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Iranian official calls for negotiations with Washington in Iraq

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Mad Man Theory, look it up.  Kissinger used it back in the 70's. Trump pushing the bad guys buttons.   

 

They are just letting Iran know US isn't going to put up with Iran's proxy war's in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon, etc, etc.

 

I read last night that Israel, US, Jordan, and the Palestine are getting close on a peace deal.  If Iran, Russia, and Syria would get out of the way we could have peace in the ME.  

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21 minutes ago, Pitcher said:

Mad Man Theory, look it up.  Kissinger used it back in the 70's. Trump pushing the bad guys buttons.   

 

They are just letting Iran know US isn't going to put up with Iran's proxy war's in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon, etc, etc.

 

I read last night that Israel, US, Jordan, and the Palestine are getting close on a peace deal.  If Iran, Russia, and Syria would get out of the way we could have peace in the ME.  

Russia is running this show, what Russia wants Russia will get. Trump LOVES Russia/Putins, 

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Washington appoints an expert on the "list of terrorism" because of a preacher

 Twilight News    

 3 hours ago

The United States on Thursday imposed sanctions on a Frenchman accused of helping to promote the deployment of chemical weapons on the battlefield in Syria and included him on the "global terrorism list." 

"The Frenchman Joe Esperman, a senior chemical weapons expert in the organization of Dahesh, supervised the production of chemical weapons for deployment on the front line in Syria for the organization," the Justice Ministry said in a statement. 

Hundreds of French people have joined the ranks of an up-and-coming organization but have not yet publicly appeared, the name of Joe Esperman, as quick research on the Internet has shown. 

The US Treasury Department estimates that Joe Esperman was born between 1986 and 1988 in the vicinity of Cannes in southeastern France. 

In addition to Esperman, the Ministry of Justice has also included the Imam Bukhari Battalion, the armed group it considers an al Qaeda ally and the largest Uzbek combat force in Syria.


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9 hours ago, Barbara020548 said:

Russia is running this show

It was Russia, Russia, Russia fault for re electing Putin...:lol:

 

9 hours ago, Barbara020548 said:

what Russia wants Russia will get. Trump LOVES Russia/Putins, 

are you related to Barbara Walters...

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Al-Jubeir directs a threat: Iran must give up this or pay the price

Al-Jubeir directs a threat: Iran must give up this or pay the price
 


 Twilight News    
 15 hours ago

"Iran must abandon its aggressive policies or pay the price," Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir said on Friday, pointing out that Tehran must stop violating international laws, supporting terrorism and interfering in the affairs of the countries of the region.

Asked about the nuclear deal with Iran, al-Jubair said: "The agreement has gaps in two key points: First, when the agreement expires 8 years later, Iran will re-enrich uranium, and it will be able to make nuclear bombs within weeks, .

"Secondly, the investigation of its nuclear program must be more comprehensive and include unauthorized military centers and installations to ensure that Iran is not involved in any violations," he told a news conference in the United States.

He continued: "This agreement does not deal with the destructive policy and sabotage of Iran, they violate international law on ballistic missiles and must be held accountable."

He pointed out that there are discussions with European countries and the United States "to know how to deal with the problem of Iran in a comprehensive manner," pointing out that "must be considered other means to ensure that Iran gave up its aggressive policy, or have to pay the price."

The kingdom suffered from Iranian aggression

Al-Jubeir responded to a question about a statement by the Iranian Foreign Minister saying that Iran is ready to defend Saudi Arabia in the event of an attack, saying that Iran is "the last to speak about protecting the kingdom." He stressed that "it is Allah and the sons of Saudi Arabia who are protecting it."

"The kingdom has suffered since the Khomeini revolution in 1979 from the Iranian aggression in all fields," he said, adding that Iran had carried out terrorist operations inside Saudi Arabia, assassinated Saudi diplomats and supplied terrorists with ballistic missiles to attack the kingdom.

"If Iran wants to have a role in the region, it must change its aggressive policies and abandon the principle of exporting the revolution, and abide by international laws and non-interference in the affairs of others and respect for good neighborliness."

"Iran is devastating in Yemen"

"Iran has no role to play in Yemen, it is devastating only there, by supplying ballistic missiles to the Houthi militia, who are launching rockets against civilians in Yemen and Saudi Arabia," he said.

"Iran has not spent a dollar to help Yemen, while Saudi Arabia has spent a lot of money to help the Yemeni brothers. We have a history and a common destiny with Yemen. It is in our interest to ensure that Yemen is stable, peaceful and united."

"We believe that the Huthis can play a role in Yemen, but it must be a role commensurate with their size, they can not control Yemen," he said.

"Qatar's rejection of the list of terrorism shows its support for him"

As for the Qatari crisis, the Saudi foreign minister said that Qatar's rejection of the list of terrorism by the four countries boycotting Qatar constitutes a "confirmation" of Doha funding for terrorism.

"We are saying that there is no problem for Qatar to admit the mistake," he said, by taking action against those who support terrorism.

Al-Jubeir stressed that "the conflict with Qatar has nothing to do with the US-Saudi relations" and that the issue of Qatar is Gulf and will be resolved in the Gulf.

