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yota691

Sadr: Regions are not a solution and will facilitate your occupation

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March 26, 2019 | 12:26 PM   - The   number of readings: 18 views
 
Sadr returns to Najaf



Iraqi Position Network
 

A source close to the source said on Tuesday that the leader of the Sadrist movement Moqtada al-Sadr returned to Najaf province.

The source said the "Iraqi position" that "the leader of the Sadrist movement Moqtada al-Sadr returned to the province of Najaf, after a trip outside the country," without giving more details.

 
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3 hours ago, yota691 said:

after a trip outside the country,

 

Another episode in the perpetuating Bicraqi Iraqi saga, "As The Quagmire Continuously Thickens"!!!

 

WHAT, pray tell, Country WAS Moqtada al-Sadr returning FROM AND WHAT, pray tell, was Moqtada al-Sadr's PURPOSE in VISITING THAT Country???!!!

 

Maybe BABY REFORMS to be implemented PRONTO TONTO???!!!

 

Hey, the guy in the picture seems to be saying, "I heard about Your keester being kicked "visit" AND I would git 'er dun NOW if I were YOU!!!" AND Moqtada al-Sadr grimmaces in response, "I know but HOW did YOU find out about THAT???!!!"!!!

 

In The Mean Time...................................................................

 

Go Moola Nova (YEAH AND YEE HAW, BABY, READY WHEN YOU ARE BROTHER (OR SISTER) - LET 'ER BUCK!!!)!!!

:rodeo:   :pirateship:

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My "oldfartsheimer's" prevents me from remembering where, I read it, but I'm sure I read he was ill and was expected to be back in action this week.  My best guess would be a secret hospital visit to the UK or some such.  He is not well liked in Iran where they are upset with him threatening to overthrow their puppet Mahdi and re-install Abaadi..

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BAGHDAD - The return of Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr to Iraq after spending three months in the Lebanese capital Beirut is expected to revive life in the Iraqi political scene, which has been stagnant since the formation of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi's government in October.

Sadr returned to his headquarters in the Hananah district of the Shi'ite holy city of Najaf, citing a series of rumors about his health condition.

Sadr is close to the third month without any comment on the developments of the political situation after being strongly active through social media during the first phase of negotiations to form a government.

Even when Sadr wanted to comment on US President Donald Trump's recognition of Israel's sovereignty over the Syrian Golan, the statement was issued on behalf of his own office, not in his own name.

Since Sadr's absence, the effectiveness of political deliberation has dwindled and negotiations for the completion of the cabinet cabins, which are still short of four portfolios, including the defense and interior portfolios, have been frozen.

The return of Sadr one day announcement of an unprecedented meeting between Abdul Mahdi and the reform alliance, headed by Ammar al-Hakim is the largest bloc in the parliament and includes the coalition, "Sarun" sponsored by the leader of the Sadrist movement.

Observers predict that Sadr's return may be linked to a new political movement leading to the completion of the ministerial cab. But dependence on the internal Iraqi situation of external factors, most notably the repercussions of the US-Iranian conflict may hinder the major understandings between the parties in Baghdad. Almost all major files in Iraq are linked to the US-Iranian conflict, which has produced two distinct fronts in Iraqi politics.

While the most prominent Sunni representatives, all of the Kurdish forces, some Shiite political parties, former Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, and the leader of the reformist coalition, Ammar al-Hakim, stand on the US side, most of the forces of the hardline Shiite right line up alongside Iran.

On this basis, the positions of the political parties are formulated from the candidate for the portfolio of the interior, for example, and how close he is to Washington or Tehran. Therefore, major files in the country are suspended, waiting for an external index.

Al-Sadr's return coincides with reports of a close political consensus on filling the vacancy at the head of the interior and defense ministries, which are still being run by the agency, despite the importance they attach to the delicate security situation and sensitivity.

However, a source close to Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi confirmed on Wednesday, "postponement of the resolution of the Ministries of Interior and Defense at the moment because of the lack of consensus on the names of candidates," stressing that all names put forward to take over the ministries are "mere speculation."

Dependence on the internal situation of Iraq to external factors hinder progress in several files, including the ministerial cabinet update file

But the same source told Alsumaria News website that the names of candidates will soon be submitted to the Ministries of Justice and Education in the government of Abdul Mahdi.

Sadr has declared positions that include what some call "the insurgency" on the American and Iranian fronts, one of the reasons for his popularity, which gives him political weight that can move the stagnant political atmosphere in Baghdad, given his freedom from external commitments and his reliance on the support of a broad popular trend.

Sadr is the clearest example of the great power of Iraq's political parties in return for a clear government deficit in the political file.

The Iraqi Prime Minister initiated the movement of several files such as lifting the concrete blocks that besieged the important government buildings in Baghdad and the launch of a project to distribute residential land to the poor, but he avoided the political file and ignore the fact that he could not complete his cabin incomplete from very important bags.

Abdul Mahdi's meeting with the Reform Alliance is seen in al-Hakim's house as the first important step in efforts to restore the internal political situation.

