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Israeli hints bombarded the port of Beirut and Iraq


yota691
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5 hours ago, Hotcurl said:

Yep, I could not agree more 10. This has turned into one disappointment after another, year after year after year.

I am rapidly / daily loosing my enthusiasm on this Sh**e show.

Hopefully, I am proven wrong but I'm not counting on Iraq, to do anything different in my life time.

I totally understand your disappointment and frustration. I, as well as everyone on this site feel it too. 

Truth is we can forget the 8 years when Maliki was PM; he wasn’t going to do one thing correctly for the RV to happen and we can forget the years that ISIS was in control of 1/3 of the country. So, about 11 years totally wasted. I didn’t see any real progress of getting  items done to facilitate the RV until the IMF and World Bank stepped in and Abadi became PM. 

Shoot, when I bought my first Dinar in March, 2010, I was so “lucky” that my certified check arrived at Dinar Trade before the RV!! 

I have felt for the past several months that it will be at least 2020 before we see the RV. I just don’t see things being accomplished sooner than that. I will be delighted to be wrong and would love for it to happen tomorrow. 

Even though I totally believe the Iraqi Dinar will RV one day, I don’t think anyone has any idea as to when. 

Frustrating??  You dang right because I need it and want it before I die or get too darn old to enjoy it. But no guarantee I will get what I want and need. 😏😬

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Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations in Iraq visits Nineveh

 
Mosul / Shorouk Maher 
 
 
Nineveh Provincial Council announced the arrival of the UN Secretary-General in Jenin, Janine Haines, to the city of Mosul at the head of a delegation from UNAMI, while the University of Mosul, the reconstruction of new sections after the bombing by the gangs of terror. 
"The visit included a field tour in the old Mosul with the delegation to see the extent of the damage caused by the terrorist gangs," the deputy governor of Nineveh province, Hassan al-Alaf, told Al-Sabah. "The Mosul will witness great reconstruction with the restoration of the infrastructure and the return of displaced people. Back to her. " On the other hand, revealed the University of Mosul, the reconstruction of new sections after the bombing by the gangs of the terrorist. "The engineering and technical staff of the University of Mosul, in cooperation with the municipality of Mosul, has completed the construction of new sections on the campus in different faculties, including the Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering," said the official of the reconstruction project of these sections Jafar Ali. Engineering has begun to rebuild 5 new laboratories belonging to the faculties of science and pharmacy within the university «. 
In addition, life has returned to the oldest market in the old city of Mosul, and work has been fully resumed by shop owners. 
"More than 600 shops have been brought back to work inside the Sargakhana market with the garage, restaurants and cafeterias in the same market, after the absence of three years in the wake of the bombing by terrorist gangs during the liberation operations," said the deputy mayor of Mosul, Zuhair al-Araji. »The engineering cadres in the municipal and municipal administrations of Mosul reconstructed these shops from the amounts of reconstruction of infrastructure to restore life to old Mosul again». 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Iran and the United Nations as prime minister to discuss mine files, economy and future activities

images-2.jpe

BAGHDAD, Feb. 6 (Xinhua) - Prime Minister Adel Abdulmahdi discussed with the representative of the UN Secretary-General in Iraq and the head of the Iraq Assistance Mission (UNAMI), Jenin Hennes Scheart   , the cooperation of the United Nations Mission in Iraq International security and demining operations in Mosul, as well as the most important future programs and activities of the International Mission.

https://www.iraqpressagency.com/ايران-والامم-المتحدة-في-رئاسة-الوزراء/

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  • yota691 changed the title to UN Security Council to hold special session in Iraq
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The UN Security Council will hold a special session on Wednesday to discuss the situation in Iraq.

The UN mission in Iraq (UNAMI), in a statement; that the Security Council will hold a meeting on the situation in Iraq, on Wednesday.

The briefing will be on developments in Iraq and the work of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan's Special Representative for Iraq Janine Henness Blachkart will brief shortly after the start of the meeting.

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image.php?token=9f789af3e3274721c8098e10a30ad381&size=

 


Today, the Security Council holds a special session on the situation in Iraq

12-02-2019 02:33 PM 
Number of readings: 58

 

 

Agency of the orbit - BAGHDAD 
- The United Nations Security Council is to hold a special session on Wednesday to discuss the situation in Iraq.
The session will be held at 10:00 am New York time (6:00 pm Baghdad time). 
A statement from the United Nations Mission in Iraq (UNAMI), which was seen by the 'orbit', said 'it is expected that the Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations in Iraq, Jenin Henness - Plashkart, briefing shortly after the start of the meeting'. 
"The Special Representative will brief on the developments in Iraq and the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI)," the statement said.

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59 minutes ago, Half Crazy Runner said:

Is the UN Security Council responsible for releasing Iraq from the sanctions that keep their dinar restricted from being traded internationally...?

 

:backflip:       :backflip:       :backflip:

 

YOU GO, GIRL, Half Crazy Runner, AND The Very Best Of Your Week To You!!! :tiphat:

 

Now THAT is a Most Excellent AND Keen Assessment!!!

 

:bravo:       :bravo:       :bravo:

 

:crossedfingers:   :crossedfingers:   :crossedfingers:

 

:undocumented:       :undocumented:       :undocumented:

 

Go Moola Nova (YEAH AND YEE HAW, BABY, READY WHEN YOU ARE BROTHER (OR SISTER) - LET ‘ER BUCK!!!)!!!

:rodeo:   :pirateship:

 

P.S. I topped out on my stinkin’ purple trophy AND emerald counter so, for now, please accept +++++++++++++++++++++

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11 FEBRUARY 2019
8460TH MEETING (AM)

ISIL/Da’esh Continues Evolution into Covert Global Network Enjoying Access to Millions of Dollars, Top Anti-Terrorism Official Tells Security Council

Counter-Terrorism Directorate Chief Concerned That Group Exploits Mobile Money Payments, Anonymity of Blockchain Technology

Despite the decline in the number of international terrorist attacks in 2018, Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) continues to evolve into a global covert network, with access to hundreds of millions of dollars and the demonstrated ability to exploit new technologies, the top-ranking United Nations counter-terrorism officials told the Security Council today.

Vladimir Voronkov, Under-Secretary-General in the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism, briefed the 15-member Council on the eighth “Report of the Secretary-General on the threat posed by ISIL to international peace and security and on the range of the United Nations’ efforts in support of Member States in countering the threat”.  He said the threat has been increased by the presence of returning, relocating or released foreign terrorist fighters.

With ISIL’s centre of gravity in Iraq and Syria, where it is reported to control between 14,000 and 18,000 militants, the group remains intent on undermining any form of stabilization, he emphasized.  Despite its loss of revenues, ISIL sustains its operations through accessible reserves or investment in businesses ranging from $50 million to $300 million.  “Recent ISIL losses should not lead to complacency at any level,” he stressed.

He went on to outline efforts undertaken by the United Nations in countering the financing of terrorism, border control enforcement and countering terrorist narratives.  Noting that ISIL continues to target Libya’s police stations and oil facilities, he said approximately 1,000 foreign terrorist fighters are also reported to have travelled from the western Balkans to conflict zones in Iraq and Syria.  ISIL is also reported to control training camps in Afghanistan and is increasingly recruiting women and youngsters in its South-East Asia terrorist operations.

