request that the Supreme Court denied, effectively ending the former president’s legal quest, legal experts said.

“Trump will not be given deference as a former president,” said Anne Milgram, a former assistant district attorney in Manhattan who later served as New Jersey’s attorney general. “Under the eyes of the laws of the state of New York, he has the same rights as others in the state. Neither more nor less.”

Reed Brodsky, a longtime white-collar defense lawyer and former federal prosecutor, said that Trump’s lawyers will likely tell him that further attempts to block the subpoena could undermine their ability to argue the merits of his defense.

“They’re at risk, if they continue to make arguments that are frivolous, of undercutting their credibility,” Brodsky said.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

© 2021 The New York Times Company

 

https://news.yahoo.com/heres-whats-next-trump-taxes-200232571.html

 

GO RV, then BV

 

Ha.....Trump is still in your head.......hope you aren't losing sleep over him.....?

CL 

 

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When all this information gets to the Grand Jury and they can't find squat, I will wait for the first bit to be leaked.

Then I will laugh when all involved get arrested on federal grand jury evidence leaking. Trump will win again.

The IRS has had ten years to find something and they have squat. 

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42 minutes ago, nstoolman1 said:

When all this information gets to the Grand Jury and they can't find squat, I will wait for the first bit to be leaked.

Then I will laugh when all involved get arrested on federal grand jury evidence leaking. Trump will win again.

The IRS has had ten years to find something and they have squat. 

 

At the end of it all, one way or another, we'll know if DJT and company was above board, and if all involved paid their fair share of taxes, like the rest of us do.

 

GO RV, then BV

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5 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

Here's What's Next in the Trump Taxes Investigation

 

I'm sorry Shabbs, but there's little respectful in your post of late. And before you go there, I'm referring to the subject of your posts, not the delivery.

REALLY?:facepalm1: After 5 plus years and still you have nothing on Trump. I doubt even you could come up as clean as Trump after such an overwhelming investigation. 

 

5 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

In response to your disparaging personal remarks to me, AGAIN, I'll borrow the words from the Honorable Justice Clarence Thomas in the tweet you posted, and simply say........"I respectfully dissent".  ;)  

 

GO RV, then BV

 

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1 hour ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

 

I'm sorry Shabbs, but there's little respectful in your post of late. And before you go there, I'm referring to the subject of your posts, not the delivery.

REALLY?:facepalm1: After 5 plus years and still you have nothing on Trump. I doubt even you could come up as clean as Trump after such an overwhelming investigation. 

 

 

 

 

LGD.....It appears POTUS Trump and Pimpy have something in Common.....Trump takes up space in Shabs Head while Pimpy does the Same in Jeff's Head and both do it Rent Free.

 

Karsten

 

 

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7 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

At the end of it all, one way or another, we'll know if DJT and company was above board, and if all involved paid their fair share of taxes, like the rest of us do.

 

GO RV, then BV

 

No worries....after 5 years of finding zero/ziltch.....they'll just have to fabricate something.....they do it all the time.....research Comey, Clapper and Clinton.....

Kind of catchy......The CCC....reminds me of the KKK.....     CL

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Oh, you can bet they will come up with a truck load of fabricated :bs:, just like they did in the 2 year $30+ million "Russia, Russia, Russia false case against Trump. Doesn't have to be true or even close to true, just another hammer to keep hitting him over the head. Sad and Pathetic!!! That's ALL they've got. They keep this phony charade going and yet do NOTHING for the good or advancement of our nation, except that truckload of payback pork in this lastest stimulus bill for their crony friends who participated in the election steal.

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On 2/22/2021 at 5:05 PM, gregp said:

People are horrible to even post this garbage.  It shows their true colors. Very dark.  

It definitely garbage, the one that speak the loudest are the one filled with all the Hate, Bullying and more then likely the most racists, all in the name of Unity...but it actually divide.... 

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14 hours ago, coorslite21 said:

 

No worries....after 5 years of finding zero/ziltch.....they'll just have to fabricate something.....they do it all the time.....research Comey, Clapper and Clinton.....

Kind of catchy......The CCC....reminds me of the KKK.....     CL

 

Of course now, DJT doesn't have executive privilege to hide behind....In his business life, before ascending to the White House, the multiple bankruptcies, the Trump University grift, and the Trump Foundation grift, were very real events.....so much so, he was forced to pay millions in restitution to swindled Trump U victims....and his Foundation was forced to shutter for illegal practices.