With regard to the US-Iraqi conflict, Abdul-Mahdi knows that his government will not be able to take its own course without the intervention of the powerful political forces, especially in the absence of a clear parliamentary cover, but the reform and construction do not recognize their responsibility for this cab.

The Arabs

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Al-Sadr is an idiot: The Arab Spring is renewed in Algeria and Sudan

Political | 08:46 - 31/03/2019

 
image
 
 

BAGHDAD - Mawazine News The 
leader of the Sadrist movement, Moqtada al-Sadr, Sunday, on the demonstrations and protests taking place in Algeria and Sudan, noting that the Arab Spring is renewed in these two countries. 
Al-Sadr, in a tweet on the social networking site (Twitter), was seen by Mawazin News: "After being fueled in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Bahrain and kidnapped from Syria and Yemen .. Today is glowing again in (Sudan) and (Algeria) "And wished" victory for the peoples that have risen for the sake of change and salvation from tyrants and their oppression and injustice. " 
He called for "the union of all peoples because in the Union is a strong force eye for us and them," warning them of "militancy, disintegration and occupation." 
He called for "the union of the wise to end the suffering of (Syria) and (Yemen) to stop their wounds and to step down their rulers to end the unjust wars in them."
He added: "To be responsible to the Trump Union and (Netanyahu), I call on everyone to end sectarianism and the spirit of Islam, Arabism, humanism and abandon hostile policies."

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After the absence of 3 months .. / Mawazin News / published pictures of the first public appearance of the chest in Najaf

Political | 12:26 - 01/04/2019

 
image
 
 

 

BAGHDAD - Mawazine News 
/ Mawazine News / Monday, pictures of the leader of the Sadrist movement Muqtada al-Sadr in the first public appearance after an absence lasted three months. 
Sadr returned after an absence for more than three months, to the city of Najaf, (Monday, March 25, 2019) from Beirut. Although there has been no comment from the Special Office on the reasons for the long absence and return, it has at least cast doubt on the period of absence, and the hypothesis was suggested that the disease was the reason for the absence of the leader of the Sadrist movement.

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6 minutes ago, yota691 said:

He added: "To be responsible to the Trump Union and (Netanyahu), I call on everyone to end sectarianism and the spirit of Islam, Arabism, humanism and abandon hostile policies."

Who called him an idiot? This sounds like he is siding with President Trump and Israel. If so, this is big and will put him in the cross hairs of the radicals over there.

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LOL ariblish can be fun ... he saying they are tied to PRES Trump and  (Netanyahu).

Edited by danielchu
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7 hours ago, danielchu said:

LOL ariblish can be fun ... he saying they are tied to PRES Trump and  (Netanyahu).

Sounds like strong sexual overtones there - tied to Pre. Trump/Netanyahu.

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8 hours ago, 8th ID said:

Who called him an idiot? This sounds like he is siding with President Trump and Israel. If so, this is big and will put him in the cross hairs of the radicals over there.

I believe the translation is misleading because if one can go by historical behavior, Sadr would never want an alliance with anyone in the U.S. and most certainly not any Israeli. I believe he is calling for an alliance of all the Arab states against Trump and Netanyahu. Jmho. 

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Sadr is smart like a fox. He got Obama to lift the sanctions on Iran, and he got the US out of Iraq. He’s a genius or he took advantage of a weak President

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2 minutes ago, Pitcher said:

Sadr is smart like a fox. He got Obama to lift the sanctions on Iran, and he got the US out of Iraq. He’s a genius or he took advantage of a weak President

 

Right on Iranian Sanctions, US out of Iraq & a weak POTUS but also a sympathetic Muslin.

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With Sadr returning, perhaps they’ll complete the formation of the government by end of 2019. 

Hey, if I set my expectations real low, chances are I won’t be too disappointed.

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24 minutes ago, Bama Girl said:

I believe the translation is misleading because if one can go by historical behavior, Sadr would never want an alliance with anyone in the U.S. and most certainly not any Israeli. I believe he is calling for an alliance of all the Arab states against Trump and Netanyahu. Jmho. 

 

You're right, Bama Girl.

He hates Trump and Netanyahu and thinks we are occupiers of Iraq.

(My comments in blue.)

 

"He called for "the union of all peoples (Arabs) because in the Union (of Arabs) is a strong force eye for us and them," warning them of "militancy, disintegration and occupation." 

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On 4/1/2019 at 6:24 PM, In this since 2004 said:

Does anyone know, verbatim, what the arab spring incudes?

This info may help in understanding of the Arab Spring:

What Is the Arab Spring? 

The Arab Spring was a loosely related group of protests that ultimately resulted in regime changes in countries such as Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. Not all of the movements, however, could be deemed successful—at least if the end goal was increased democracy and cultural freedom.

In fact, for many countries enveloped by the revolts of the Arab Spring, the period since has been hallmarked by increased instability and oppression.

Given the significant impact of the Arab Spring throughout northern Africa and the Middle East, it’s easy to forget the series of large-scale political and social movements arguably began with a single act of defiance.

Jasmine Revolution 

The Arab Spring began in December 2010 when Tunisian street vendor Mohammed Bouazizi set himself on fire to protest the arbitrary seizing of his vegetable stand by police over failure to obtain a permit.