In a second briefing, Michèle Coninsx, Executive Director of the Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, cited with concern ISIL’s use of mobile payment services in West Africa and its possible exploitation of the anonymity afforded by blockchain technology.  On advancing justice and accountability, she emphasized the fundamental need to collect and preserve evidence, pointing out that Governments can also establish special investigative and prosecutorial entities to support criminal justice efforts, welcoming the establishment of the United Nations Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da‘esh/Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (UNITAD) in that context.

She went on to state that the Directorate continues its extensive work with the Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee in adopting the Addendum to the Madrid Guiding Principles in order to help Governments reduce the flow of foreign terrorist fighters.  The Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate will also intensify efforts to develop, with Member States, comprehensive responses to terrorism, she said, noting that Governments in the Lake Chad Basin area are developing strategies to prosecute, rehabilitate and reintegrate persons associated with Boko Haram, with strategic support from the Directorate.

In the ensuing discussion, delegates noted that, despite progress in the fight against ISIL, countries must remain vigilant against the group’s increasingly covert nature, continue working together to bring terrorists to justice, implement policies that support rehabilitation and reintegration, curb use of the Internet to spread terrorist propaganda used to radicalize and recruit, and include civil society, women and young people in all such processes.

The representative of the United States said that, while the global coalition has significantly degraded ISIL’s finances, the group continues to evolve.  Noting the steps taken by the Government of the United States to prevent travel by foreign terrorist fighters, he called upon the United Nations to continue to guide Member States on comprehensive prosecution of such fighters.  “We cannot relent in this fight,” he stressed.

Peru’s representative warned that “the possibility of resurgence cannot be discounted”, reiterating the importance of financial intelligence units and monitoring flows of cash, the vehicle through which terrorists mobilize resources.  He stressed the need to deepen knowledge of the connections linking money‑laundering, trafficking in weapons and human beings, and the financing of terrorism.

The Russian Federation’s representative described any economic relations with individuals or organizations involved in ISIL activities as a gross violation of relevant Security Council resolutions.  He went on to cite kidnappings, as well as trade in agricultural products, human organs and cultural items, as ISIL’s main sources of income.  He also called attention to terrorist groups that pass themselves off as opposition movements in order to receive weapons.

Indonesia’s delegate said that, with the defeat of ISIL/Da’esh in Syria, the group’s propaganda, radicalization and recruitment have shifted to South-East Asia, where there is an alarming trend of recruiting and radicalizing women and children.  A holistic approach to fighting terrorism is needed at every stage, he reiterated, stressing the importance of “soft measures” to steer people away from extremism, including by giving voice to moderation.

Also speaking today were representatives of Poland, China, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Kuwait, South Africa, Côte d’Ivoire, Belgium, Dominican Republic and Equatorial Guinea.

The meeting began at 10:04 a.m. and ended at 12:07 p.m.

Briefings

VLADIMIR VORONKOV, Under-Secretary-General, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism, briefed Council members on the eighth “Report of the Secretary-General on the threat posed by ISIL [Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant/Da’esh] to international peace and security and on the range of the United Nations efforts in support of Member States in countering the threat”.  The report highlights the continuing threat of ISIL as a global organization with centralized leadership, despite the decline in the number of international attacks during 2018.  He said the threat is increased by returning, relocating or released foreign terrorist fighters, adding that the report illustrates continuing United Nations support for national efforts to address it.

With its centre of gravity in Iraq and Syria, where it is reported to control between 14,000 and 18,000 militants, ISIL continues to evolve into a covert network with the intent to undermine any form of stabilization, he emphasized.  Despite the more concealed or locally embedded activities of ISIL cells, its central leadership retains influence and maintains the intent to generate internationally directed attacks.  This is exacerbated by the challenge of foreign terrorist fighters either leaving conflict zones or about to be released from prison.  Radicalization in prison is a particular challenge in Europe and Iraq, he stressed.

In terms of ISIL’s financial strength, he cited the report as noting that, despite loss of revenue, the group can sustain its operations through accessible reserves or investment in businesses, ranging from $50 million to $300 million.  The group’s residual threat in Iraq is reported to emanate both from local remnants of the group and from fighters crossing the border from Syria.  In Africa, the report highlights the threat that ISIL poses in Libya, where it has targeted police stations and oil facilities.  In Europe, approximately 1,000 foreign terrorist fighters are reported to have travelled from the western Balkans to conflict zones in Iraq and Syria, he said, adding that ISIL is also reported to control some training camps in Afghanistan.  The report also cites the increasing role of women and young people in terrorist operations in South-East Asia.

He said the report also outlines the work undertaken by relevant United Nations agencies and offices, he said, including the Office of Counter-Terrorism, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), in countering the financing of terrorism, border enforcement and countering terrorist narratives.  The Secretary-General has encouraged the Office of Counter-Terrorism to provide a forum in which expertise can be shared, he said, underlining the particular importance of that aspect in addressing the flow of foreign terrorist fighters, including returnees.  The Office is working to implement various counter-terrorism instruments and organizing thematic regional events on countering and preventing terrorism, he said, stressing:  “Recent ISIL losses should not lead to complacency at any level.”

MICHÈLE CONINSX, Executive Director, Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, said that, despite the dwindling control of ISIL over territories that once provided it with unprecedented resources and a base for launching attacks, complex challenges remain.  The dramatic change in the group’s circumstances has driven it into a covert, more locally focused network in Iraq, Syria and elsewhere.  ISIL has nonetheless retained its global networks and is today one of the international terrorist groups most likely to carry out a large‑scale attack, she said, adding that its plans to fuel sectarian tensions are an ongoing concern.

Highlighting three challenges, she said the destructive legacy of ISIL/Da’esh in Iraq and Syria is manifested in the millions of displaced persons living in dire conditions inside camps.  “Rebuilding structures and restoring and reconciling communities — including through a comprehensive criminal justice system — is a long-term investment” that can only succeed through the continued involvement of local, national, regional and international actors, she said.  For States to advance justice and accountability, the collection, preservation and use of evidence is fundamental, she emphasized, adding that, where criminal justice officials are unable to operate in high-risk conditions, the military can play a critical role.  Governments can also establish special investigative and prosecutorial bodies to support criminal justice efforts, she noted, welcoming the establishment of the United Nations Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da‘esh/Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (UNITAD) in that context.

Another challenge has been the increasing number of suspected terrorists, including returning and relocating foreign terrorist fighters and their family members in custody, she said.  It is vital that States monitor, evaluate and review the effectiveness of their prosecution, rehabilitation and reintegration programmes.  Effective regulation, review and oversight of those strategies must include protection of human rights, with prosecutions taking rehabilitation and reintegration goals into consideration.  Pointing out that terrorist groups have consistently demonstrated their ability to exploit new technologies and circumvent obstacles to their financial, technical and recruitment capabilities, she cited their use of mobile payment services in West Africa, and more broadly, concerns over their possible exploitation of the anonymity afforded by blockchain technology.

She went on to detail ISIL’s use of improvised explosive devices, access to know-how and ability to obtain precursor materials, emphasizing that the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate — through a global initiative undertaken in partnership with UNODC and the International Association for Prosecutors — will continue to support State efforts by facilitating technical assistance and enhancing cooperation with the private sector.  She also highlighted the Directorate’s extensive work with the Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee in adopting the Addendum to the Madrid Guiding Principles to help Governments reduce the flow of foreign terrorist fighters.  The Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate will also intensify efforts to develop, with Member States, comprehensive responses to terrorism, she said, noting that Governments in the Lake Chad Basin area are developing strategies to prosecute, rehabilitate and reintegrate persons associated with Boko Haram, with strategic support from the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate and technical expertise from UNODC.

