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Next Wednesday .. Security Council to hold a meeting on Iraq

 

 From 2018-05-28 at 17:33 (Baghdad time)

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Mawazine News - follow-up to 
convene the Security Council in the United Nations session on the situation in Iraq on Wednesday. 
"The meeting will be held on Wednesday at 10 am New York time (5 pm Baghdad time), and is expected to be the Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations in Iraq Yan," UNAMI said in a press statement, Kubic, to brief shortly after the start of the meeting. " 
"The Special Representative will be briefed on developments in Iraq and the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI)," the statement said. 
The Iraqis voted Saturday (12 May, 2018) to elect a new parliament. These elections are the first after the defeat of the terrorist "Da'ash" organization, while the Independent Electoral Commission announced that the participation rate in the elections was 44%.
Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced on Saturday (December 9, 2017) the liberation of the Iraqi-Syrian border, stressing that the Iraqi territories are liberated from the control of the organization calling the terrorist.

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They better get their together because.......

 

2018/05/28 17:08

Number of readings 233

Section: Iraq

Security Council to hold a meeting on Iraq next Wednesday

BAGHDAD / Al-Masala: The Security Council will hold next Wednesday, 30 May 2018, a session on the situation in Iraq .

A statement issued on Monday, May 28, 2018, posted on the "United Nations - Iraq" that "the UN Security Council will be held at the United Nations session on the situation in Iraq, next Wednesday," 30 May 2018 "at 10 am New York time," the fifth evening Baghdad time ".

"It is expected that the Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations in Iraq, Jan Kubic, briefing shortly after the start of the meeting," adding that "the briefing will be on developments in Iraq and the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq," UNAMI.

http://almasalah.com/ar/news/138252/مجلس-الأمن-يعقد-جلسة-بشأن-العراق-الاربعاء-المقبل

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Urgent policy .. United Nations to monitor fraud and armed intimidation in the Iraqi elections

Urgent: United Nations monitors fraud and armed intimidation in the Iraqi elections
 
 Twilight News    
 
 one hour ago
 

 

The UN special representative for Iraq, Jan Kubic, said on Thursday that there were fraud and intimidation of armed groups in Iraq's legislative elections held on May 12. 
The Electoral Commission on Wednesday announced the abolition of the results of the vote in 1021 polling stations inside and outside Iraq in the general parliamentary elections, at a time of increasing demands to cancel the elections or a manual recount of the results. 
"Iraq's legislative elections were held on May 12. Iraqis were able to vote and their representatives were chosen freely and safely; liberated areas saw a free vote for the first time after the victory of Iraqi forces and a crushing defeat," Kubic said in his briefing to the Security Council on Iraq and its successor, Shafak News.
"The elections were characterized by low voter turnout, and the decision by more than half of the population voting not to exercise their democratic right sends a strong signal to their representatives to live up to the expectations of the people," he said. 
"After the elections and the announcement of the preliminary results, many political leaders have publicly supported the electoral process, including the prime minister and his republican president, but in other areas, particularly Kirkuk, there have been complaints demanding manual counting of the results, especially by Arabs and Turkmen." 
"We urge the Electoral Commission to resolve all appeals in an appropriate and timely manner. The post-election period represents a crucial time for the new government to work on the path of much-needed political, economic and social reforms.
He added that "the continuation of the military presence in the camps, in addition to sexual harassment of women and girls, in addition to some electoral fraud and intimidation by armed groups." 
The country is witnessing a state of political boiling on the back of doubts about tampering with the results of the parliamentary elections, where the Iraqi parliament called for the Electoral Commission to conduct a counting and hand counting by 10% of the results of elections across the country and the cancellation of the results of the vote of the outside and displaced, while other political forces are demanding the cancellation of the election results in general.

 
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UNITED NATIONS, United States — Following elections, Iraq must move quickly to form a government that can overcome sectarian divisions and push ahead with badly-needed reforms, the UN envoy said on Wednesday.

An alliance led by nationalist cleric Moqtada Sadr won the biggest share of seats in parliamentary elections on May 12, the first polls held since the defeat of Daesh.

The election saw a record number of abstentions as Iraqis snubbed the corruption-tainted elite that has dominated the country since the 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein. 

"The post-election phase represents a crucial time for Iraq," UN envoy Jan Kubis told a Security Council meeting on Iraq, calling for the swift formation of a new government.

"It is essential that the new government works as one across the sectarian and ethnic divides in pursuing much-needed political, economic and social reforms," he said.

The new government will face the daunting task of rebuilding the country, just five months after the defeat of the Daesh militant group. 

Sadr is working to form a government of technocrats and has called for less foreign meddling, raising tensions with the United States and Iran.

US Ambassador Nikki Haley said the government formation talks represented a "key moment in Iraqi history".

"Iraq's next government is going to make a series of important decisions that will set Iraq's course for decades to come," Haley told the council. 

The new government "will have to decide whether Iraq is serious about elevating female leaders" and set policies that "will allow Iraq to close the door on the extremism and the sectarian politics that have caused so much suffering before", she added. 

The council last month postponed a planned visit to Iraq that had been proposed by the United States, at the request of the former government. No new date for a visit has been proposed, diplomats said.