Bouazizi’s sacrificial act served as a catalyst for the so-called Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia.

The street protests that ensued in Tunis, the country’s capital, eventually prompted authoritarian president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to abdicate his position and flee to Saudi Arabia. He had ruled the country with an iron fist for more than 20 years.

Activists in other countries in the region were inspired by the regime change in Tunisia—the country’s first democratic parliamentary elections were held in October 2011—and began to protest similar authoritarian governments in their own nations.

The participants in these grassroots movements sought increased social freedoms and greater participation in the political process. Notably, this includes the Tahrir Square uprisings in Cairo, Egypt and similar protests in Bahrain.

However, in some cases, these protests morphed into full-scale civil wars, as evidenced in countries such as Libya, Syria and Yemen.

Arab Spring Aftermath 

While the uprising in Tunisia led to some improvements in the country from a human-rights perspective, not all of the nations that witnessed such social and political upheaval in the spring of 2011 changed for the better.

Most notably, in Egypt, where early changes arising from the Arab Spring gave many hope after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, authoritarian rule has apparently returned. Following the controversial election of Mohamed Morsi in 2012, a coup led by defense minister Abdel Fattah el-Sisi installed the latter as president in 2013, and he remains in power today.

Muammar Gaddafi 

In Libya, meanwhile, authoritarian dictator Colonel Muammar Gaddafiwas overthrown in October 2011, during a violent civil war, and he was tortured (literally dragged through the streets) and executed by opposition fighters. Video footage of his death was seen by millions online.

However, since Gaddafi’s downfall, Libya has remained in a state of civil war, and two opposing governments effectively rule separate regions of the country. Libya’s civilian population has suffered significantly during the years of political upheaval, with violence in the streets and access to food, resources and healthcare services severely limited. 

This has contributed, in part, to the ongoing worldwide refugee crisis, which has seen thousands flee Libya, most often by boat across the Mediterranean Sea, with hopes of new opportunities in Europe.

 

https://www.history.com/topics/middle-east/arab-spring

 

 

Edited by Bama Girl
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On 4/1/2019 at 1:29 PM, Pitcher said:

Sadr is smart like a fox. He got Obama to lift the sanctions on Iran, and he got the US out of Iraq. He’s a genius or he took advantage of a weak President

Weak president.

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Sadr: Regions are not a solution and will facilitate your occupation

Political | 08:21 - 07/04/2019

 

https://www.mawazin.net/Details.aspx?jimare=41655

 

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BAGHDAD ( 
Reuters) - Sadr's leader Moqtada al-Sadr on Sunday warned of the creation of Iraqi provinces and said they would ease the occupation. 
"The unified Iraq that the regions will of the oppressed people want to end their suffering, but the provinces is not a solution," Sadr said in a tweet on Twitter. 
He added: "The officials of the region will facilitate your theft and will prevent corruption and injustice and will dominate us and you aspiring from inside and outside will enjoy your wealth more .. And weaken you and facilitate (your occupation)." 
He added: "The people of Iraq: Keep your Iraq one unified land and people, this is my advice to you and the matter first and last for the people."

 

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2019/04/07 20:22
 

Sadr: Regions will of the oppressed people want to end their suffering

 

BAGHDAD / Al-Masala: The leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, Sunday, April 7, 2019, in his blog on Twitter and followed by "obituary", that the regions will of the oppressed people wants to end their suffering.

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Well just how could you folks end the suffering of the oppressed  ? Endless running of the mouth on any subject never solves anything . . . it requires the will to act, to implement to see it through. . . and to persevere. Just for openers.

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These mouths piss me off so much. All they do is point fingers and act like they got a pair. What a joke! We all know they will never follow through. 

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Monday، 08 April 2019 02:39 PM

Cleric Sadr says Basra's independence 'not a solution', calls for unity

 

Image1_420198143853304269916.png

 

 

Monday، 08 April 2019 02:39 PM

Cleric Sadr says Basra's independence 'not a solution', calls for unity

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Influential Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr tweeted on Monday that turning Basra into an autonomous region is “not the solution.”

The Basra provincial council unanimously voted on Monday to turn the oil-rich southern governorate into an autonomous region.

 

Sadr posted on Twitter that turning Basra into a region would weaken it and makes it easier for its resources to get stolen by officials and outsiders.

He also called upon Iraqis to maintain the unity of their country, even if the decision was the result of the will of Basra’s oppressed residents.

Head of the Basra provincial council, Sabah Al-Bazoni, told reporters that as many as 20 council members voted in favour of turning Basra into an autonomous region, more than the 12 votes needed.

Al-Bazoni explained that the council has formed a committee to follow up on the results and to support efforts that are consistent with the region’s vision.

“All this aims to take Basra’s administrative and financial benefits from the federal government, in accordance with the Constitution,” he added.

Edited by 6ly410
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I think Sadr knows the Iranians are trying to ****** Basra (divide and conquer). So, his national agenda centralizes power within Iraq. Not necessarily a bad ideal to pursue, considering what we know about the disruptive nature of the Quds presence in Basra.

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