Statements

JONATHAN R. COHEN (United States) said the latest report demonstrates the progress made in the fight against ISIL, notably in Iraq, Syria and the Philippines.  The global coalition has significantly degraded ISIL’s finances while helping to clear neighbourhoods of mines and restoring basic services.  The United States continues to provide humanitarian relief to the Syrian people, he said, noting that the United States is the largest provider of aid to that country.  However, ISIL continues to evolve and plan its attacks, he said, adding that, to address this, the United States has made efforts to prevent the travel of foreign terrorist fighters.  Calling upon the United Nations to continue to guide Member States on comprehensive prosecution of terrorist fighters, he said the Organization must continue to include civil society in such efforts while also integrating a gender perspective.  “We cannot relent in this fight,” he stressed, pledging to continue to work with partners to degrade and ultimately eliminate ISIL.

GUSTAVO MEZA-CUADRA (Peru) emphasized that the fight against ISIL cannot be considered to have ended, warning that “the possibility of resurgence cannot be discounted”.  The return of foreign fighters poses a serious threat, he added, calling for adequate policies that support rehabilitation and reintegration.  National criminal justice systems must play a key role in that process, particularly in order to prevent prisons becoming centres of radicalization and recruitment.  The financing of terrorism is of concern, he said, reiterating the importance of financial intelligence units and the need to monitor cash, the vehicle through which terrorists mobilize resources.  It is crucial to deepen knowledge of the connections linking money‑laundering, the trafficking in weapons and human beings, and the financing of terrorism, he said, stressing also the importance of prosecuting individuals involved in terrorist activities.  Peru regrets the fact that no member of ISIL has been put on trial for sexual crimes, he added.

MARIUSZ LEWICKI (Poland) said that, although numbers from the report show that ISIL-controlled areas in Iraq and Syria have decreased, “we must not lower our guard”.  Efforts to stop the creation and expansion of Da’esh and affiliated cells in Central and South-East Asia, Libya, Afghanistan and West Africa must continue, he emphasized, calling upon Member States to step up efforts to prevent and counter the financing of terrorism.  Terrorists’ sophisticated adaptation strategies are forcing the international community to adjust legal and operational frameworks, he said, underlining that need to enhance the transparency of financial flows, the sharing of information and ensure cooperation with the private sector.  Member States should strengthen efforts to freeze the assets of all individuals and entities on the Da’esh and Al-Qaida Sanctions List, he said, adding that women and children associated with foreign terrorist fighters returning and relocating from conflict zones may require special assistance.  He went on to encourage Member States to use the adopted Addendum to the Madrid Guiding Principles to ensure legal protections for children, and urged Member States to ensure that terrorist fighters are brought to justice.

VASSILY A. NEBENZIA (Russian Federation) described any economic relations with individuals or organizations involved in ISIL activities as a gross violation of relevant Security Council resolutions, emphasizing that all such decisions have been made, and must be implemented, in good faith.  The Middle East remains a stronghold of the ISIL/Da’esh leadership, which seeks to cooperate with “brothers in arms”.  He welcomed the stabilization of the military and political situations in Iraq and Syria and stressed the importance of cutting off financing for terrorism.  As part of the Coordination Centre in Baghdad, the Russian Federation has helped to normalize the situation in Iraq, he said.  However, he expressed concern over the repatriation of foreign terrorist fighters working with ISIL/Da’esh, emphasizing that the Council should invite representatives of Member States suffering terrorism, notably Syria and Iraq to appear before it.

A wing of ISIL/Da’esh is destabilizing the situation in Afghanistan, he continued, adding that its practice of recruiting through information and communication technology poses an additional threat.  ISIL/Da’esh activities in Afghanistan are fed by foreign terrorist fighters trained in Iraq and Syria, while the high number of suicide-bomber attacks demonstrates the group’s considerable human resources.  While its income from contraband fuel continues to fall, ISIL seized resources from Syria’s Deir ez-Zor Province, he said, noting that key income sources for the largest terrorist groups have not changed significantly since the Secretary-General’s previous report.

He went on to cite kidnappings, as well as trade in agricultural products, human organs and cultural items, as ISIL’s main sources of income.  They also fill their coffers from the sale of sulphuric acid and cement, as well as income from cryptocurrencies, Internet scams and fake medicines.  In linking with organized crime, ISIL/Da’esh seeks to control drug trafficking channels and illicitly trade in iron, copper, gold and semi-precious stones illegally mined in Afghanistan, he said, noting that, despite repeated calls, the United Nations does not focus on cutting off financing from military-related goods.  He also called attention to terrorist groups that pass themselves off as opposition movements in order to receive weapons.  The Russian Federation supports efforts to criminalize illegal arms brokerage, better exchange of information, and monitoring of weapons, he said.

WU HAITAO (China) urged the global community to embrace the “shared future for mankind” approach to terrorism, responding collectively to threats by seeking consensus.  All countries should adopt a zero-tolerance policy towards terrorism, aligning their efforts with the United Nations Charter and the principles of sovereignty and ownership, while complementing Council resolutions and the Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.  The global community should also seek to eliminate the causes of terrorism by helping States achieve socioeconomic development and settle hotspot issues through diplomatic means.  He went on to stress that terrorism must not be associated with any one country or religion, adding that States must also take seriously the threat posed by foreign terrorist fighters and stop organizations from abusing the Internet.  support must be provided to help States implement the Madrid Principles, strengthen border management and share intelligence resources, he said, adding that greater cooperation is also needed to combat terrorism financing and the spread of extremist ideologies.  The Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate and the Counter-Terrorism Committee should be given full play in assessing terrorist threats and enhancing sanctions, he said.  Emphasizing China’s rejection of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, he said the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement has carried out attacks in his country and should be part of the counter-terrorism focus.

JONATHAN GUY ALLEN (United Kingdom) said ISIL/Da’esh is still the most significant threat to his country and remains a priority.  It also remains a threat to global peace and security, continuing to inspire others to do great harm.  He echoed the Russian Federation’s representative in emphasizing the need to cut terrorists off from financing, stressing also that the return of foreign terrorist fighters and frustrated individuals with little centralized direction requires all States to work on prevention and tailor their efforts to the evolving threat.  Noting that the United Kingdom has invited the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate to conduct an assessment of its national efforts, he said that a new counter-terrorism and border security bill aims to ensure that law enforcement and intelligence agencies have the tools they need to keep the country safe from terrorism.  There are growing concerns over groups subscribing to extreme right-wing ideologies, he said, stressing that National Action’s glorification of violence “has absolutely no place in a Britain that works for everyone”.  The United Kingdom is also ramping up efforts to respond to drone threats, he added.  Describing women as both victims of terrorism and key partners in preventing and responding to violence, he said they are notably on the front lines in building rehabilitation and reconciliation.  The Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate must identify gaps in capacity, working with civil society, the private sector and others to take advantage of their respective expertise, he said, emphasizing that there must be no confusion over mandates.

FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France) said that, despite the fact that Da’esh has lost much of its territory, it still poses a major threat, having transformed into an underground network.  Its propaganda continues to draw in a number of sympathizers, he noted, emphasizing:  “It is essential that the action of the international coalition against Da’esh continues.”  Impunity for ISIL’s crimes is not an option, he said, reminding the Council of its “political and moral responsibility”.  France welcomes the continuing work of the Council’s monitoring team, which will produce evidence for the prosecution of terrorists who committed crimes in Iraq, he said.  France prioritizes fighting the financing of terrorism, he said, emphasizing the desperate need to share intelligence, fight anonymous transactions and support vulnerable countries.  Close coordination, including among the civil, military, intelligence and judicial sectors, is also essential, he said, also stressing the importance of providing support for children.  France continues to curb use of the Internet to spread terrorist propaganda used to radicalize and recruit, he added.

JUERGEN SCHULZ (Germany) described the threat posed by ISIL/Da’esh as “imminent and very substantial”, while nevertheless emphasizing the need to address the adverse and unintended impacts of sanctions and counter-terrorism measures on the delivery humanitarian aid.  As the situations in northern Iraq and in Syria demonstrate, vigilant efforts must be made to resolve conflicts before they descend into violence, he said, stressing:  “Terrorists need to be vigorously pursued and persecuted.”  A holistic approach is important for long-term success, he added.  To address the challenges posed by returning foreign terrorist fighters, a broad approach involving criminal justice and police measures is essential, as are de-radicalization and reintegration efforts, as well as combating radicalization in prisons.  Law enforcement and border control personnel must have the tools they need to do their jobs, notably electronically accessible terrorist watch lists, he said.  Welcoming France’s initiative to submit a draft resolution on combating terrorist financing, he expressed support for the Financial Action Task Force as the global standard setter for anti‑money‑laundering actions.  Creating jobs and environments in which young people can support families is vital, as is ensuring that respect for human rights and the rule of law do not “play second fiddle” in the fight against terrorism, he said.

MANSOUR AYYAD SH. A. ALOTAIBI (Kuwait) said that the number and scale of terrorist attacks carried out by ISIL has recently declined, but the group continues to pose a real and direct threat.  “We have to take into account the great number of militants that are returning and relocating,” he added.  The most prominent threat is ISIL’s ability to organize and finance its terrorist activities through financial assets estimated at between $50 million and $300 million, he said, adding that this requires international and national preventive measures such as comprehensive strategies to fight the financing of terrorism and terrorist narratives.  He went on to stress the need to reassess the situation of relocating fighters, reaffirming the need to hold perpetrators accountable, including those who have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity.  At the international level, he continued, exchanging information, addressing the root causes of terrorism, preventing terrorism incitement, training law enforcement officers, taking care of young people and signing bilateral agreements are vital.

JERRY MATTHEWS MATJILA (South Africa) said the United Nations remains key in the coordination of international efforts against terrorism.  South Africa has always supported a holistic approach to countering the threat, he added, emphasizing that terrorism should be addressed in its totality rather that in parts.  Security measures alone will not successfully counter the threat, he noted, expressing support for a “whole-of-Government and whole-of-society approach” that also addresses the role of women and children, youth, civil society as well as the private sector and the wider community.  The Madrid Principles and its Addendum are essential, he said, while underlining that anti-ISIL measures must be in compliance with obligations under international law.  He expressed particular concern over terrorist groups in sub-Saharan in Africa.

GBOLIÉ DESIRÉ WULFRAN IPO (Côte d’Ivoire) said that Da’esh remains a threat to international peace and security with strong financing and several thousand combatants in the Middle East, Asia and Africa.  Expressing concern over its movements and the return of its members to their home countries, he stressed the need to address the role of prisons in radicalization.  The fight against terrorism requires a holistic global approach, he continued, emphasizing the need for greater efforts to implement international commitments on monitoring and for criminal prosecution of terrorist acts, notably by updating legislation to ensure that criminal justice is effective.  States should also improve coordination among the services tasked with detecting and addressing terrorism, and in curtailing the flow of foreign terrorist fighters, he emphasized, adding that it is also essential to reinforce air safety and sharing information on passenger lists .  Joint efforts should focus on cutting off financing for Da’esh and its affiliates, while appropriate cooperation methods should be established for sharing information, ensuring cooperation between the public and private sectors and bolstering legislative frameworks.  States must be supported in devising strategies for adapting to and fighting violent extremism, he stressed.

MARC PECSTEEN DE BUYTSWERVE (Belgium) said the Council has the wherewithal, through the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate and the monitoring team, to carry out an independent analysis of the threat posed by Da’esh, a group that continues to draw in recruits, including in Europe.  Expressing concern over the return from Syria of foreign terrorist fighters and their families, he touched on the logistic and legal difficulties of finding and securing people in temporary camps and those at large.  Belgium has taken a holistic approach to fighting terrorism at home, which also applies to foreign terrorist fighters returning to the country, he said.  In parallel, it recognizes its international humanitarian obligations and respects human rights, including the rights of the child.  Belgium is especially focused on rehabilitating the children of foreign terrorist fighters under 10 years of age and providing them with tailored assistance upon their return.  Recalling that the Addendum to the Madrid Principles guides Member States in implementing resolution 2396 (2017), proposing a balanced approach to counter‑terrorism that stresses the importance of prevention, he said its implementation should be a priority.  He went on to express support for France’s proposed draft resolution on terrorist and for the efforts by the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism for Syria.  However, while there is documentation of sexual violence committed by Da’esh, such crimes have not been prosecuted, he pointed out, stressing the need to reinforce deterrents, such as sanctions.

JOSÉ MANUEL TRULLOLS (Dominican Republic) said the Council must continue to focus on the threat posed by ISIL/Da’esh because its transformation into a covert global network requires evolving policies evolve and deeper cooperation among States.  Its ability to take advantage of areas under weak governance should spur reflection on the causes of radicalization and extremism, particularly among young people and women.  The fact that 10 per cent of the 40,000 people travelling to join ISIL are minors, and that 20 per cent are women and girls, lays bare the need to focus on prevention, he said adding that the stories emerging from interviews with women fleeing ISIL demonstrate the degree to which coercion is used to force them to join.  “We must develop strategies for prosecution, reintegration and rehabilitation,” especially for their dependents, he said.  There must also be greater trust in the exchange of information among agencies, recognizing that the threat is common, grave and imminent.  It is vital to ensure implementation of agreements and protocols supporting cooperation, with such efforts going hand in hand with training, he added.

DIAN TRIANSYAH DJANI (Indonesia) said that, with the defeat of ISIL/Da’esh in Syria, its propaganda, radicalization and recruitment has shifted to South-East Asia, where there is an alarming trend of recruiting and radicalizing women and children, especially those from educated and middle-class backgrounds.  Also, a growing number of frustrated travellers unable to enter the battlefield in Syria are being re-directed by ISIL/Da’esh, with some becoming suicide bombers in efforts to attract the attention of the group’s leaders, he noted.  Terrorist planning and logistics, meanwhile, are shifting towards high-tech cyberactivities, including online fraud and fundraising through social media, he said.  “Given the nature of the challenge, we need to be not only decisive in our policies, but also innovative and practical in our approach,” he said, emphasizing the need for the pace of cooperation to match “a wily opponent that is quick to evolve”.  A holistic approach is needed at every stage, he reiterated, stressing the importance of cooperation in exchanging information, combating the financing of terrorism and improving border security.  There is also need for “soft measures” to steer people away from extremism, including by giving voice to moderation as the best way to confront hatred.  The causes of terrorism — unresolved conflict, poverty and injustice, among them — must be addressed, he stressed.

