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easyrider

**Financial situation tables for cbi**

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I call BS on that one. How can the total assets amount be exactly the same as total liabilities. That is a faked spread sheet IMO. KTFA are a bunch of snakes. I'm not sure what they hope to gain from this Shiite bit it could not possibly be correct. 1.92 trillion in foreign currency reserves, IQD values. Total BS. CBI foreign currency reserves around 49 billion USD. That roughly 54 trillion dinar. Those numbers aren't adding up.

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not quite sure myself what it means was hoping someone knew more than i do about financial tables and i find it weird they use the word revaluation on their spreadsheet for current year.

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3 minutes ago, DinarDavo said:

I just googled it and came up with this....appears to be a standard accounting practice of entities that deal in multiple currencies:

 

http://www.reportsyouneed.com/blog/understanding-currency-accounting-revaluation-and-translation

 

 

 

Exactly. Thank you

Edited by gregp
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Thanks DD and the rest of you.  If that DID come from KTFA or TNT crew, their followers are easily dazzled by BS. On another note....my wife "helps" me balance our accounts by keeping things at zero. Makes the calculator obsolete, she says. Thanks honey !!  :lol:

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1 hour ago, King Bean said:

Thanks DD and the rest of you.  If that DID come from KTFA or TNT crew, their followers are easily dazzled by BS. On another note....my wife "helps" me balance our accounts by keeping things at zero. Makes the calculator obsolete, she says. Thanks honey !!  :lol:

no more luigi here..last i saw it in iqdcall chatroom but with other name  :D

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4 hours ago, mr.unlikely said:

I call BS on that one. How can the total assets amount be exactly the same as total liabilities. That is a faked spread sheet IMO. KTFA are a bunch of snakes. I'm not sure what they hope to gain from this Shiite bit it could not possibly be correct. 1.92 trillion in foreign currency reserves, IQD values. Total BS. CBI foreign currency reserves around 49 billion USD. That roughly 54 trillion dinar. Those numbers aren't adding up.

Totally agree with you mr. unlikely 

 

This are not the CBI real number... If they give us the real number we can calculate the dinar real value.

 

Go truth

Go  facts 

Go CBI 

Go new monetary policy 

Go RV

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44 minutes ago, Laid Back said:

Totally agree with you mr. unlikely 

 

This are not the CBI real number... If they give us the real number we can calculate the dinar real value.

 

Go truth

Go  facts 

Go CBI 

Go new monetary policy 

Go RV

That is exactly what I was thinking when I pulled up the link.  Let's calculate the value.  

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34 minutes ago, ChuckFinley said:

That is exactly what I was thinking when I pulled up the link.  Let's calculate the value.  

You got it Bro.!:twothumbs:

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55 minutes ago, ChuckFinley said:

That is exactly what I was thinking when I pulled up the link.  Let's calculate the value.  

 

Good idea!  Wish I was good in math.

Who's good at this stuff?   Please help.

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http://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/revaluation.asp

 

Revaluation

 
 

What is a 'Revaluation'

A revaluation is a calculated upward adjustment to a country's official exchange rate relative to a chosen baseline; the baseline can be anything from wage rates to the price of gold to a foreign currency. In a fixed exchange rate regime, only a decision by a country's government, such as its central bank, can alter the official value of the currency.

 

Revaluation is contrasted by devaluation, which is a downward adjustment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Revaluation'

Revaluations occur on a regular basis, marked by the observable fluctuations in the foreign currency market and associated exchange rates.

 

Example of Currency Revaluation

Say a government has set 10 units of its currency equal to $1 in U.S. currency. To revalue, the government might change the rate to five units per dollar. This results in its currency being twice as expensive when compared to U.S. dollars than it was previously. Before the Chinese government revalued the yuan, it was pegged to the U.S. dollar. After revaluation, It was pegged to a basket of world currencies.

Currency Revaluation and Asset Revaluation

Revaluations affect not just the currency being examined but can also affect the valuation of assets held by foreign companies in that particular currency. Since a revaluation has the potential to change the exchange rate between two countries and their respective currencies, the book values of foreign-held assets may have to be adjusted to reflect the impact of the change in the exchange rate.

 

For example, if the aforementioned currency revaluation occurred, any assets held by a U.S. company in the foreign economy need to be revalued. If the asset, held in foreign currency, was previously valued at $100,000 based on the old exchange rate, the revaluation would require its value to be changed to $200,000. This change reflects the new value of the foreign asset, in the home currency, by adjusting for the revaluation of the currency involved.

Global Events and Revaluation

Currency revaluation can be triggered by a variety of events. Some of the more common causes include changes in the interest rates between various countries and large-scale events that affect the overall profitability, or competitiveness, of an economy. Changes in leadership can also cause fluctuations, as they may signal a change in a particular market’s stability.

 

Speculative demand can also impact the value of a currency. For example, in 2016, prior to the vote determining if Britain would remain part of the European Union, speculation caused fluctuations in the value of multiple currencies, including the U.S. dollar and the Chinese yuan. Since it was not yet known whether Britain would remain, any action taken because of the possibility was considered speculative in nature.

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I still love it because in my own little mind I tripled the assets because they lie about everything. Also

they are the richest country in the world and even more so when they empty the pockets of the crooks.

Like I said it do's not take much to amuse myself.  Thanks a bunch everyone !!!  :twothumbs:

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9 minutes ago, nannab said:

I still love it because in my own little mind I tripled the assets because they lie about everything. Also

they are the richest country in the world and even more so when they empty the pockets of the crooks.

Like I said it do's not take much to amuse myself.  Thanks a bunch everyone !!!  :twothumbs:

 

 

Here you go my friend !!

 

Image result for door stopper gif

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23 minutes ago, SnowGlobe7 said:

Image result for cat playing with doorstop gif

 

:shakehead:   :shakehead:   :shakehead:

 

WAY TOO FUNNY, SnowGlobe7!!!

 

Thank You For Posting!!! :tiphat:

 

Go Moola Nova!

:pirateship:

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1 hour ago, SnowGlobe7 said:

Image result for cat playing with doorstop gif

 

Yup that would be me in my other life.  Or my rescue fat cranky old lady Bella now. Too funny :lol:

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5 hours ago, nannab said:

....it doesn't take much to amuse myself.  Thanks a bunch everyone !!!  :twothumbs:

 

Check this one, Nannab. I showed this trick to Luigi...........and he's STILL stuck. :lol:

FunnyOpticalillusions18.jpg

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