 

http://jordantimes.com/news/region/new-iraq-gov’t-must-overcome-sectarian-divide-—-un

 

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NEW YORK, May 30 (KUNA) -- Kuwait on Wednesday hailed the UN support to Iraq to overcome daunting security, economic and humanitarian challenges.
"I commend the efforts of the United Nations to provide advice and assistance to the Government and the people of Iraq in pursuant to the UN Security Council resolution No. 2367 (2017) through the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and its chief Jan Kubis," Kuwait's Delegate to the UN Ambassador Mansour Al-Otaibi said at a special UN Security Council meeting on developments in Iraq.
Al-Otaibi stressed the importance of continuing international support for Iraq in the coming time to address the security, political, economic and humanitarian challenges it faces especially in restoring security, stability and reconstructing the cities liberated from the so-called Islamic State group.
He shed lights on Kuwait's efforts to alleviate the suffering of Iraqi people including the hosting of the Kuwait International Conference for the Reconstruction of Iraq in mid-February which succeeded in rallying world support and attracting international donors to the rebuilding of the areas devastated by the war to pave the way for the return of displaced people to their homes.
"All these augur well about the future of Iraq and its security and stability which is an integral part of the security and stability of the State of Kuwait and the whole region," he said.
On issues relating to missing Kuwaitis and third-party nationals and properties, including national records, he expressed disappointment over the lack of progress on those matters, despite efforts made in terms of excavations and further information on possible burial sites.
There had been a lack of information on Kuwait's national records, he regretted.
He advocated a new approach that involved the technical subcommittee headed by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), as current efforts had been insufficient to end the 27?year?old suffering of families.
He looked forward to further cooperation with Iraq as the countries sought to settle problems and build relationships based on good neighborliness and noninterference in State affairs.
He congratulated Iraq on the holding of parliamentary elections, which had taken place in a transparent environment, reflecting solidarity with the Constitution and the highest international standards.
This year was an historic one for the rule of law and reconstruction in Iraq, and the new phase would require international support so the Government could confront political, security and humanitarian challenges, he said.
He expressed hope that a consensus-based Government would soon be formed to meet its people's aspirations. 

https://www.kuna.net.kw/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=2729698&Language=en

 

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11 minutes ago, Pitcher said:

I liked this sentence.

 

“Iraq's next government is going to make a series of important decisions that will set Iraq's course for decades to come,"

 

Pitcher i like it too , but that quote will take them several more election cycles just to form the committees for discussions about important decisions going by their past track records of parliament gatherings with no quorum, they enjoy hanging out in the cafeteria way too much then again sadr's technocrat gov. might not like cafeteria food  .... j/k man  , watching waiting  .... cheers

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  • yota691 changed the title to Following Democratic Elections in Iraq, Tackling Sectarian Divide, Terrorist Threat Key to Prevent Rise of Violent Extremism, Top Officials Tell Security Council
SC/13359
30 MAY 2018
8271ST MEETING (AM)

Following Democratic Elections in Iraq, Tackling Sectarian Divide, Terrorist Threat Key to Prevent Rise of Violent Extremism, Top Officials Tell Security Council

Speakers Urge support for Ongoing Reconstruction, Displaced Iraqis

On the heels of largely successful democratic elections — viewed by many around the world as a historic turning point — Iraq still faced such challenges as continued terrorist threats and sectarian divisions, which must remain a priority on the international agenda, stressed the senior United Nations official in the country as he briefed the Security Council today.

Ján Kubiš, Special Representative of the Secretary‑General for Iraq, outlined recent developments, focusing his presentation on the events surrounding the country’s 12 May parliamentary elections.  Noting that the vote had taken place within the constitutionally mandated time frame, he said people had been able to cast their votes freely and safely and that liberated areas had seen a free voting process for the first time since the defeat of Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh).  “The post‑election phase represents a crucial time for Iraq,” he said, urging leaders to prioritize inclusive, non‑sectarian dialogue and ensure the swift formation of a Government that reflected the will of the people.  That was particularly true as Da’esh — though defeated militarily — continued to pose a threat, having carried out several deadly attacks in past months.

On that point, Vladimir Voronkov, Under‑Secretary‑General of the United Nations Office of Counter‑Terrorism, called on Member States to redouble their efforts to strengthen cooperation to comprehensively address terrorism and bring perpetrators to justice.  Describing his recent visit to Iraq, he pointed to the military setback of ISIL/Da’esh as evidence of the resolve of Iraqi authorities.  During the joint mission to Iraq — carried out alongside the United Nations Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate — the team had visited Fallujah to discuss how to support the local population, concluding that a national reconciliation and reconstruction process owned and driven by the Iraqi people would be critical to prevent the resurgence of violent extremism and terrorism.

Michèle Coninsx, Assistant Secretary‑General and Executive Director of the Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, outlined efforts taken to combat Iraq’s terrorist threat through non‑military means since 2015.  The Directorate had identified 33 key recommendations on ways to strengthen its overall response, she said, spotlighting the need for technical assistance in such priority areas as legal and judicial matters, countering financing of terrorism, law enforcement and border control and countering radicalization and incitement to commit terrorist acts.  In the subsequent years, the Directorate and its partners had held follow‑up meetings and visits to Iraq to ensure that discussions at Headquarters continued to reflect the situation on the ground.

Several Council members took the floor to welcome Iraq’s largely peaceful recent elections.  Some urged the international community to remain engaged with the country’s ongoing reconstruction and reform processes — underlining their importance not only for Iraq but for the wider region — while others called for redoubled efforts to support displaced Iraqis and others in need of humanitarian assistance.

Kuwait’s representative was among speakers who described Iraq’s elections as historic and a step forward for the country’s rule of law.  Noting that Iraq was entering a new phase that would require international support in confronting remaining political, security and humanitarian challenges, he said Iraq’s stability was integral to that of the region.  He looked forward to further cooperation with Iraq as the countries sought to settle problems and build relationships based on good neighbourliness and non‑interference in State affairs.

The representative of the United States agreed with others that the elections and the success of security forces in taking back territory from ISIL represented “a key moment in Iraqi history”.  The next Government must decide whether it would value diversity and create opportunities for all Iraqis, including the most vulnerable.  It must also decide whether it was serious about elevating female leaders and closing the door on extremism.  Emphasizing the need for bold leadership, she said the new Government’s commitment to “keeping the lights on and paving roads” — as well as respect for human rights and the pursuit of accountability for those responsible for Iraq’s mass atrocity crimes — would be essential for its credibility.