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Germany selling Iran chemical weapons tech, boosting anti-Israel efforts

March 22 2018 01:10 PM
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U.S. officials are increasingly alarmed by a congressional block on President Donald Trump's pick to be the next ambassador to Germany, a holdup that comes as Berlin pursues a host of anti-Israel measures and is growing closer to Iran, according to multiple administration insiders who spoke to the Washington Free Beacon.


As Democrats in Congress continue to hold the nomination of Richard Grenell, a veteran Republican diplomat who was tapped by Trump to serve as the next U.S. ambassador to Germany, the post remains vacant, sparking concerns the United States is ceding leverage amid sensitive discussions regarding the future of the landmark Iran nuclear deal.


The vacancy also has left the United States with little voice to combat a series of anti-Israel efforts being pursued by the German government. Trump administration insiders are becoming increasingly fed-up with the block on Grenell, telling the Free Beacon that U.S. diplomats currently helming the post have been bungling critical national security priorities, including the Iran portfolio and recent efforts by Germany to sell Tehran sensitive equipment used by the Bashar al-Assad regime in Syria to produce chemical weapons.


"The current leader of the embassy is not an ambassador," said one senior U.S. official with direct knowledge of the situation, referring to Kent Logsdon, a former Obama administration official who is serving as the chargé d'affaires ad interim in Berlin.


"He is perfectly nice and steeped in the State Department culture, but irrelevant to serious policy makers," the official said. "He oversees a team that promotes a normalized relationship with Iran and has promoted anti-Trump speakers throughout Germany."


Grenell's absence on the international stage has only become more noticeable in recent months, as the Trump administration pursues a last minute diplomatic effort to strengthen the Iran deal or scrap it by May, sources said.


The Free Beacon first reported that former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was ousted from the administration due in large part to his efforts to walk back a series of demands by Trump that European allies crackdown on Iran's ballistic missile program.


As negotiations continue, administration insiders have cited Germany as a prime roadblock in these discussions.


German officials have declined to go along with a bid to crackdown on Tehran's ballistic missile program, which includes scores of medium-range rockets capable of striking Israel and sparking a regional war.


Recent reports also indicate that Germany is likely selling Iran technology that is being used to help the Syrian regime replenish chemical weapons stocks.


America is failing to exert its diplomatic muscle in Germany as Grenell's nomination languishes in Congress amid fierce opposition by Democrats.


"The Germans have become key facilitators for Iran's dual use material and technology imports," said one Trump administration insider who works closely with the White House on Iran issues. "These are goods that ostensibly look civilian but can be used to help Iran advance its missile and nuclear programs."


"In talks with American negotiators, Germany has made it clear it does not believe Iran's missiles should be subject to a snapback of sanctions waived by the nuclear deal," the source disclosed. "Instead, the Germans say the West should simply keep waiving sanctions and offer to negotiate with Iran on its missile program by offering the regime more economic incentives in exchange for JCPOA-like concessions on missiles."


This has caused a tense diplomatic situation that has been exacerbated by the lack of a U.S. ambassador in Germany, the source said.


"At a time like this, we need a strong-willed, pro-Israel American ambassador in Berlin," said the source. "That man in Rick Grenell.  The sooner he hits the ground, the sooner we start taking it to the Germans for dragging their feet on Iranian missiles."


As the Iran issue takes top billing, Germany has also come under criticism for a series of anti-Israel efforts opposed by the United States.


In the latest kerfuffle, Germany has been blocking efforts by Israel to join the United Nations Security Council. Israel's presence on the council could send a significant international message and help thwart efforts by Arab nations to delegitimize the Jewish state at Turtle Bay.


There, too, Grenell could have an influence, sources say, referring to his vocal support of the Jewish state and efforts to combat deligitimization efforts.


Germany also has refused to take a tough line on the Iranian-tied terror group Hezbollah, according to recent report.


The German government is said to be opposed to efforts by the international community to designate Hezbollah as a terror group and crackdown on its rogue activities across the region.


As the diplomatic battle continues, the United States has had little to no voice in the discussion, sources say, again citing Grenell's holdup.


Richard Goldberg, a former senior Senate aide and current senior adviser at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, described the block on Grenell as disastrous for U.S. national security and foreign policy.


"The number of bilateral issues facing the United States and Germany are mounting by the day," Goldberg said. "We need a thoughtful, strong-willed, confirmed ambassador in place as soon as possible.  On issues like trade, the Iran nuclear deal and Russia sanctions, the stakes are too high to drag this out any longer.  Leader [Mitch] McConnell should consider filing for cloture at the end of the week if the hold isn't lifted."

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27 minutes ago, 235snack said:

"The current leader of the embassy is not an ambassador," said one senior U.S. official with direct knowledge of the situation, referring to Kent Logsdon, a former Obama administration official who is serving as the chargé d'affaires ad interim in Berlin.

 

:facepalm2:       :facepalm2:       :facepalm2:

 

This guy, Kent Logsdon, really, really needs to be removed PRONTO to stop Former President Barack Obama's initiative to promote Iran's destabilizing the region and especially to stop Iran's aggression against Israel. That would ignite a powder keg if Iran attacked Israel.