ANATOLIO NDONG MBA (Equatorial Guinea), Council President for February, spoke in his national capacity, saying that terrorism remains one of the most serious problems of modern times.  Cautioning that no single country can deal with the threat alone, he noted that, although the world suffered less from ISIL attacks in 2018, the group remains the world’s most serious and dangerous.  Equatorial Guinea has been following with deep concern the phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters, he said, emphasizing the importance of implementing the Addendum to the Madrid Guiding Principles.  States must engage with vulnerable countries and help them implement the Guidelines, he added.  Welcoming the work of the United Nations team investigating ISIL’s crimes, he emphasized the need to defeat impunity.  Pointing out that Da’esh is present in North Africa and in the Sahel, he underlined the need to identify and neutralize this threat, adding that efforts to prevent terrorist attacks must go hand in hand with investment in sustainable development.

For information media. Not an official record.
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1 hour ago, Half Crazy Runner said:

Is the UN Security Council responsible for releasing Iraq from the sanctions that keep their dinar restricted from being traded internationally...?

 

Iraq is under Chapter VI under the guidance of the UN Security Council which was set in place to handle peaceful disputes while still fufilling the origonal sanctions places on them under Chapter VII.  Iraq is solely responsible for chosing to take their currency international.  Iraq presently choses to reside under article XIV under the IMF which allows them debt protection.  Once Iraq pays it's debts (Kuwait, Paris Club, Arab Nation Debt), then they may be more likely to chose a move from IMF article XIV to article VIII giving them an internationally traded currency.  This is why they will always need the auctions for trade relying on the dollar as their hard currency, while wasting their reserves to maintain their peg to the dollar.

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1 hour ago, Synopsis said:

 

:backflip:       :backflip:       :backflip:

 

YOU GO, GIRL, Half Crazy Runner, AND The Very Best Of Your Week To You!!! :tiphat:

 

Now THAT is a Most Excellent AND Keen Assessment!!!

 

:bravo:       :bravo:       :bravo:

 

:crossedfingers:   :crossedfingers:   :crossedfingers:

 

:undocumented:       :undocumented:       :undocumented:

 

Go Moola Nova (YEAH AND YEE HAW, BABY, READY WHEN YOU ARE BROTHER (OR SISTER) - LET ‘ER BUCK!!!)!!!

:rodeo:   :pirateship:

 

P.S. I topped out on my stinkin’ purple trophy AND emerald counter so, for now, please accept +++++++++++++++++++++

 

1 hour ago, Butifldrm said:

 

Iraq is under Chapter VI under the guidance of the UN Security Council which was set in place to handle peaceful disputes while still fufilling the origonal sanctions places on them under Chapter VII.  Iraq is solely responsible for chosing to take their currency international.  Iraq presently choses to reside under article XIV under the IMF which allows them debt protection.  Once Iraq pays it's debts (Kuwait, Paris Club, Arab Nation Debt), then they may be more likely to chose a move from IMF article XIV to article VIII giving them an internationally traded currency.  This is why they will always need the auctions for trade relying on the dollar as their hard currency, while wasting their reserves to maintain their peg to the dollar.

 

Thank you both Synopsis & Butifldrm! 👍🏻

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127474.jpg?width=750&&height=375

 
2019/02/13 08:41
  • Number of readings 33
  • Section: Iraq
  •  
  •  

Security Council to hold special session on the situation in Iraq

 

BAGHDAD / The obelisk: The United Nations Security Council of the United Nations, Wednesday, February 13, 2019, a session on Iraq at 6 pm Baghdad time.

UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan's special representative for Iraq, Genin Hennes, is expected to brief on developments in Iraq and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq in her first briefing after taking office in December.

A statement by the United Nations Mission in Iraq (UNAMI) said that Special Representative Jenin Hennes would brief on developments in Iraq and the United Nations Assistance Mission.

The council will also discuss a report of the Secretary-General in advance to the Security Council.

Follow the obelisk

http://almasalah.com/ar/news/163752/مجلس-الامن-يعقد-جلسة-خاصة-حول-الاوضاع-في-العراق

 
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17 hours ago, Butifldrm said:

Iraq is under Chapter VI under the guidance of the UN Security Council which was set in place to handle peaceful disputes while still fufilling the origonal sanctions places on them under Chapter VII.  Iraq is solely responsible for chosing to take their currency international.  Iraq presently choses to reside under article XIV under the IMF which allows them debt protection.  Once Iraq pays it's debts (Kuwait, Paris Club, Arab Nation Debt), then they may be more likely to chose a move from IMF article XIV to article VIII giving them an internationally traded currency. 

Thanks Butifldrm, very nice summary. 

I thought I read a short while back that the Paris club had forgiven the debt. Anyone else remember that? If so, could be a step closer. 

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3 hours ago, yogaman said:

Thanks Butifldrm, very nice summary. 

I thought I read a short while back that the Paris club had forgiven the debt. Anyone else remember that? If so, could be a step closer. 

 

yup i have read off and on throughout the years the paris club forgave much of the debt and that kuwait worked a deal for the remainder of owed to them and ect. with other countries in articles most just want a piece of the reconstruction action that is still yet to begin in a large scale way the trouble with all this we never really know anything until its past tense one just cant get bogged down with any of it i simply watch and follow along and live life ... cheers dv

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4 hours ago, yogaman said:

Thanks Butifldrm, very nice summary. 

I thought I read a short while back that the Paris club had forgiven the debt. Anyone else remember that? If so, could be a step closer. 

 

Thanks you yogaman🙂.  The Paris Club has forgiven around 80% of Iraq’s debt.  

http://articles.latimes.com/2004/nov/22/world/fg-debt22

 

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Editorial date:: 2019/2/13 23:22  54 times read
UNICEF Representative: Iraqi children suffer from violence even in safe places
{International: Al Furat News} The United Nations published a statement from UNICEF Representative in Iraq, Peter Hawkins, on the occasion of Valentine's Day the media link, via the Twitter social networking site,
"Iraqi children deserve love, not violence, and no one deserves to show more love to them than children," Hawkins said in his statement. 
"To show love to a child means to cherish it and protect it from violence," he said. "Here in Iraq, children are exposed to unimaginable levels of violence over years of ongoing conflict and insecurity." 
"According to the results of the Multi-Indicator Cluster Survey of 2018, more than 80 percent of all children in Iraq have been subjected to severe corporal punishment, including slapping on the face, head or ears, and frequent and repeated beatings."
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  • yota691 changed the title to (UN Security Council) With Government Formation incomplete, Political Actors in Iraq Must End Infighting, Fulfil Populace’s Immediate Needs, Special Representative Tells Security Council​​​​​​​
SC/13700
13 FEBRUARY 2019
8462ND MEETING (AM)

With Government Formation incomplete, Political Actors in Iraq Must End Infighting, Fulfil Populace’s Immediate Needs, Special Representative Tells Security Council

With the formation of the Government of Iraq still incomplete, it is high-time for leaders to shift the focus from factional politics and invest in addressing the immediate needs of the citizens, the highest-ranking United Nations official in the country said today as she briefed the Security Council.  

Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq and Head of United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), called on political actors to overcome infighting and allow compromise to prevail in the interest of the Iraqi people.  Four ministerial positions remain vacant, three of which are subject to fierce disagreements among political blocs.  She also added that there are experienced Iraqi women well-qualified for jobs in government.   