 

GO RV, then BV

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19 hours ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

 

I'm sorry Shabbs, but there's little respectful in your post of late. And before you go there, I'm referring to the subject of your posts, not the delivery.

REALLY?:facepalm1: After 5 plus years and still you have nothing on Trump. I doubt even you could come up as clean as Trump after such an overwhelming investigation. 

 

 

On 2/22/2021 at 4:46 PM, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

Again, it's truly sad what you have become.  And to think you claim the moral high ground. :facepalm1:

 

Then refer to the actual articles themselves, and stop making it personal.

 

GO RV, then BV

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26 minutes ago, Shabibilicious said:

he was forced to pay millions in restitution to swindled Trump U victims....and his Foundation was forced to shutter for illegal practices.

 

So Shabs, you are saying the system worked and Trump made resitution? Sounds like the capitalist system worked as it should, but I am sure that won't be enough for the Rats. He MUST be DESTROYED at any cost to teach the naives the lesson they NEED to learn. Forget all the lies and false documentation they threw at Trump and ALL the child abuse and trafficking from our politicians. Anyone gonna be brought to justice and pay the price? Nope, the one man that did more for this country than ANYONE in my lifetime other than Reagan, has to be made to pay for daring to put a road block in the way of the Rats who want to finish this country off for good and who has awaken the silent middle class in a way NO ONE has been able to do, to the point that the Rats are scared to death that they may not get back the contol they had and seek. Or perhaps, THEY may actually be brought to justice for the crimes they have commintted against this country and our citizens. JMHO!

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5 minutes ago, md11fr8dawg said:

So Shabs, you are saying the system worked and Trump made resitution? Sounds like the capitalist system worked as it should, but I am sure that won't be enough for the Rats. He MUST be DESTROYED at any cost to teach the naives the lesson they NEED to learn. Forget all the lies and false documentation they threw at Trump and ALL the child abuse and trafficking from our politicians. Anyone gonna be brought to justice and pay the price? Nope, the one man that did more for this country than ANYONE in my lifetime other than Reagan, has to be made to pay for daring to put a road block in the way of the Rats who want to finish this country off for good and who has awaken the silent middle class in a way NO ONE has been able to do, to the point that the Rats are scared to death that they may not get back the contol they had and seek. Or perhaps, THEY may actually be brought to justice for the crimes they have commintted against this country and our citizens. JMHO!

 

Nobody is above the law, fr8dawg, Dems included.

 

GO RV, then BV

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23 hours ago, Shabibilicious said:

 

At the end of it all, one way or another, we'll know if DJT and company was above board, and if all involved paid their fair share of taxes, like the rest of us do.

 

GO RV, then BV

Shabs, please post your taxes, we all want to really see the True Shabs!

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      President Joe Biden wrongly claimed the U.S. vaccinated a record 2.9 million people on Saturday while his special adviser on the pandemic exaggerated the share of older Americans who've been fully immunized.
      A look at how their statements compare with the facts:
      BIDEN: “On Saturday, we hit a record of 2.9 million vaccinations in one day in America.”
      ANDY SLAVITT, special adviser to the White House virus task force: “On Saturday, we set an all-time, single-day record: nearly 3 million Americans vaccinated — a pace seen nowhere else in the world.” — leading off a task force briefing.
      THE FACTS: The claim is off base.
      The government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 2.9 million doses were recorded Saturday but that total comes from multiple days of vaccinations. Only 1.56 million doses were administered Saturday, as currently reported by the CDC.
      That's far from a one-day record. The most productive day for vaccinations was Feb. 26, when 2.8 million doses were administered.
      Although vaccinations have greatly increased overall in recent weeks, Saturday's total is barely above the number of doses administered the day Biden took office.
      ___
      SLAVITT: “In terms of protecting the most vulnerable — our core duty as a nation — when we came into office, 8% of people over 65 were vaccinated. Today, 60% are vaccinated. And according to the CDC’s new guidance, vaccinated parents can now visit and hug their grandchildren — and, in most circumstances, without wearing a mask.”
      THE FACTS: This is wrong. He is counting people who have received only their first dose as immune and able to mingle. Public health officials stress that only fully vaccinated people can safely be around each other and low-risk people without the distancing and masking recommended for the population at large.
      The CDC says 61% of people over 64 have received at least one dose but only 31% are fully vaccinated.
      The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines each require two doses, spread several weeks apart. The newer Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires only one dose. In all cases, it takes two weeks to build immunity after being fully vaccinated.
       
      https://www.yahoo.com/news/ap-fact-check-biden-admin-230538904.html
       
      GO RV, then BV
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