 

Whatever it takes to circumvent the Democratic blockade to have Richard Grenell installed as the acting US ambassador to Germany to get the proper protocols in place to address Iran properly and provide for peace in the region to include Israel.

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President Donald Trump's pick for national security advisor signals a willingness by the administration to take a more aggressive stand against U.S. adversaries like Iran or Venezuela —and that could mean higher oil prices in the very near future.

Analysts said the appointment of John Bolton, former U.N. ambassador, makes it even more likely that the Trump administration will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal when it is up for review in May, and tensions could ramp up against the Middle Eastern country. Bolton succeeds H.R. McMaster, who resigned.

"I can't think of a more hawkish appointment than John Bolton," said Helima Croft, global head of commodity strategy at RBC. "He's a powerful advocate for a confrontational approach."

 

Croft also said the appointment leaves the question of whether Defense Secretary James Mattis looks like he's the only one representing a moderate foreign policy at this point. "Are the Iranians seeing the writing on the wall? Will they curb their activities? His appointment should put the fear of God in them, but who knows."

Bolton has advocated for pre-emptive action against both Iran and North Korea because of their nuclear programs. His first act may be to successfully encourage Trump to end the Iran nuclear deal, struck with Iran by the U.S., some members of the European Union and other countries as a way to curb its nuclear program in return for ending sanctions on the country, including its oil.

Mattis and former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had been reluctant to abandon the Iran deal, which also included China and Russia. Further financial sanctions against the country have also been discussed.

Venezuela's economic crisis is complicating matters and damaging its energy production capabilities. Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro is running for re-election despite the objections of the U.S. and other countries that the election is unfair. Venezuelan oil already is coming off the market, and could continue to decline as the country's energy infrastructure deteriorates.

"Even if it's just additional sanctions on Iran, that could hurt investment in the country and reduce flows of their oil. The market would really miss their oil this time around because of Venezuela," said John Kilduff of Again Capital. "Because of Iran's advanced ballistic missile capabilities, the other countries have offered additional sanctions to try to keep Trump in the nuclear pact."

Oil prices were higher Friday, with West Texas Intermediate futurestrading over $65, a nearly 2 percent gain. Gold, benefiting Friday from fears about trade wars, could also gain if the U.S. becomes more aggressive, not just with Iran but others like Venezuela or North Korea. Gold futures for April rose 1.5 percent Friday, to $1,347 per ounce.

Croft said May will be important for oil prices, with the Iran deal up for renewal May 12 and the Venezuela election on May 20. "If they go forward with those elections, we could see much more coercive economic policies toward Venezuela. That's when the oil market might start paying attention," she said.

"The oil market is underappreciating the importance of the personnel changes," she added. "They're underpricing the personnel changes."

Global oil demand has been improving and the pact between OPEC and Russia has helped steady prices and send them higher. Growing U.S. production from shale fields like the Permian Basin has added supply while Russia and Saudi Arabia have reduced theirs.

Kilduff said geopolitical tensions have moved prices higher recently, including anti-Iranian comments from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, who said that if Iran develops a nuclear weapon, so will Saudi Arabia.

In an interview on CBS' "60 Minutes," the prince also compared Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, to Adolph Hitler. The prince is currently in the U.S., and met with Trump earlier this week.

Saudi Arabia and Iran are engaged in a proxy war in Yemen, and are at odds on Syria, which Iran has supported.

Croft said if the U.S. drops out of the nuclear deal it could take an even harsher posture toward Iran. "The question is, are we talking about efforts to economically isolate Iran, or are we talking about efforts to change the regime?" she said. "This is where the Permian makes things different. If this had been 2010, oil would be much higher. There's a view that U.S. short cycle oil makes a difference. We could just make up for anything."

But Croft doesn't see proof that U.S. shale could make up for a shortfall in the world market.

"I haven't gotten any evidence," she said. "I don't see any signs that OPEC is going to be quick to rush in and save things." She said with the changes in Washington, it's possible there could be 200,000 to 300,000 Iranian barrels off the market by the fourth quarter, and Venezuelan production losses could total 1 million barrels. 

Bolton served in the Reagan administration, and President George W. Bush named him undersecretary of state for arms control and international security. Bush also appointed him as his representative to the U.N., which Bolton called irrelevant. Ultimately, Congress blocked his confirmation and he had to step down from that role.

"Bolton is the hawk's hawk," wrote Cliff Kupchan, chairman of Eurasia Group. He noted that besides pushing for pre-emptive strikes on North Korea's nuclear program, he has criticized the planned Trump-Kim Jong Un summit as useless.

"He's a fierce opponent of the Iran nuclear deal. In 2015, before the deal, Bolton penned an op-ed titled 'To Stop Iran's Bomb, Bomb Iran.' Bolton's appointment will likely make US policy on both hot-button issues more hardline," added Kupchan. "At least on the margins, the chance of a strike on North Korea goes up, of successful US-North Korea diplomacy goes down, and the Iran deal is in even more trouble."