Iraq’s delegate, stating that the elections marked a new chapter in his nation’s history, spotlighted the large and unprecedented number of women who had participated as both voters and candidates.  Young people, too, had come out in droves to choose the candidates that best represented them.  Outlining the Government’s efforts to revitalize Iraq’s economic and social sectors, he stressed that Iraq was committed to achieving the goals enshrined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as its own national strategy to alleviate poverty and create opportunities for young people.  He also noted that Iraq had embarked on balanced relations with its neighbours, focused on building a new foreign policy based on “positive neutrality”.

Also speaking were representatives of Bolivia, Peru and Kazakhstan.

The meeting began at 10:11 a.m. and ended at 11:31 a.m.

Briefings

JÁN KUBIŠ, Special Representative of the Secretary‑General for Iraq, presented the Secretary‑General’s latest report submitted pursuant to resolution 2367 (2017) on progress made in fulfilling the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) (document S/2018/359), as well as another submitted pursuant to resolution 2107 (2013) on the issue of missing Kuwaiti property and third‑country nationals and property (document S/2018/353).  Recalling that, on 12 May — within the constitutional time frame — Iraq had held elections for its national Parliament, he said people had been able to cast their votes freely and safely and that liberated areas had seen a free voting process for the first time since the defeat of Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh).  Describing the election as historic and a step towards building a stronger Iraqi democracy, he said that despite overall calm, 47 security incidents had been recorded including attacks with improvised explosive devices.  Some attacks were claimed by Da’esh, whose threats to disrupt the elections failed.

Noting that the elections were marked by low voter turnout, with only 44 per cent — just 11 million of 24 million eligible voters — participating, he said they nevertheless sent a strong signal to the elites ruling the country since 2003.  They had been a loud call on the people’s representatives to finally rise to meet expectations, provide for the population’s needs and rise above partisan and sectarian interests.  Describing the candidates’ campaigns as broadly respectful and largely free from sectarian discourse, he welcomed that several female candidates had received high numbers of votes and 19 female candidates had been elected to Parliament.  Noting that some critics had raised concerns over some technical shortfalls associated with the electronic vote tabulation devices — as well as reports of fraud, vote rigging and political interference — he said the Council of Ministers had convened, on 24 May, an extraordinary meeting dedicated to discussing voter fraud allegations and to form a High Commission to investigate related reports.  Meanwhile, six Kurdistani parties had questioned the credibility of the electoral process in the Kurdistan region and were calling for a recount of the votes in its governorates.

Calling on all Iraqi political actors and their supporters to uphold peace and on the Electoral Commission to continue to safeguard the integrity of election materials and equipment, he said the United Nations stood ready to provide electoral advice and expertise.  “The post‑election phase represents a crucial time for Iraq,” he said, urging political leaders to build on the recent vote and prioritize inclusive, non‑sectarian dialogue and ensure the swift formation of a truly national Government that reflected the will of the people.  That Government must work across sectarian and ethnic divides and pursue much‑needed political, economic and social reforms based on the principles of equal rights, democracy and good governance.

While Da’esh’s so‑called caliphate had been defeated, that terrorist group continued to pose a threat, having killed 20 people in twin attacks on 12 April, he said.  On 16 May, Da’esh fighters opened indiscriminate fire on civilians at a funeral in Tarmiya, killing 12 and wounding 25.  On 29 May, a bomb was detonated near a girls’ school in Diyala Governorate, and explosives planted by Da’esh continued to cause civilian casualties in Kirkuk and other provinces.  Overall, 144 civilians had been killed between 1 April and 30 May, with 236 others wounded.  Warning against complacency in the face of such crimes, he said the Iraqi security forces had maintained constant pressure on the remaining Da’esh presence and activities across the country’s north, central and western regions.  The forces were conducting security clearance operations and re‑establishing their footprints in towns, villages and rural areas.  Work was also under way to clear explosive remnants of war.

Expressing hope that the incoming Government would work to reform and rehabilitate the overall security sector, he also described efforts to combat the threat emanating from the western deserts and from across the Syrian border.  In the past weeks, the Iraqi Air Force had launched three strikes on Da’esh targets inside Syria, coordinated with the latter’s Government and with the international coalition to counter ISIL.  Meanwhile, Turkish military air strikes on alleged Kurdish Workers’ Party targets near the Iraqi‑Turkish border in northern Iraq — with limited ground operations — had increased in recent months.

In that vein, he said negotiations to promote the normalization of relations between the federal Government in Baghdad and the Kurdish Regional Government in Erbil had been largely suspended during the campaign and election season.  Several measures imposed in Kurdistan following its unilateral referendum had been lifted.  Airports had been reopened and parties to the negotiations had committed to seek strong, coordinated Kurdish representation in the next Council of Representatives.  The Prime Minister of the Kurdish region, Nechirvan Barzani, had called for elections to be held there on 30 September 2018, he said, urging the region’s Parliament to take immediate action to pass the required electoral legislation.

Outlining efforts by the national Government — supported by UNAMI — towards Iraq’s reconstruction, he said a new United Nations Development Assistance Framework (2020‑2024) sought to align the Organization’s interventions with the new Government priorities.  There was a focus on implementing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, as well as on developing civilian infrastructure and facilitating the return of displaced Iraqis.  Noting that the country’s humanitarian crisis continued — with more than 2 million people still displaced and in need of aid — he expressed concerns that only 18 per cent of Iraq’s $569 million humanitarian response plan was currently funded.

