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Hello everyone,

I was just inquiring as to whether or not more people are using online currency exchange and transfer, or if visiting your local bank is still the norm. I am going to be travelling later this year and will require a large amount of foreign currency. I was going to use this website but if anyone can suggest a different site I'm open to suggestions. What I have noticed is that by exchanging foreign currency online it looks like I can save about 2% on the exchange rate. Please let me know if there are any other good foreign exchange sites to check out.

Thanks,

Mel

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