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/23/bolton-likely-to-turn-up-heat-on-iran-and-boost-oil-prices.html

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Saturday 24 March

 

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Alsumaria News / Baghdad
, First Vice President of Iran Eshaq Jahangiri, on Saturday, said that the US President ,Donald Trump could not pose a threat to Iran, noting that he has to talk with the Iranian people in literature, logic and reasoning. 

"Any country can not achieve development without paying attention to its producers," Jahangiri was quoted as saying by the Fars news agency. "The leader of the revolution is very scientific and sincere, so it is necessary to change the culture of the public in this field."

 

 


Jhangere pointed out that " the United States and through Olaaebha politicized pursued behavior foolish toward the Iranian people , " asserting that "Trump can not pose a threat to us, it must talk with the Iranian people in literature, the region and inference, because the Iranians are the people of the dialogue." 

"The international atmosphere is important to us. We want to have a cultural exchange and exchange with the world and we hope that today's world will be able to communicate with us," he said.

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While the debate over President Donald Trump's threat to withdraw from Iran's nuclear deal is raging, gamers from inside and outside the US government are planning what will happen after the US leaves the agreement - a scenario that is likely to increase.
US officials and lawmakers are almost unanimous in their expectation that if no agreement is reached between the United States and European partners on changes to the Iranian nuclear deal, Trump will keep his promise to scrap US participation in the deal. The chairman of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee, Bob Crocker (Republican of Tennyson), said exactly that on March 18. President Trump's next chance will be on May 12. If he refrains from postponing the sanctions, the United States will break the agreement. Trump will probably announce America's exit from the agreement, which will generate a series of reactions and counter-reactions around the world.
State Department Planning Policy Director Brian Hawke traveled to Europe in March and met with British, French and German officials to find a "reform" of the agreement that meets Trump standards. But expectations for success remained low. If Trump decides to cancel the deal, experts say the United States needs to be prepared to mitigate the negative effects and improve the US negotiating position for months and years to come. 
"We can sign a supplementary agreement with Britain, France and Germany, but we need to plan for the possibility that we will not reach this agreement, and that is the goal of contingency planning," a senior administration official told me.
The State Department and the US National Security Council have begun to develop a diplomatic, economic and communications strategy to pull out of the agreement, reimpose sanctions and deal with possible reactions from Europe, China, Russia and Iran. This action is not intended to influence Trump's decision, officials say, but rather to give the president the choices he has made with responsible planning to support each track. 
The Trump administration set its terms for the supplementary agreement on January 12. The list includes new restrictions on Iran's ballistic missile program, more random rounds of inspections of its nuclear program, and the cancellation of the sunrise clause for ending restrictions on Iranian activities. Officials are making progress in the first two areas, but Europeans are less inclined to extend the deal.
The assumption that works here is that if negotiations with Europe succeed, Iran will accept these new restrictions reluctantly. "Iran has huge economic incentives to stay in the agreement," the administration official said. Our assessment is that they will continue the deal if the European countries and the United States reach agreement on the supplementary plan. " 
If no agreement was reached between the United States and Europe - and if Trump did not delay the sanctions under the deal - things would go further, and with enormous speed, the official said. The Treasury Department is working on fast return logistics to apply sanctions, including restoring executive orders issued during the Obama era that the deal was canceled. A ministry official told me that the ministry would be ready to implement any decision the president takes.
After that, it is not certain how the reactions of major powers will be. The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a think tank with unique influence over the Trump administration, recently held a meeting of some 50 experts on Iranian affairs and non-proliferation issues to come up with scenarios, and then compiled the results of their research into a memorandum. Half of the experts favored an "amendment" to the deal, and half preferred "nothing". 
Mark Dobowitz, chief executive of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, said he would prefer to amend the deal, but a real plan to deal with its fixation shows Europeans to be Trump Gad, making it more likely to persuade them to study a supplementary agreement. 
"The contingency planning for withdrawal options is necessary to increase the means of US pressure to negotiate a real change to the Iranian nuclear deal."
Regardless of the outcome, Trump's management should start preparing now if the president decides to withdraw from the deal, according to the memo prepared by the Defense for Democracies, which it sent to the State Department, the National Security Council and the Treasury Department. 
"Without a plan in place, the administration and our allies will be on the hunt, which will give Iran and Russia an advantage and increase the risks to the US National Security Council," the memo says.
Assuming that Mr. Trump will announce America's withdrawal from the plan, the Defense for Democracies sets out "probably" and "worst case" scenarios on a range of issues. It argues that Iran will probably remain in the agreement, encourages other states to abide by US sanctions, gradually increases its nuclear and missile activity, escalates its proxy force, and presses Americans to return to the deal. The "worst case" scenario is that Iran will reclaim its uranium enrichment program radically and escalate its regional aggression, raising tensions and the risk of a crisis.
The memo sets several possible reactions from Europeans, Russians and Chinese. Europeans are likely to go with the new sanctions as a result of economic pragmatism, the memo says, but they may choose to join Iran to resist sanctions and condemn the United States diplomatically. The memo calls for a regional readiness with the Gulf states and Israel to offer alternatives to Iranian oil and processing to counter the increased Iranian harm in the Middle East. 
The Pentagon must prepare to respond to any Iranian reactions that may target the United States or any allied forces in the region. There should also be a plan to defuse tension if Iran decides to negotiate after the United States withdraws from the deal.
The senior adviser at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Rich Goldberg, a critic of Iran's long-standing agreement, worked with Dobowitz on the memorandum. He said the preparation for the next day after the withdrawal of the United States from the agreement is the best way to prevent what the supporters of the deal warns of happening: the outbreak of war with Iran. 
"There is a vital and responsible way to deal with Iran's agreement by using an approach used by the entire government to increase pressure on Iran while containing the most likely negative responses," he said. To be effective, planning a strategy to deal with the consequences needs to be a top priority now. "
Of course, Trump could simply avoid postponing sanctions, as he did three times before, giving the negotiators more time. But Trump points out that this will not happen. So whether you like Iran's agreement or not - whether you want to modify it or cancel it - it's time to face the fact that the United States may soon back down. In this case, all stakeholders will do well if they focus on preventing the worst case scenario.