He went on to express concern about alleged cases of the politicization of humanitarian assistance and protection challenges faced by women and children with perceived ties to Da’esh in displaced persons camps.  There were allegations of rape, sexual exploitation and restrictions on the freedom of movement.  All cases of alleged misconduct had been reported to the preventing sexual exploitation and abuse network and referred to the Iraqi authorities, he said, adding that UNAMI remained engaged in the urgent investigations of such reported situations.

Turning finally to human rights issues on which the Mission was focusing, he said that in April the Iraqi Ministry of Justice had announced that 13 executions had taken place so far in 2018, including for 11 terrorism‑related crimes.  The Council of Representatives had formed an investigative committee to examine potential human rights violations committed last October in Tuz Khurmatu.  On 6 April, in Mosul, two mass graves containing 73 bodies were discovered.  At least 122 mass graves had been discovered since 2014, mainly containing bodies suspected to be victims of Da’esh.  The systematic investigation of those cites and efforts to identify the victims remained critical.

VLADIMIR VORONKOV, Under‑Secretary‑General of the United Nations Office of Counter‑Terrorism, called on Member States to redouble their efforts to strengthen cooperation to comprehensively address terrorism and bring perpetrators to justice.  His visit to Iraq with Assistant Secretary‑General Michèle Coninsx in March had been organized within the framework of common efforts between the Office of Counter‑Terrorism and the Counter‑Terrorism Executive Directorate to facilitate delivery of technical assistance to Member States, in accordance with resolution 2395 (2017).  Pointing to the military setback of ISIL/Da’esh as evidence of the resolve of Iraqi authorities, he said the Government’s vigilance in consolidating that victory through a comprehensive approach focused on prevention and resilience was of utmost importance.

During the joint mission, the team had visited Fallujah to discuss how the United Nations could support the local population, he said.  It was the conclusion of the Iraqi interlocutors that national reconciliation and reconstruction — owned and driven by the Iraqi people — were essential to prevent the resurgence of violent extremism and terrorism.  The team had also had met the mayor of Fallujah and witnessed the large‑scale devastation caused by ISIL/Da’esh.

Noting that the joint delegation had reiterated the United Nations strong support to Iraq, he said the Counter‑Terrorism Office had proposed five areas in which it could provide technical assistance:  advice in the development of a national counter‑terrorism strategy; training on countering terrorism financing; youth skills development and vocational training to prevent violent extremism; strategic communications also for that purpose; and capacity‑building to prevent and respond to weapons of mass destruction‑related terrorism.

The team also had dispatched a joint scoping mission to Iraq at the beginning of May, he said, to identify elements of programmatic support under those areas.  Having held meetings with a range of ministries and national agencies, the diplomatic community, the United Nations country team and the World Bank, the Counter‑Terrorism Office, based on the findings of the scoping mission, was developing concept notes for projects that would have a measurable impact on the ground yet avoided duplication with existing initiatives.  It was also planning to deploy a consultant to support Iraq in finalizing its national counter‑terrorism strategy.  The implementation of those projects, in consultation with the Government, would start next month.

MICHÈLE CONINSX, Assistant Secretary‑General and Executive Director of the Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, noted that the Directorate conducted an assessment visit to Iraq in September 2015.  At that time, Iraq’s response to the terrorist threat was primarily military in nature.  To help the country combat terrorism through non‑military means, the Directorate identified 33 key recommendations on ways to strengthen its overall response.  The Counter‑Terrorism Committee noted that Iraq would benefit from technical assistance in 16 priority areas, including legal and judicial matters, countering financing of terrorism, law enforcement and border control and countering radicalization and incitement to commit terrorist acts.

Efforts had been undertaken to make the findings of the follow‑up visit accessible to as many donors and implementing partners as possible, she said.  In that connection, the Committee held two informal meetings on Iraq for donors and partners — in March 2016 and May 2017, respectively.  Those meetings enabled the Committee to follow up on progress achieved since 2015 and to take stock of recent developments and continued challenges.  Since those meetings, the Directorate had returned to Iraq on several occasions to ensure that the discussions held at Headquarters continued to reflect the situation on the ground.  “The focus of our efforts has been to facilitate the integration of the Committee’s recommendations into the existing or planned programmes of our implementing partners,” she said.

Throughout its engagement with Iraq, the country had retained full ownership of the assistance facilitation and delivery process and had continued to endorse the 16 identified priority areas, she underscored.  Implementing partners and organizations had also continued to share and update information concerning their current and planned efforts.  All that information was entered into a matrix designed to ensure full transparency, which was a process that not only helped avoid duplication, but also aided in developing new partnerships.  She stressed the need for Iraq to actively adopt counter‑terrorism legislation in accordance with relevant international standards to ensure that the perpetrators of terrorist acts were brought to justice in line with human rights and the rule of law.

Statements

NIKKI R. HALEY (United States) cited recent parliamentary elections and success by Iraq’s security forces in taking back territory from ISIL to protect polling stations as “a key moment in Iraqi history”.  The next Government must decide whether it would value diversity and create opportunities for all Iraqis, including the most vulnerable.  It must decide whether it was serious about elevating female leaders and closing the door on extremism.  Bold leadership would be required.  Noting that the United States would support Iraq as it moved towards a peaceful future, she said the new Government must focus on “keeping the lights on and paving roads”, which would be essential for its credibility.  It must respect and promote human rights, uphold the rule of law, pursue accountability for atrocities and collect evidence of ISIL’s mass atrocity crimes.  Indeed, Iraq must be a force for stability in the region and the United States looked forward to a partnership with the new Government which sought to fight terrorism and strengthen national institutions.  The United Nations must adapt too.  Improving UNAMI’s ability to coordinate the many United Nations agencies on the ground was essential and the Secretary‑General must carry out the related recommendations made.  The Council would soon launch its most comprehensive review of the UNAMI mandate in years.  The new mandate would be more responsive to Iraqi needs and tailored to respond to the current challenges of political reconciliation, aid delivery and support for Government institutions to deliver services.