Noting some positive developments, including the 2019 budget allocations for the electricity sector, she said such a move reflects the Government’s efforts to improve basic service delivery.  However, funding for reconstruction in liberated areas is far less available than what is needed.  State finances are strongly reliant on oil sector revenues, which are vulnerable to fluctuations in oil prices.  Corruption also remains vast and fighting it is not easy. 

Although terrorist activities have decreased, Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) continues to pose a security threat to the whole region, while armed groups are expanding their economic and social reach, she said.  She also expressed concern about Turkey’s military airstrikes on alleged Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) targets near the Iraqi-Turkish border, and the loss of civilian life and livelihoods.  She welcomed the agreement reached in January between the Federal Government and the Kurdistan Regional Government to unify customs duties.  “A speedy implementation of this agreement should now be a priority for both sides,” she said. 

On the humanitarian front, the United Nations aims to meet the needs of 1.75 million vulnerable Iraqis this year, and its 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan seeks $700 million from donors, she asked.  It will take many years and billions of dollars to rebuild the country, she said, welcoming Kuwait’s role in raising funds for humanitarian programmes.  She also pledged to engage with the file on the missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and missing Kuwaiti property. 

In the ensuing discussion, Kuwait’s representative commended Iraq’s desire to meet its remaining international obligations.  Kuwait has identified the remains of 236 individuals yet is unable to uncover those of the remaining missing persons.  UNAMI should follow up on the fate of detainees, missing persons and Kuwaiti property, he said, urging the Special Representative to take a new approach in that regard.  The national archives are part of Kuwait’s historic wealth and important for its national memory.  It is unfortunate that their fate is unknown. 

Echoing the calls of several speakers, China’s delegate said the international community must respect Iraq’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, and continue to support Iraq’s fight against terrorism, including by helping to bring terrorists to justice in accordance with relevant domestic laws.  “We should actively promote Iraq’s economic recovery,” he stressed, emphasizing that UNAMI has played an important role in national reconciliation efforts. 

The speaker for Cote d’Ivoire called on the Iraqi authorities to work with international officials to investigate human rights violations, pointing out that hundreds of mass graves have been discovered in Iraq.

The representative of Iraq said his country’s different political blocs are currently working to overcome obstacles to form a Government.  Iraq has set up a development plan for the next several years to reduce rates of poverty and unemployment in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  Iraq is working to fight gender-based violence, to increase women’s participation in the political and economic spheres, and to integrate Council resolution 1325 (2000) in all its plans. 

Since liberating parts of Iraq from ISIL, “we have turned a page”, he said, stressing the need to wage an intellectual battle that would defeat extremist thinking.  However, ISIL has left a deep mark on women, children, the disabled, and those displaced by the violence.  He urged all Member States to continue to support the Government’s reconstruction efforts and to help rehabilitate archaeological areas destroyed by ISIL.  Capacity-building is vital to guarantee a viable criminal justice system.  “This is one of the main obstacles to good governance,” he stressed.  On Kuwait, he said Iraq has handed over Kuwait’s archives and is committed to working together to address Kuwait’s concerns.

Also speaking today were representatives of Indonesia, South Africa and Equatorial Guinea.

The meeting began at 10:09 am and ended at 11:04 pm.

Briefing

JEANINE HENNIS-PLASSCHAERT, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq and Head of United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), said the formation of the Government of Iraq is still incomplete.  Four ministerial positions remain vacant, with three of them subject to fierce disagreements among political blocs.  The Parliament is in a one-month recess and will reconvene in early March.  “The slow pace of the completion of the Iraqi Government is undoubtedly a great concern,” she said, calling on political actors to overcome infighting and allow compromise to prevail in the interest of the Iraqi people.  She pointed out that there are experienced Iraqi women well-qualified to perform the job. 

“It is high-time for Iraqi leaders to shift [the] focus from factional politics, and to invest in addressing the immediate needs of the Iraqi citizens,” she stressed.  The 2019 budget allocations for some key development sectors, such as electricity, reflect the Government’s efforts to improve basic service delivery, yet monies for reconstruction in liberated areas are far less than actual needs.  State finances remain strongly reliant on oil sector revenues and are very vulnerable to fluctuations in oil prices.  Corruption remains vast, yet fighting it will not be easy.  Turning to relations between Baghdad and Erbil, she welcomed the agreement reached in January between the Federal Government and the Kurdistan Regional Government to unify customs duties.  “A speedy implementation of this agreement should now be a priority for both sides,” she said.  Negotiations are still under way on the government formation within the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.  Some developments seem to be unfolding, with a possible session of the Kurdistan Regional Parliament to be held 18 February. 

Although terrorist activities have decreased, Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) continues to pose a security threat to Iraq and the region, she said.  Armed groups and criminal formations operating out of State control are expanding their economic and social control on Iraq’s daily life.  She also expressed concern about Turkey’s military airstrikes on alleged Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) targets near the Iraqi-Turkish border, and the loss of civilian life and livelihoods.  She emphasized the importance of technical assistance for upcoming elections.  Equally important are strengthening community cohesion, ensuring accountability for perpetrators of gross human rights violations and bolstering women’s participation in politics.

The United Nations will meet the needs of 1.75 million vulnerable Iraqis this year, and its 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan seeks $700 million from donors, she continued.  It will take many years and billions of dollars to rebuild the country.  The United Nations country team continues to assist the Government.  In the past few months, it has assisted with the supply of medical kits and food; clearance of explosives from residential buildings; and finalization of a reconstruction plan for Mosul, among other things.  She welcomed Kuwait’s role in raising funds for humanitarian programmes and pledged to engage with the file on the missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and missing Kuwaiti property.  She urged Member States to strengthen support for this effort, by procuring field equipment and forensics.

Statements

MANSOUR AYYAD SH. A. ALOTAIBI (Kuwait) welcomed UNAMI’s efforts to help Iraq build a bright future, establish conditions conducive for security and meet humanitarian needs.  He reaffirmed Kuwait’s full cooperation with the Mission and the United Nations country team, noting that Iraq needs assistance in meeting its humanitarian needs.  “This is also our responsibility as one of the neighbouring countries,” he said, alongside the international community.  Kuwait has given assistance to Iraq since the start of its reconstruction, he said, welcoming the national dialogue in hopes it will provide security for all segments of society.  Recalling that Kuwait hosted an international conference for Iraq’s reconstruction, he shared concerns about the threat of sleeper terrorist cells in Iraq and the region, calling for redoubled efforts to bring to justice the perpetrators of those crimes, notably through the mechanism established by Council resolution 2379 (2017).

Turning to international obligations, missing Kuwaitis and third-party nationals, he recalled the twenty-eighth anniversary of Kuwait’s liberation from Iraqi aggression, which could not be fully celebrated so long as the whereabouts of loved ones is unknown.  He welcomed the Council’s support in keeping that humanitarian dossier on its agenda.  Commending Iraq’s desire to meet its remaining international obligations, he said Kuwait has identified the remains of 236 individuals, yet is unable to uncover the remains of the remaining missing persons.  Kuwait is ready to provide assistance to Iraq to expedite that work.  Welcoming efforts by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to complete that humanitarian dossier, he said gains can be made if plans are implemented in the framework of the Tripartite Commission and its technical subcommission.  He urged UNAMI to follow up on the fate of detainees, missing persons and Kuwaiti property — notably the national archives — urging the Special Representative to take a new approach in that regard.  The national archives are part of Kuwait’s historic wealth and important for its national memory, he said, and it is unfortunate that their fate is unknown.  It is high time for the international community to support Iraq’s efforts in carrying out its role in the region and world.