Josh Rogen

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TEHRAN A senior Iranian Revolutionary Guard source said on Saturday that tens of billions of dollars had been transferred by the leadership out of Iran in anticipation of a war by some countries to change the country's rule.

"The Revolutionary Guard has transferred tens of billions of dollars out of Iran and put them in good hands, in anticipation of the next war," the source said. 

This came days after the government and the head of the Revolutionary Guards central bank accused of buying more than $ 30 billion last month alone and taking it out of the country, leading to a historic collapse of the local currency. 

"The guards decided to take out the funds so that they could secure the cost of a full-scale war against the United States and its allies in the region if there was an attack on Iran," the source said. 

"Analysis and intelligence confirm that the administration of President Donald Trump is moving towards a direct military confrontation with Tehran whatever the latter does with regard to the nuclear agreement, even if it accepts all American conditions," he said.

"The Iranians have received information that Arab countries have pledged to pay the cost of an American war against Iran, and that Trump has made radical changes in his government and formed a war government, and the maximum opponents of the idea after receiving this pledge," he said. 

"According to information available to the Revolutionary Guard, the American plan includes a broad Israeli offensive against Hezbollah and Iran's allies in Syria and Lebanon to ensure the security of Tel Aviv first, and to deliver the allies of Washington and Riyadh to power through elections in Lebanon and Iraq, And try to coax Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to push him to abandon Iran. " 

"The Americans and the Israelis have concluded military and security agreements with some of Iran's northern neighbors, (in a possible reference to Azerbaijan), to stabilize their aircraft and troops in bases there to become closer to Tehran," he said.

He revealed that "the Revolutionary Guard is preparing to attack those bases, and issued a warning to those neighbors of the consequences of their security and military cooperation with Israel, that he would not only attack military bases." 

"The Guard is convinced that the only way to ensure Iran's security is to raise the cost of the next war for Americans and Israelis at any cost. Central Asia ". 

He pointed out that "the Guard will not spare any possession in any group that wants to fight the United States and its allies in the region and the world, even if these groups are a supporter and Al Qaeda and the Taliban."

According to the source, "there are Iranian political forces and figures believe that they can avoid war through negotiations, because the war will lead to a comprehensive economic collapse, and thus can be a security and military agreement and alliance with Russia to place Iran under Russian protection as is the case with Syria." 

He explained that "this agreement is on the table and need to sign the two sides only, especially as the Russians asked the Iranians to open military bases for them inside Iran, and on the banks of the Gulf, but the Guard rejects this scenario, because it would be like the delivery of Iran to Russia free of charge. 

This comes amidst the continued escalation against Tehran from Washington and Tel Aviv, and the growing talk of serious international and regional efforts to bring down the Iranian regime. The Revolutionary Guard, charged with protecting the regime, has begun preparing for a comprehensive war through financial action and strategic plans to confront the battle, That their chances are increasing steadily.
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LONDON - Iranian President Hassan Rowhani said on Monday that US President Donald Trump would regret if pulled out of the nuclear agreement signed by Tehran with world powers in 2015.

"Iran will not violate the nuclear agreement, but if the United States withdraws from the agreement, it will regret it," Rouhani said in a televised address. Our response will be stronger than they imagine and they will see it within a week. "

Rowhani said in a speech on the occasion of the National Day of Nuclear Technology in Tehran, "We will not be the first to violate the agreement, but they (Americans) should know that they will regret if Anthecoh".

Rowhani stressed that the nuclear industry in his country "moving with greater precision and accuracy and calculations more accurate than yesterday."

Last week Iran's Atomic Energy Organization chief Ali Akbar Salehi threatened that his country could enrich uranium by 20 percent if the United States revoked the ban.

Salehi said in a statement that if the European countries wanted to keep pace with America's policies to undermine the nuclear deal, it is a bad thing and shameful for the Europeans, according to the Fars news agency reported.

The head of the Atomic Energy Organization, the development of different scenarios for all possibilities and will work in accordance with the decisions of senior officials in the country.