MANSOUR AYYAD SH. A. ALOTAIBI (Kuwait) congratulated Iraq on the holding of parliamentary elections, which had taken place in a transparent environment, reflecting solidarity with the Constitution and the highest international standards.  He expressed hope that a consensus‑based Government would soon be formed to meet its people’s aspirations.  This year was an historic one for the rule of law and reconstruction in Iraq, and the new phase would require international support so the Government could confront political, security and humanitarian challenges.  Kuwait had organized the conference for Iraqi reconstruction in mid‑February, which had attracted international donors.  Iraq’s stability was integral to that of the region.  On issues relating to missing Kuwaitis and third‑party nationals and properties, including national records, he expressed disappointment over the lack of progress on those matters, despite efforts made in terms of excavations and further information on possible burial sites.  There had been a lack of information on Kuwait’s national records, a highly sensitive issue related to his Government’s cooperation with Iraq.  He advocated a new approach that involved the technical subcommittee headed by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), as current efforts had been insufficient to end the 27‑year‑old suffering of families.  He looked forward to further cooperation with Iraq as the countries sought to settle problems and build relationships based on good neighbourliness and non‑interference in State affairs.

SACHA SERGIO LLORENTTY SOLÍZ (Bolivia) said the 12 May parliamentary elections had taken place in violence‑free conditions, calling for dialogue and negotiation to establish a stable Government and develop sound institutions.  The sovereign administration of resources, such as the State‑owned oil company, could be useful for rebuilding Iraq and restoring public services.  He welcomed the permanent dialogue between the federal Government and Regional Kurdistan Government, whereby the opening of airports of Erbil and Sulaymaniyah to international traffic and the allocation of funds for payment of civil servants in Kurdistan had been agreed.  Calling for continued efforts to resolve issues of common interest, he said improvised explosive devices used during asymmetric attacks had resulted in a significant number of deaths.  Thus, removing war remnants was essential and he called for international support for United Nations Mine Action Service efforts to implement resolution 2365 (2017).  He also welcomed the tripartite meeting that had sought to help Iraq identify common graves where Kuwaitis might be buried.  Stressing that Da’esh elements remained in the country, he said the situation of 1,500 Yazidi women and children still under Da’esh control was a major concern which should be urgently addressed.  He pointed to regime‑change and interventionist policies as among the root causes of the conflict.

GUSTAVO MEZA-CUADRA (Peru), congratulating the Government and people of Iraq for the successful holding of their recent elections, nevertheless said the special commission set up to investigate allegations of voting irregularities should quickly work to address complaints.  The new Government must provide a unified and robust front to tackle such lingering issues as corruption, he said, also voicing concern over pockets of the country where Da’esh retained influence as well as about attacks carried out by that group.  Welcoming the decision of the Iraqi Government to share its assessment of technical requirements with partners — especially with regard to the fight against terrorism — he said the internarial community should provide support in that arena; focus on and support Iraq’s physical, social and economic reconstruction; and continue to prioritize the needs of the nearly 9 million Iraqis requiring humanitarian assistance, including 2 million displaced people.

KAIRAT UMAROV (Kazakhstan) congratulated Iraq for the holding of parliamentary elections on 12 May, calling on Iraqi political actors and their supporters to maintain peace as the results were processed, to resolve any electoral disputes through established legal channels and to form an inclusive Government as soon as possible.  The effectiveness of counter‑terrorism mechanisms in Iraq must be enhanced, as must border security, following ISIL’s expulsion from the country.  Calling on Iraq to join the Code of Conduct for achieving a world without terrorism initiative, and on the international community to help consolidate stability, he stressed the importance of preserving Iraq’s territorial integrity.  Extrajudicial acts of retaliation against ISIL supporters, their families and those with any connection to the group must not be permitted and he urged the Government to bring perpetrators to justice.  Kazakhstan also supported measures to achieve Iraq’s most critical goals of preserving unity, re‑establishing stability and fostering peaceful coexistence.

MOHAMMED HUSSEIN BAHR ALULOOM (Iraq) said that Iraqis marching to the voting polls on 12 May to elect members to its House of Representatives was of major significance as it represented the beginning of a new chapter, following Iraq’s victory over ISIL/Da’esh.  A large and unprecedented number of women participated as voters and candidates, and young people came out in droves to choose the candidates that best represented them.  The Government succeeded in providing a secure electoral environment for its citizens, he said, adding that the Independent High Electoral Commission had opened the door to hear complaints and appeals from political entities or parties.  After studying and auditing those appeals, and taking the appropriate action, the Commission would submit the names of the winners to the Federal Court for formal approval and adoption.

He noted various steps the Government was taking to revitalize Iraq’s economic and social sectors, emphasizing that Iraq remained committed to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  Iraq’s own national strategy focused on alleviating poverty and creating more jobs and opportunities for young people.  The Government, with help from the United Nations, aimed to prepare a generation that was productive, well educated, in good health, engaged in communities and immune to radical terrorism.

ISIL/Da’esh had shown extraordinary cruelty to Iraqi men, women and children, he continued, adding that the Council’s adoption of resolution 2379 (2017) represented a victory for justice and fairness.  An independent investigative mechanism was collecting evidence of crimes against women and children, including sexual and gender‑based violence.  Iraq was keen to redress and compensate all victims of the horrendous crimes of sexual violence and to involve women in peacebuilding, reconciliation and reconstruction initiatives.

