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Expert Warns Lack Of Sleep Changes DNA Behavior, Can Lead To Weight Gain, High Blood Pressure

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Expert Warns Lack Of Sleep Changes DNA Behavior, Can Lead To Weight Gain, High Blood Pressure

An alarming new survey of British adults finds just 17% log the recommended eight hours of sleep a night.

LONDON — Everyone knows sleep is important, but that doesn’t stop millions from staying up late and neglecting their beauty rest each night. There’s no shortage of research showing how lack of ample sleep can affect one’s mental health, but experts also warn that it also raises the risk of heart disease, may lead to weight gain, and can even change the way our DNA behaves.

The warning comes with a recent survey of 2,000 British adults that shows only 17% regularly enjoy the recommended eight hours of sleep each night. While the rest of us might expect to be a bit tired after a sleepless night, the extreme impact an inadequate sleep schedule can have on the human body may surprise you. Paul Gringras, professor of sleep medicine at Evelina London, says that consistent lack of sleep can be very dangerous.

 

“Those people who sleep under six hours have a higher risk of coronary heart disease, their blood pressure is higher and their cholesterol is worse,” Gringras comments in a media release. “Our lack of sleep as a nation has been compared to ‘the canary in the coalmine’, in that poor sleep is linked to so many other serious health issues.”

The survey, funded by sleep tech company Simba, also found that 44% of respondents are only sleeping for a maximum of six hours per night — two hours less than the often recommended eight hours.

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According to Gringras, individuals who consistently don’t get enough quality sleep are 60% more at risk of having a heart attack, high blood pressure, or a stroke. Additionally, the body is believed to produce more inflammatory proteins called cytokines after a poor night’s sleep. These proteins can have a detrimental effect on the immune system.

Beyond these concerns, poor sleep habits can even change one’s DNA.

“Every cell in our body contains the same DNA, our genetic code. And people used to think that was that – your genes were who you are – and nothing could affect it,” Gringas explains. “But, our DNA, and how our body knows what to do with it, is in fact susceptible to changes from outside factors – what we eat, whether we smoke, how stressed we are, and how we sleep.

 

Gringas says that while sleep, or lack thereof, doesn’t actually change our DNA, it can impact the signals that control how our genes operate on a day-to-day basis.

 

“Just one night’s bad sleep changes epigenetic signals to our DNA that cause weight gain and loss of muscle mass, and can affect the way that memories are laid down in the hippocampus – part of our brains,” Gringas clarifies.

Sleep is also significantly linked to everyday athletic performance as well as decision-making. After a sleepless night, people are more likely to make reckless decisions and act impulsively. Additionally, a lack of sleep can dull a person’s reaction time and accuracy.

 

If you’re looking for a way to improve your sleep patterns, Gringas recommends exercising on a daily basis; 85% of the survey’s respondents reported improvements in their sleeping patterns after beginning an exercise routine.

 

 

https://www.studyfinds.org/expert-warns-lack-of-sleep-changes-dna-behavior-weight-gain-high-blood-pressure/

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As a trucker that has worked 14 plus hour a day for the last 28 yrs I can guarantee you that this is a fact. 

And much worse than even this report shows, I've often told my wife that if we were to hit the Lotto or if 

the dinar ever revalues I would literally need at LEAST one year of doing nothing but sleep and rest before 

I would consider myself resembling anything that is considered normal. 

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3 hours ago, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

I would literally need at LEAST one year of doing nothing but sleep and rest before 

I would consider myself resembling anything that is considered normal. 

i would venture to say that you would need at least three years to detune your nervous system to get into a healthy ramge of physiological function. it is a journey of rediscovering what a normal experience of life really feels like. Gettimg a nervous system reset will add years to you life and is far outside the purview of western medicine. you can more easily facilitate your journey utilizing alernative health prpfessionals that focus on health optimization rther than symptom chasing.

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38 minutes ago, adhoc10 said:

i would venture to say that you would need at least three years to detune your nervous system to get into a healthy ramge of physiological function. it is a journey of rediscovering what a normal experience of life really feels like. Gettimg a nervous system reset will add years to you life and is far outside the purview of western medicine. you can more easily facilitate your journey utilizing alernative health prpfessionals that focus on health optimization rther than symptom chasing.

I agree, but as a single income family of 4 funds are limited. I've found that extensive vitamin and herbal support over the 

years do wonders. But I've also recently gotten into meditative prayer that does wonders also. As stated, given the RV or 

hitting the lotto I'm very limited to what I can do.

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On 9/1/2019 at 9:04 PM, ladyGrace'sDaddy said:

But I've also recently gotten into meditative prayer that does wonders also.

Meditation is a powerful step in the right direction. It does take significant dedication to achieve the results that are possible. Ultimately you want it to calm your body down so it can restore it's own natural rhythms.What I mean by that is your body has to resolve it's fight or flight conditioning.  There are many types and practices of meditation. You can compare your progress by you ability to handle more of the challenges that life brings your way without going into a reaction mode.   I have been studying the neurological affects of traumatic events for going on 26 years now and can say that most of our nations citizens are living in a constant state of fight or flight, Sleep and meditation are two of the ways that disengage our awareness from the multitude of thoughts that get expressed at a physiological level,.

I have discovered a few hacks that can accelerate the unwinding process, I can pass them on to you if you are interested, just send me a personal note.

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After working a 7 on 7 off night/day shift of 12.5 hours for 10 years and then retiring I get my normal hours of sleep and am more relaxed, 

according to my wife. I would work 7 day shifts then a week off and then do 7 night shifts. My internal clock would only let me sleep

about 3-4 hours during the day on night shift. Day shift I slept fine. I don't miss it one bit.

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