MUHSIN SYIHAB (Indonesia), commending Iraq on the formation of the new Government, said he looked forward to the appointment of the remaining ministerial positions, confident that the Cabinet appointments will be completed soon.  He welcomed last year’s election in Kurdistan Region of Iraq and progress made in relations between Baghdad and Erbil.  He encouraged parties to resolve all outstanding issues through dialogue and consensus, based on Iraq’s Constitution, stressing that security challenges must be effectively addressed, especially terrorism, as ISIL/Da’esh members are active in several provinces.  Enhanced regional and international cooperation is also critical and support by UNAMI remains vital.  He welcomed the Mission’s efforts to enhance bilateral relations between Iraq and Kuwait on the settlement of remaining bilateral issues.  Closure of the file on missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals, and on missing Kuwaiti property, will help advance relations.

MA ZHAOXU (China) welcomed the progress in government formation and commended the leaders of Iraq for their efforts to resolve their differences.  Iraq is at a critical stage in promoting peace, stability and reconstruction.  The international community must earnestly respect Iraq’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and continue to support its fight against terrorism.  The international community should also support Iraq in bringing terrorists to justice in accordance with relevant domestic laws.  “We should actively promote Iraq’s economic recovery,” he stressed, emphasizing that UNAMI has played an important role in national reconciliation and reconstruction efforts.  It has also assisted Iraq in improving its relations with regional countries, including Kuwait.  The Chinese Red Cross has provided medical assistance to the people of Iraq and will continue to support Iraq’s economic recovery.

JERRY MATJILA (South Africa) welcomed the formation of Iraq’s national Government, encouraging all actors to work together to finalize the Cabinet so the Government can start delivering on its promises for better security, the dignified return of internally displaced persons, rehabilitated public services and a revitalized economy.  The ISIL threat must be addressed, as the group’s continued presence has consequences for stability in Iraq and the entire region.  He supported Iraq’s efforts to hold perpetrators accountable for crimes committed in the country, in line with Council resolution 2379 (2017), and encouraged all stakeholders to support UNAMI’s post-conflict reconstruction efforts.  More broadly, he welcomed the increased involvement of regional organizations in the political process, as well as the renewed talks between Iraq and the Kurdistan Regional Government, encouraging them to reach consensus on areas of concern.  Calling the formation of the new national Government an important step towards building more balanced relationships among Middle East countries, he reiterated support for Iraq’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.

GBOLIÉ DÉSIRÉ WULFRAN IPO (Cote d’Ivoire) stressed the urgent need for rebuilding zones affected by conflict, respecting ethnic diversity and creating the conditions needed for reconciliation, and ensuring the equal representation of women in institutions and decision-making structures.  He welcomed negotiations between the two parties which have allowed for a set of agreements, including the opening of an airport and the sale of oil.  In addition, the agreement with the Kurdistan Regional Government is a positive step in overcoming differences.  He called on the Iraqi authorities to work with international officials to investigate human rights violations.  Hundreds of mass graves have been discovered in Iraq, he said, stressing the need to conduct and conclude full investigations on the matter.  He called on the international community to continue to provide assistance and training to the Iraqi Armed Forces and welcomed their increased role in establishing security and peace.

JOB OBIANG ESONO MBENGONO (Equatorial Guinea) congratulated Iraqis on electing a new President who has put forward an ambitious manifesto to facilitate transparency and promote reform, calling those 2018 events a “huge stride” towards democracy, stability and a sustainable environment for Iraq.  UNAMI, meanwhile, has supported local authorities in various aspects of State reconstruction.  He nonetheless expressed concern over the difficulties in fully forming the new Government, stressing that the acceptance of a Prime Minister by the main political blocs would clear the way for the rest of the Cabinet.  Failure to surmount that impasse will impact the country and parties must seek common ground, as the Government’s work is essential for advancing development.  Recalling the President’s tour to regional countries last November, he expressed hope that those efforts would yield better cooperation on counter-terrorism, which would greatly help Iraqi security services, as ISIL still represents an asymmetric threat in the north and centre of the country.  In addition, Iraq and Turkey must address the situation in the north.  Recalling that the Finance Minister stated in January that the Government and the Regional Kurdistan Government had decided to align customs and other legislation, he welcomed the agreement to resume oil exports from Kirkuk.  Such progress demonstrated good will of political leaders.  He encouraged Iraq to build on recent momentum to hand over materials — such as books, television and video archives — to Kuwait, and to exhibit the highest degree of cooperation in completing its work on that important file.

MOHAMMED HUSSEIN BAHR ALULOOM (Iraq) said the recent legislative elections were transparent, and currently the different political blocs are working to overcome obstacles to form a Government.  They are working to guarantee stability and peace.  The unity Government plans to pay salaries to all officials in the Kurdistan region in 2019.  Furthermore, Iraq has set up a development plan for the next several years to reduce rates of poverty and unemployment in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  On Iraq’s cooperation with United Nations agencies, he said it has working to fight gender-based violence and had just opened its first shelter for women in partnership with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).  The Government also has created a plan to increase women’s participation in the political and economic spheres and it is working to integrate Council resolution 1325 (2000) in all its national plans. 

Iraq is also working to contain the threat from weapons of mass destruction, he continued.  Emphasizing that the Government is striving to meet the challenges the country faces, he added: “This requires a safe environment.”  He welcomed the international community’s support to strengthen the education sector, noting that in the 1970s, Iraq had an exceptional education system.  ISIL has left a deep mark on women, children, the disabled, and those displaced by the violence.  He urged all Member States to continue to support the Government’s reconstruction efforts.  He also called on the international community to help rehabilitate archaeological areas destroyed by ISIL.  Capacity-building is important to guarantee a viable criminal justice system.  “This is one of the main obstacles to good governance,” he added, calling on Members States to assist in counter-terrorism efforts.

Since liberating parts of Iraq from ISIL, “we have since turned a page”, he said, stressing the need to wage an intellectual battle that would defeat extremist thinking.  He said the Government is working to repair previously occupied parts of Iraq and stressed the need to financially compensate displaced persons.  Iraq’s relationship with Kuwait has improved drastically.  Achieving sustainable development will be positive for both countries and the region.  Iraq has already handed over Kuwait’s archives and is committed to working together to continue addressing Kuwait’s concerns.

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Has anyone noticed that the UN, the Security Council said ".  Corruption remains vast, yet fighting it will not be easy".  Yet, they have not given a plan to correct!  I am sure the history of corruption between the IMF and Iraq still prevails as it has in previous history  #oilforfood.  Iraq/GOI/the Honestly need to prosecute the top government officials like Maliki before ANY honest country will invest the significant amount of money needed  to reconstrct Iraq.