He affirmed Iraq’s continued commitment to address the suffering of the victims of sexual violence, underscoring the important role played by the 2016 joint communique between the United Nations and Iraq, and the need to engage with civil society, tribal leaders and media.  Iraq was also focused on improving its vocational and technical training institutes in Baghdad and Fallujah and supporting the development of a comprehensive national strategy to combat terrorism.

Iraq had established balanced relations with its neighbours with a focus on building a new foreign policy based on “positive neutrality”, he said, adding:  “It is in Iraq’s interest to the be outside the circle of conflicts in the region.”  Iraq would focus more on cooperation, partnership, the exchange of ideas, stability and development.  “There are great opportunities to invest in all the Iraqi provinces,” he added.  Iraq would continue to fulfil its obligations related to its outstanding matters with Kuwait.  In regards to Kuwaiti missing persons, Iraqi authorities were still carrying out their research and investigations.  The Iraqi Government was in the process of handing over the first batch of Kuwaiti property and archives.  He also underscored Iraq’s willingness to extend the mandate of UNAMI, which had a major role in rebuilding basic service infrastructure destroyed and damaged by the war and in restoring stability in reclaimed areas.

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Ján Kubiš, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), briefs the Security Council meeting on the situation concerning Iraq.
    
30 May 2018

The low voter turnout for Iraq’s recent national elections was a “strong signal” to the country’s ruling political elites that they must work harder to ease sectarian divides and promote democratic accountability over nepotism and patronage, the United Nations envoy to the country said on Wednesday.

Briefing the Security Council, Ján Kubiš, the top UN official in Iraq, urged the country’s political leaders “to draw the necessary conclusions” from the fact that less than half the country’s people exercised their right to vote “on the need for improved representation, justice for all and good governance.”

In forming the new government, the leaders must ensure full participation of women, both in political negotiations, as well as at the highest level of decision making in the country, added Mr. Kubiš.

Political leaders, he said, should also build upon the achievements of the current Government, prioritise inclusive, non-sectarian dialogue, and ensure the swift formation of a new “truly national” government that reflects the will of the people of Iraq.

It is essential that the new government works as one across the sectarian and ethnic divides in pursuing much needed political, economic and social reforms– UN envoy Ján Kubiš

“It is essential that the new government works as one across the sectarian and ethnic divides in pursuing much needed political, economic and social reforms, based on the principles of patriotism and citizenship with equal rights, justice and opportunity for all and good governance while working to improve the economy, public services delivery and social justice.”

The envoy, who heads up the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), also noted reports of irregularities at various locations and called on independent electoral management bodies to adjudicate all appeals properly, fully and in time, to enable corrections of the problems, justice and the timely certification of the final election results.

Looking beyond the political situation, Mr. Kubiš told the 15-member Council that the humanitarian crisis persists across Iraq, with over 2.1 million people displaced but severely limited resources to provide aid or implement demining programmes.

“Out of the required $569 million in the Humanitarian Response Plan, only $101 million in donor contributions, or 18 per cent was received as of 15 May,” he said, urging the international community to step up their efforts to support vulnerable populations.

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UN Photo/Loey Felipe
Vladimir Voronkov, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism, addresses the Security Council meeting on the situation in Iraq..

Iraqi-owned and driven reconciliation and reconstruction essential to prevent resurgence of violent extremism

Also briefing the Security Council today, Vladimir Voronkov, the head of the UN Counter-Terrorism Office, urged continued determination of the Iraqi Government to consolidate the military victory against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) through an approach that is focused on both prevention and strengthening resilience.

Recalling a mission to Iraq by his Office together with the UN Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate (CTED), Mr. Voronkov said that all interlocutors stressed the country’s continued commitment to fighting terrorism as it transitions from a military-focused counter-terrorism approach to a more comprehensive one, which includes prevention, law enforcement and criminal justice components.

“It was the conclusion of our Iraqi interlocutors that national reconciliation and reconstruction, owned and driven by the Iraqi people, are essential to prevent the resurgence of violent extremism and terrorism in Iraq,” he said.

 

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UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe
Michèle Coninsx, Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED), briefs the Security Council meeting on the situation concerning Iraq.

Michèle Coninsx, Assistant Secretary‑General and Executive Director of the Counter‑Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, outlined efforts taken to combat Iraq’s terrorist threat through non‑military means since 2015.

The Directorate identified 33 key recommendations on ways to strengthen its overall response, she said, spotlighting the need for technical assistance in such priority areas as legal and judicial matters, countering financing of terrorism, law enforcement and border control and countering radicalization and incitement to commit terrorist acts. 

“Subsequently years, the Directorate and its partners held follow‑up meetings and visits to Iraq to ensure that discussions at Headquarters continued to reflect the situation on the ground.” She explained.

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Video that I've yet figure out how to post...:lol: 

 

 

 

SRSG Ján Kubiš on the situation in Iraq - Security Council, 8271st meeting
 
 
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Published on May 30, 2018
Edited by Markinsa
Use the link with the "youtu.be"
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Ambassador Nikki Haley
U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
U.S. Mission to the United Nations
New York City
May 30, 2018

AS DELIVERED

Thank you, Madam President, and thank you to the briefers. I especially want to thank Mr. Kubis. We thank you for the three years of service leading the UNAMI mission through what has been a very challenging period.

Just three years ago, Iraq was in a very different place. ISIS controlled Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, and it captured territory stretching to within thirty minutes of Baghdad. ISIS fighters were committing unspeakable atrocities against Iraqis, including selling women into sexual slavery and murdering religious minorities. They were using their safe haven to plan attacks against the West. But that was three years ago.

Today, Iraq is liberated. With the support of the United States and other Coalition allies, Iraqis have taken their country back. Displaced persons are returning to their homes and beginning to rebuild. Most importantly, Iraqis have successfully conducted national parliamentary elections. Iraqi Security Forces went from taking territory back from ISIS to protecting polling places in just a few short months. Government formation talks are already underway. This is a key moment in Iraqi history.