Salehi was said on Thursday, saying: "We know that the enemies of them renege on his term nuclear agreement will play in response to a painful and then differ from what the prevailing circumstances, it is now completely", according to the Islamic Republic News Agency of Iran (IRNA).

US President Donald Trump has recently said he wants to go out or review the deal. The 12 May deadline was set for the re-imposition of US sanctions on Iran, possibly resulting in the end of the agreement.

It is noteworthy that the nuclear agreement with Iran was concluded in 2015 by the United States, China, Russia, France, Britain and Germany, and that it aims in its entirety to renounce the development of nuclear weapons in exchange for lifting international sanctions.

The Arabs

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14:48
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Follow - up / Tomorrow 's Press: The 

European Council decided on Thursday to extend the restrictive measures against Iran, for a whole year, because of human rights violations. 

"The measures include freezing the assets of 82 Iranian citizens and imposing a ban on granting them visas to European countries," the council said in a statement.

The measures also include banning the export of equipment that Iranian officials may use for internal repression and devices used to monitor communications. 

"The measures taken will continue until April 13, 2019." 

It should be noted that the European Council began imposing sanctions on Iran for the first time in 2011.
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Analysis 

Conflict Between Iran and Israel Will Rest on Fate of the Nuclear Deal

With Trump expected to announce if he is nixing the deal by May 12, Tehran is contending with a sluggish economy, the worst drought in 50 years and growing public discontent – making Russia ties ever more important

Zvi Bar'el
 Apr 22, 2018 2:11 PM
 
An Iranian military truck carries surface-to-air missiles past a portrait of Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran, April 18, 2018. An Iranian military truck carries surface-to-air missiles past a portrait of Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran, April 18, 2018.ATTA KENARE/AFP

Iranian President Hassan Rohani is holding a hot potato: the Iranian rial. Last week, in a desperate move, his government banned money changers from selling dollars and euros.

At Iran’s international airport, passengers traveling to “nearby” countries can buy just 500 euros ($615), while those going to “distant” countries can buy 1,000 euros. Iranians may not hold more than $10,000 or 10,000 euros, and the official exchange rate was set at 42,000 rials to the dollar – about 20,000 rials less than the black-market rate.

 

The currency has plummeted by more than 35 percent since Rohani was elected to a second term in May 2017. This isn’t exactly the good news he hoped for.

It’s no longer clear who his harshest critics are: the conservatives who seek his downfall; his reformist supporters, who are disappointed and frustrated with him after five years in office; the general public, which has seen his promises of a higher standard of living go unfulfilled; or the millions of unemployed living on welfare.

The demonstrations that began last December in cities throughout Iran still reverberate. Dozens of protesters arrested then are still awaiting trial, and others have already received heavy sentences.

That same month, workers at the Haft Tapeh sugar plant in Khuzestan Province – where some 5,500 people are employed – went on strike because they hadn’t been paid in months. Some even committed suicide because they couldn’t pay their debts.

This was not an isolated case. Strikes have occurred at dozens of factories, especially those that were privatized and sold to businessmen. The results of privatization haven’t been encouraging.

Iranians standing in front of a bank, hoping to buy U.S. dollars at the new official exchange rate announced by the government, in downtown Tehran, April 10, 2018. Iranians standing in front of a bank, hoping to buy U.S. dollars at the new official exchange rate announced by the government, in downtown Tehran, April 10, 2018.Vahid Salemi/AP

At the end of last year, the World Bank predicted that Iran’s economy would grow by 4 percent in 2018 and 2019 – about half the government’s desired pace. Industrial growth hit 18 percent during the second half of 2017, but has been just 4 percent so far this year. Production has flatlined. And the economic reforms Rohani promised to include in this year’s budget disappeared almost completely due to protests over the planned increase in prices and cuts in subsidies.

In March, farmers began demonstrating in Isfahan Province over water shortages caused by the mismanaged water economy. Even the heavens seem to be battling Rohani: This year’s drought has been the worst in half a century. The drought has also reduced the water flowing over Iran’s dams, which is expected to slash electricity production by more than 40 percent.

The regime’s woes don’t end at Rohani’s office. Demonstrators have cursed the supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and wished him dead. They have also wondered why Iran continues to finance wars in Syria and Yemen. These complaints have reached the offices of Mohammad Ali Jafari, commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, and Qassem Soleimani, commander of the Revolutionary Guards’ Quds force.In media outlets that support the regime, one can read loyalists’ responses. They have been entertaining the idea of putting a military man in as president instead of a civilian. It’s not clear whether their intent is to run such a man in the next presidential election – which is scheduled for 2021 – or to try to oust Rohani during his current term.

Iran’s political tradition has thus far been to let presidents serve out the two terms they are permitted under the constitution. But if the civic protests spiral out of control, changes at the top would be one possible solution.

However, other countries in the region have tried this method of appeasing the public, and their experience shows that the effect of such change is brief.

Under Russia’s protection

Iran is also tensely awaiting May 12 – the date by which U.S. President Donald Trump must decide whether his country is quitting the 2015 nuclear agreement with Tehran. For Iran, this decision is critical. The waiting period has already had a tangible effect, resulting in a dearth of foreign investment; a freeze on projects already agreed upon with several different countries; and heavy pressure to reduce government expenditure.