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The United Nations marks "political fighting" in Iraq and warns of the consequences of "big"

The United Nations marks "political fighting" in Iraq and warns of the consequences of "big"
 
 



 Twilight News    
 one hour ago

The new UN envoy to Iraq to end what it called the political fighting in order to complete the formation of the government, warning that further delay in this matter could lead to "significant repercussions" on the stability of the country. 
The Iraqi people "bear the brunt of the political stalemate" at a time when it is necessary to meet demands for better services, with water and electricity at the top of the list, Janine Hines-Plasschart told the Security Council. 
"There are still four ministerial portfolios vacant, and there are sharp differences on three of them - defense, interior and justice." 
Haines-Plasschart urged political parties to make concessions. 
"The time has come for Iraqi leaders to abandon sectarian politics and make efforts to meet the urgent needs of Iraqi citizens, because further delays could give room for serious consequences for the stability of the country," she said.
Iraqi political leaders stated that there were well-qualified women and their participation in senior positions remained very limited. 
She reported that she set up a women's advisory group on reconciliation and politics on January 24, which will provide independent advice to the UN political mission in Iraq and elsewhere. 
"The parties and blocs in the country are working to overcome all obstacles so that an agreement and a government can be reached, which will contribute to the stability of the whole region," said Mohammed Bahr al-Ulum, the Iraqi ambassador to the United Nations. 
The Security Council said in a press statement that it looked forward to Iraq completing the formation of its government "in order to strengthen Iraq's sovereignty, national unity, independence and regional integration, and to meet the needs of all Iraqis, including maintaining security and combating terrorism."
The council called on Iraqi parties and groups to maintain priorities for political, economic and social reforms, fight corruption, and "promote reconstruction, economic development, accountability, stability and prosperity."

Keywords: 

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Hmm ..... reckon there’s plenty of time to tend to these matters once they’ve returned from that all too important 5 weeks OFF.

 

They were all but spent Dealing with the 2019 Budget. The UN really should stop crowding the GOI. Always hounding....geeeez. 

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Al-Otaibi praised Baghdad's serious desire to meet its international obligations

Kuwait calls for a new innovative approach to uncovering the fate of our martyrs and returning property from Iraq

826648_p0303150219_main_New.jpg

 
 

Kuwait urged the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) to continue to carry out its mandate in the follow-up to the issue of prisoners and missing persons and to return property, including national archives, calling for a new innovative approach to ensure that these issues are pushed forward. 
This came in the speech of Kuwait, delivered by its Permanent Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Mansour Al-Otaibi at a Security Council session on Iraq. Al-Otaibi said that Kuwait continues its efforts to continue to reveal the fate of its martyrs, despite the diminishing chances of finding them alive, and appreciates the keenness of members of the Security Council for years to keep this humanitarian file on its agenda. The follow-up to Council members assessed the implementation of all the obligations set out in the relevant resolutions of the Security Council, especially those relating to the major remaining obligations that have not been resolved since the liberation of Kuwait in 1991.
He commended the efforts of UNMIK and the United Nations family in Iraq to build a promising future for Iraq, from the creation of conditions conducive to security and stability, to meeting humanitarian needs and to the provision of sustainable development. 
Al-Otaibi stressed the continued support of Kuwait and its cooperation with the mission and the Qatari team in order to carry out their duties to the fullest extent. He referred to the international obligations and outstanding humanitarian issues relating to missing Kuwaiti nationals and property, including national archives. 
Al-Otaibi praised Iraq's keenness to fulfill all its remaining international obligations towards Kuwait as required. He pointed out that the discovery of the remains of 236 out of the 605 missing would not have been possible without Iraq's cooperation.
Al-Otaibi urged the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq to follow up and continue to implement its mandate regarding the follow-up of the issue of prisoners and missing persons and the return of property, including national archives, by resolution 2107/2013. The United Nations welcomed Kuwait's role in raising funds for humanitarian programs in Iraq, Kuwaiti nationals and third-country nationals and lost Kuwaiti property. In a speech at a UN Security Council session on Iraq, the head of the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq, Hennes Plassert, urged political actors to overcome internal fighting and allow compromises to prevail for the benefit of the Iraqi people. 
"It is time for leaders in Iraq to shift the focus from factional politics to investing in meeting the immediate needs of citizens," she said. "Despite the formation of the government, Iraq is still incomplete."
Noting some positive developments, including the budget allocations for the electricity sector in 2019, she said that this step reflects the government's efforts to improve the provision of basic services. However, funding for reconstruction in the liberated areas is much less than what is required, Oil revenues are subject to oil price volatility while corruption remains widespread and fighting is not easy. 
Although terrorist activities have decreased, the Da'ash organization continues to pose a security threat to the entire region as armed groups expand their economic and social reach, Palasert said. 
At the humanitarian level, Placert stressed that the United Nations aims to meet the needs of 1.75 million vulnerable Iraqis this year as the humanitarian response plan for 2019 seeks 700 million dollars from donors.

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16-02-2019 10:29 AM

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Baghdad

The Permanent Delegation of Kuwait to the United Nations made a presidential statement to the Security Council on developments related to the search for Kuwaiti missing persons, third-country nationals and Kuwaiti property, including national archives.

"The Security Council recalls its resolution 2107 (2013) on the situation between Iraq and Kuwait and all its previous resolutions and presidential statements dealing with issues of missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and the return of Kuwaiti property, including national archives," the draft presidential statement circulated by the delegation said. And takes note of the reports of the Secretary-General submitted pursuant to paragraph 4 of resolution 2107 (2013).

"The Security Council commends UNAMI's ongoing efforts to implement resolution 2107 (2013), and expresses its full support to the Special Representative, the Mission's Head of Mission, Jeanine Blachachart, and the Deputy Special Representative for Political Affairs of the Mission, Alice and Paul, in their efforts to resolve Pending issues relating to Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and the return of Kuwaiti property, including national archives, and urges them to continue to work on these issues. "

"The Security Council expresses its profound gratitude to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and former United Nations Mission chief Kofi Annan for his tireless efforts to fully implement resolution 2107.

In the presidential statement, the Security Council noted "the strong bilateral relations between Iraq and Kuwait and commends the continued support of the Government of Kuwait for Iraq in its efforts to achieve stability and welcomes Iraq's efforts to meet all remaining commitments in accordance with the relevant Security Council resolutions."

"The Security Council also notes the ongoing cooperation between Iraq and Kuwait in the search for missing Kuwaiti and third-country nationals and the positive efforts of the Iraqi Ministry of Defense in this important humanitarian endeavor and encourages the Iraqi Government to continue to make these efforts in the same constructive spirit and to ensure that all Appropriate institutional, financial and technical support to facilitate future activities and also encourages the international community to provide the necessary advanced and innovative technical equipment to the Iraqi authorities to help identify burial sites in accordance with best practices'.

"The Security Council shares the view expressed by the Secretary-General in his reports that the verification of the fate of missing persons and the provision of responses to their bereaved families depend on demonstrating firm commitment and taking action and adopting new and innovative ways to advance the issue."

The Security Council expressed "strong support for the perseverance of the members of the tripartite mechanism and its chairmanship of the International Committee of the Red Cross in their efforts to find the remains of missing persons and informs the Security Council of the last meeting of the Technical Subcommittee of the tripartite mechanism on 11 December 2018 and the last meeting of the Thirteenth Committee on 13 December last ' .

"The Security Council welcomes the continued commitment of the Government of Iraq to return all remaining Kuwaiti property, including the national archives, and notes the important steps recently taken by the governments of Iraq and Kuwait to activate the work on this file and welcomes the special process of handing over a batch of Kuwaiti property paid by the President of Iraq, His last visit to Kuwait in November last '.

The Security Council encourages the Government of Iraq to "continue to search for lost property, to promote the search for lost Kuwaiti national archives and to express its intention to keep these important issues in mind".

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