Iraq’s next government is going to make a series of important decisions that will set Iraq’s course for decades to come. It will fall to Iraq’s next government to decide whether to truly value diversity and create opportunities for all of Iraq’s people. This includes some of Iraq’s most vulnerable citizens in towns and villages far from Baghdad. The next government will have to decide whether Iraq is serious about elevating female leaders. And it will be responsible for governing inclusively. That means setting policies that allow Iraq to close the door on the extremism and the sectarian politics that have caused so much suffering before.

Iraq’s next government has its work cut out for it. Bold leadership will be required. Government formation is a challenging process, but once it is complete, the United States will stand ready to support Iraq as it continues moving toward a more peaceful and prosperous future.

As Iraq emerges from the shadow of ISIS’s terror, the government has to focus on getting the basics right. Keeping the lights on and paving roads might seem like small steps, but delivering these services will be essential for the credibility of the new Iraqi government. It will also be vital for the government to respect and promote human rights. Especially after ISIS’s crimes, Iraqis must be confident that their leaders will uphold the rule of law and pursue accountability for atrocities. One important part of this effort will be the work carried out by the UN and Iraq under Security Council Resolution 2379 to collect evidence of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide by ISIS. This collaboration could serve as a model on how to achieve justice throughout Iraq.

There is no question that Iraq is in a tough neighborhood. Surrounded by serious threats, Iraq must be a force for stability in the region. The United States looks forward to a partnership with the next Iraqi government that will allow us to address these threats, combat terrorism, and strengthen the independence of Iraq’s institutions.

Just as Iraq is starting a new chapter, the UN and its mission in Iraq must adapt too. Last year, the Security Council requested that the UN carry out an external assessment of the UNAMI mission in Iraq. The review team came back with a long list of recommendations. Many are quite technical. But they add up to an important vision for reform – one that would make UNAMI more efficient and better at coordinating among the many different UN agencies that operate on the ground. Now the responsibility falls to the Secretary-General to fully carry out these recommendations and keep the Council informed on their progress. The United States will be closely following that progress.

This month, we will also be launching the most substantial review by the Security Council of the UNAMI mandate in years. The new mandate will be more focused, responsive to the needs of the Iraqi people, and tailored to address the current challenges in Iraq. The UN must target the areas where Iraq needs the greatest support, such as political reconciliation, delivery of humanitarian aid, and support to government institutions to deliver basic services.

Iraq’s achievements in defeating ISIS and carrying out elections deserve our collective recognition and praise. Iraq has taken major strides toward a more stable, secure, and democratic future. Now Iraq’s leaders have the hard task of assembling their government and showing that they can deliver on the high expectations of their people. The United States will be ready to support Iraq in achieving this goal. Thank you.

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Vladimir Voronkov (USG for Counter-Terrorism) on Iraq - Security Council, 8271st meeting

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Remarks by Vladimir Voronkov, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Office, on the situation in Iraq.
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5 minutes ago, yota691 said:

Video that I've yet figure out how to post...:lol: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrjktZGBdmY

SRSG Ján Kubiš on the situation in Iraq - Security Council, 8271st meeting
 
 
18 views
ACSszfHoqAOtbqb64FxAkJ8KrcryVOD0MmcmU3jp
Published on May 30, 2018

YOU CANT . the rules of this forum have been update .  just because the plugin that adam  using would not give using embed in forum . but thanks your information in this forum . 

Edited by normala rashid
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  • yota691 changed the title to The United Nations calls for the formation of an Iraqi government free of corruption

The United Nations calls for the formation of an Iraqi government free of corruption

 

 Since 2018-05-30 at 17:25 (Baghdad time)

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Follow - up - the balance of News 
The representative of the Secretary - General of the United Nations in Iraq , Jan Kubiš, Wednesday, improve Iraq 's capabilities in the fight against terrorism, noting that Iraq 's demands usually consider the results of the elections. 
"Iraq has achieved great results in the fight against terrorism and the democratic process," said Kubic during a Security Council session on Iraq, followed by Iraq's leaders to "form a comprehensive government free from corruption." 
He added that "armed groups carried out fraud and intimidation during the elections, and that the international mission called on the Iraqi authorities to recount the votes in a number of areas, including Kirkuk," noting that "the Arab and Turkmen masses in the province of Kirkuk demanded a manual recount and we support those trends."
He explained that "after the end of the elections and the announcement of preliminary results, emerged several political leaders publicly supported the electoral process, including the Prime Minister and President of the Republic, but in other areas, especially Kirkuk, there have been complaints demanding manual counting of the results, especially by the Arabs and Turkmen," he said. That "the Iraqi Council of Representatives also called for the re-counting and manual counting for 10 percent of the stations." 
He pointed out that "the elections were characterized by low voter turnout, and the decision taken by more than half of the population voting not to exercise their democratic right sends a strong signal to their representatives to meet the expectations of the people." 
Kubic urged the Electoral Commission to "resolve all appeals in an appropriate and timely manner. The post-election period represents a crucial time for the new government to work on the path of much-needed political, economic and social reforms."
"There is a continuing military presence in the camps, in addition to sexual harassment of women and girls, in addition to some electoral fraud and intimidation by armed groups," Kubic said. 
The Iraqis voted Saturday (12 May 2018) to elect a new parliament. These elections are the first after the defeat of the terrorist organization Da'ash. The Independent Electoral Commission announced that the participation rate in the elections was 44%. Finished

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fit

 