Officially, Rohani has said Iran will continue to abide by the agreement even if the United States withdraws. He has held marathon talks with European leaders, as well as the leaders of Turkey, Russia and China – and most have reportedly said they plan to defend the agreement.

Iranian President Hassan Rohani listening to explanations on new nuclear achievements at a ceremony to mark "National Nuclear Day," in Tehran, April 9, 2018. Iranian President Hassan Rohani listening to explanations on new nuclear achievements at a ceremony to mark "National Nuclear Day," in Tehran, April 9, 2018./AP

Germany, France and Britain have tried without success to persuade the European Union to impose additional sanctions on Iran – even if only symbolic ones – in order to persuade Trump to stick to the agreement. But the talks held in Brussels last week ended in failure. And if the EU and the United States don’t manage to reach an agreement by May 12, America’s unilateral withdrawal from the agreement is liable to harm not just Iran but also its business partners.

Patrick Pouyanne, CEO of the French energy giant Total, said last month his company is committed to its agreement to develop the South Pars oil field, and that he will seek an exemption from new sanctions if a decision is made to impose any. Russia and China will also continue their investments, as will many European countries. But without the U.S. banking system (which is boycotting Iran), European companies will have trouble investing in the country.

An outbreak of hostilities between Iran and Israel – something New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman and Israeli officials themselves have warned of – will apparently have to wait until at least mid-May.

Paradoxically, the battle between Washington and European capitals has seemingly contributed greatly to Iran’s restraint in the face of airstrikes on Syria attributed to Israel. Iran believes it can’t afford to start a new Mideast war, because that would play into Trump’s and Israel’s hands by releasing the European brakes.

The combination of the nuclear agreement and the economic crisis has backed Iran into a corner in which it is not only barred from developing its nuclear program, but also can’t risk a conventional war.

At most, it could return to the agreements in force prior to the nuclear deal – like the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty without the Additional Protocol, which mandated less stringent oversight than the nuclear deal did – and scrap the nuclear deal’s detailed timetables. But if it takes those steps, it is liable to clog the pipeline of cooperation with Europe and put even Russia in a difficult position.

Its domestic constraints will also force Iran to make decisions in other arenas, especially Syria. The recent exchanges of aerial and verbal blows with Israel, and the possibility that Israel will increase its attacks on Iranian targets in Syria, require Iran to accelerate the diplomatic process Russia is spearheading.

The Israeli airstrikes will actually result in closer cooperation between Iran and Russia in an effort to reach a comprehensive agreement that will consolidate Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime, demarcate both countries’ spheres of influence in Syria, set up de-escalation zones, restore control of the entire country to Assad and constrain Israel’s freedom of action in Syria.

To neutralize the danger of Israeli strikes on its bases in Syria, Iran can employ the strategy it successfully used in Iraq: embedding the militias which operate under its control into the Syrian army. In this way, it eventually forced Iraq to add the Popular Mobilization Forces to the army, which now pays the militiamen’s salaries.

Joint Syrian-Iranian army units and bases would make it harder for Israel to claim it is trying to keep Iran from consolidating its position in Syria, and every strike on a joint base would be considered a hostile act against the Assad regime.

Another way Iran could consolidate its position in Syria without hindrance is by removing parts of the Syrian population and replacing them with hundreds of thousands of Afghani and Pakistani refugees, some of whom are already fighting in Syria on Iran’s payroll and under its auspices. Both businessmen and militiamen are already buying land and houses in Syria, and are expected to be granted Syrian citizenship – which would give them the right to vote in parliamentary and presidential elections.

Any missile factories and heavy weapons plants Iran set up in Syria would also become part of Syria’s legitimate arsenal, making it difficult to distinguish between Syrian and Iranian arms.

As in Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen, regular Iranian forces wouldn’t need to be present on the ground in order to ensure the consolidation of Tehran’s influence. Under this strategy, Iran wouldn’t even need to set up a separate, pro-Iranian organization like Hezbollah in Syria. Instead, this role would be filled by the Syrian army, which would receive protection from the Kremlin against foreign attacks.

These steps, if they actually happen, could help the Iranian regime cope not only with the Israeli threat, but also with the domestic pressures it is likely to face if the United States decides to quit the nuclear deal.

Sure, the public protests against Iran’s continued participation in the wars in Syria and Yemen have been forcibly suppressed, but they haven’t completely disappeared. The regime is prepared for them to break out again.