 
 UN special envoy for Iraq Jan Kubic said on Thursday that he had witnessed the fraud and intimidation of armed groups in Iraq's legislative elections held on May 12.
 "Iraq's legislative elections were held on May 12. Iraqis were able to vote and their representatives were chosen freely and safely; the liberated areas saw a free vote for the first time after the victory of Iraqi forces and a daunting defeat," Kubic said in his briefing to the Security Council on Iraq.
"The elections were characterized by low voter turnout, and the decision by more than half of the population voting not to exercise their democratic right sends a strong signal to their representatives to live up to the expectations of the people," he said.
"After the elections and the announcement of the preliminary results, many political leaders have publicly supported the electoral process, including the prime minister and his republican president, but in other areas, particularly Kirkuk, there have been complaints demanding manual counting of the results, especially by Arabs and Turkmen."
"We urge the Electoral Commission to resolve all appeals in a timely and appropriate manner. The post-election period represents a crucial time for the new corruption-free government to be formed and to strengthen its ability in the direction of much-needed political, economic and social reforms," Kubic said.
He added that "the continuation of the military presence in the camps, in addition to sexual harassment of women and girls, in addition to some electoral fraud and intimidation by armed groups."
The country is witnessing a state of political boiling on the back of doubts about tampering with the results of the parliamentary elections, where the Iraqi parliament called for the Electoral Commission to conduct a counting and hand counting by 10% of the results of elections across the country and the cancellation of the results of the vote of the outside and displaced, while other political forces are demanding the cancellation of the election results in general.
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New Iraq government must overcome sectarian divide: UN

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)

Updated 30 May 2018

ARAB NEWS

May 30, 201817:38

309

 

UNITED NATIONS: Following elections, Iraq must move quickly to form a government that can overcome sectarian divisions and push ahead with badly-needed reforms, the UN envoy said Wednesday.
An alliance led by nationalist cleric Moqtada Sadr won the biggest share of seats in parliamentary elections on May 12, the first polls held since the defeat of Daesh.
The election saw a record number of abstentions as Iraqis snubbed the corruption-tainted elite that has dominated the country since the 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein.
“The post-election phase represents a crucial time for Iraq,” UN envoy Jan Kubis told a Security Council meeting on Iraq, calling for the swift formation of a new government.
“It is essential that the new government works as one across the sectarian and ethnic divides in pursuing much-needed political, economic and social reforms,” he said.
The new government will face the daunting task of rebuilding the country, just five months after the defeat of the IS group.
Sadr is working to form a government of technocrats and has called for less foreign meddling, raising tensions with the United States and Iran.
US Ambassador Nikki Haley said the government formation talks represented a “key moment in Iraqi history.”
“Iraq’s next government is going to make a series of important decisions that will set Iraq’s course for decades to come,” Haley told the council.
The new government “will have to decide whether Iraq is serious about elevating female leaders” and set policies that “will allow Iraq to close the door on the extremism and the sectarian politics that have cause so much suffering before,” she added.
The council last month postponed a planned visit to Iraq that had been proposed by the United States, at the request of the former government. No new date for a visit has been proposed, diplomats said.

cml/it

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1312666/middle-east

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UN call for formation of Iraqi government "non-sectarian"

Readers

 

 

8
UN call for formation of Iraqi government "non-sectarian"

 

31-05-2018 02:01 PM

 

The Euphrates -

 

The UN special envoy to Iraq called on Iraqi politicians to form a government capable of overcoming sectarian divisions after the legislative elections that took place about two weeks ago. 
"The post-election period is a critical period for Iraq," UN envoy Jan Kubic told a UN Security Council meeting on Iraq. "It is essential that the new government unite and work away from sectarian and ethnic divisions in pursuit of badly needed political and economic reforms. 

For her part, said US Ambassador to the United Nations Nicky Hayley that the formation of the government represents a 'moment of fate in the history of Iraq'. "The new Iraqi government will take a series of important decisions that will determine the course of Iraq for the coming decades," she said in her address to the Security Council. 

She also pointed out that the new government must 'decide whether Iraq is serious in promoting women's leadership', and develop policies 'allowing Iraq to close the door in the face of extremism and sectarian policies that caused a lot of suffering before'.

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  • yota691 changed the title to WASHINGTON: The next Iraqi government will make decisions that define the future of the country for decades

Big Time...

WASHINGTON: The next Iraqi government will make decisions that define the future of the country for decades

Political

 Since 2018-05-31 at 20:18 (Baghdad time)

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Follow up of Mawazine News

US envoy to the United Nations, Nicky Hailey, said the next Iraqi government will make decisions that will determine the future of Iraq for decades. 
"The Iraqis have succeeded in holding national parliamentary elections and the Iraqi security forces have moved back from the area, calling for the protection of the polling stations within a few months, and now the talks are going on forming the government," Hayley said during a UN Security Council session on the situation in Iraq. In the history of Iraq. "

"The Iraqi government has to work hard and require strong leadership, and its country will support Iraq on its way to a more prosperous future," she said. "It is essential that the future Iraqi government respect and promote human rights, especially after the crimes committed by a sympathetic organization. To partnership with the next government, which in turn allows to address the fight against terrorism and strengthen the independence of Iraqi institutions. 
She pointed out that there is work before the United Nations and Iraq in accordance with the resolution of the Security Council to collect evidence of war crimes and genocide by the organization "Da'ash" terrorist, considering that this cooperation can form a model on how to achieve justice throughout Iraq.

is over

M

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The United Nations calls for the formation of an Iraqi government " free of corruption "  - This coming from the most corrupt of ALL Government bodies on the Planet. 

 

Well, you work with ya got. Git R Done Iraq . . . oh yeah, and Hurrrrrry the Hell up , would ya ! 

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  • yota691 changed the title to Israeli hints bombarded the port of Beirut and Iraq
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