Tehran’s need to reconcile the consolidation of its influence in Syria with assuaging public anger over the financial bloodletting the war in Syria has caused to its economy is ultimately what will determine how it acts toward Israel.

https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/iran/.premium-conflict-between-iran-and-israel-will-rest-on-fate-of-the-nuclear-deal-1.6014440

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Editorial Date: 2018/4/23 13:30 • 16 times read
Kremlin: There is no alternative to nuclear agreement with Iran
(International: Euphrates News) Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said all parties must comply with the terms of the Iranian nuclear deal, stressing that there is no alternative.
"Russia continues to abide by its position on the preservation of the validity of the so-called Iranian agreement, and we believe that there is no alternative to the agreement and that all parties must implement it," Piskov told reporters on Monday. " 
In mid-May, US President Donald Trump, The declaration, he promised, is the outcome of consultations between his country and three European countries - Britain, Germany and France - on whether Washington will remain within the framework of the comprehensive joint action plan on Iran's nuclear program or withdraw.
The agreement on Iran's nuclear program was signed on 14 July 2015 in the Austrian capital of Vienna after a series of difficult negotiations between the six international mediators 5 + 1, which together with Russia included the United States of America and the United Kingdom , France and China, as well as Germany, a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council on the one hand, and Iran on the other. 
A comprehensive joint action plan was adopted. In accordance with UN resolution 2231, to lift all previous economic and financial sanctions against Iran imposed by the United Nations, represented by the UN Security Council, by the United States of America and by the European Union.

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14:17
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Follow - up / Tomorrow Press: 

Russian President Vladimir Putin and French Emmanuel shifty two presidents agreed on Monday to continue to implement the terms of the nuclear agreement on Iran. 

The Kremlin press office said in a statement that "Russian President Vladimir Putin and French President Emmanuel Makron confirmed during a telephone conversation between them the continued implementation of the comprehensive joint action plan on Iran's nuclear program."

"It is remarkable that the presidents of Russia and France have called for the continuation of the implementation of the comprehensive joint action plan on Iran's nuclear program, which is an important factor to ensure international security." 

"The two presidents also discussed the issues of Russian-French bilateral relations, taking into consideration the upcoming visit of the French president in May to Russia." 

The phone call was made before the French president's visit to the United States, where he is expected to discuss with US President Donald Trump a number of international issues, including the fight against terrorism and Iran's nuclear program.
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19:24
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Follow-up / tomorrow Press:
 
British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said Monday that maintaining a nuclear deal with Iran is better than canceling it, adding that London shares Washington's concern about Tehran's actions in the region.

 

"Britain's position on the nuclear deal is not so different from that of its partners France and Germany," Johnson said on the sidelines of a meeting of foreign ministers of the Group of Seven (the United States, Germany, Japan, Britain, France, Italy and Canada) "He said.
A White House official said yesterday that the United States had made "significant progress" in its talks with the European "tripartite" (Britain, France and Germany) on reviewing the nuclear deal with Iran.
Trump has given European countries parties to the nuclear deal with Tehran until May 12 to "fix the enormous flaws" in this document, threatening to reject the extension of the freeze on US sanctions against Iran after that date.
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Macron lobbies Trump to keep and improve Iran nuclear deal as 'only way to bring about stability'

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1 hour ago, yota691 said:

Macron lobbies Trump to keep and improve Iran nuclear deal as 'only way to bring about stability'

:lol:This coming from the man that doesn't even know how to stop Dandruff. :lol:

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11:29
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Follow - up / Tomorrow Press: 

announced the Iranian Supreme Leader Khamenei, on Thursday, he said that the Muslim countries to stand together against America and enemies, stressing that Iran would stand in the face of attempts by American intimidation. 

Khamenei said in a speech broadcast by Iranian television that "the allies of America will not be entitled to any achievements behind the crimes in Syria," noting that "attacking Syria is a crime and that the American President and British Prime Minister and President of France are criminals."

The Iranian Supreme Leader earlier confirmed that the attack by the United States, France and Britain against Syria is a crime and will not make any gains.
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21:57
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Follow-up / tomorrow Press:
 
NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said on Thursday it was important to fully implement the Iranian nuclear deal.  
"The implementation of the nuclear agreement prevents Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons," he told a news conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels.
"The Iranian missile program, Iran's activities in the region and its threat to maritime navigation are of concern to the allies," he said. 

"The missile shield in Romania, Poland and Turkey is capable of confronting the threat of Iranian missiles," he said. 

Stoltenberg praised North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's comments on nuclear testing but rejected any lifting of international sanctions on Pyongyang without "significant change" on the part of the regime. 

"As long as we do not notice any significant changes in the behavior of the North Korean regime, international sanctions must be maintained," he said.

"The summit ahead of an upcoming summit between Kim and US President Donald Trump is the first important step toward a peaceful and negotiated solution to the crisis on the Korean Peninsula," Stoltenberg said.
 
"One of the reasons for the progress we have seen in the last few weeks is to exert strong pressure on North Korea, not least the sanctions imposed by the United Nations," he said. 

The foreign ministers of NATO countries will discuss on Friday the Syrian crisis and support for Iraq.

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 What else must we do. Or else what they threaten to blow us, isreal and Europe.  or how about pay them 200 billion dollars like Obama did

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you'd think the people of Iran would want the days of the pre-'79 revolution to return. The people should be rising up!

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Khamenei, just stated that we are an enemy and that all Islamic Nations should stand against us. okay how about we do not give them any support and disassociate ourselves from them and all Islamic countys against us. Just put their names down on a list so can make sure that we Not giving them any support whatsoever.   any of those countries part of NATO sorry cannot associate with an organization that is an enemy of the US.

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