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    • By Butifldrm
      02/20/2020 09:08 Views 91 Section: Iraq   Government official: Iraq still owes Kuwait seven billion dollars
      Baghdad / Obelisk: The financial advisor to the Prime Minister, Mohammed Mazhar Saleh, announced on Tuesday 4 February 2020 that Iraq is still in debt to Kuwait with an amount of seven billion dollars, after he paid 52 billion as a result of the invasion of the previous regime to Kuwait in the nineties of the last century, while he indicated that the agreement with China was launched from The principle of building bridges and reviving the Silk Road.
      Saleh said in a press statement, that China is one of the developed countries in infrastructure, and that the real development in any country can only be achieved with a solid infrastructure.
      He added, that the 100,000 agreed barrels should enter the Development Fund, and then deduct from it the compensation for the Kuwait war, which remains approximately 7 billion dollars, after Iraq paid about 52 billion dollars.
      He pointed out that this agreement was based on the principle of building bridges and reviving the Silk Road, which China seeks to restore in order to bring peace and increase economic development in the world, especially since the countries that lie on the belt line constitute 65 percent of the world's population.
      Follow the obelisk
      http://almasalah.com/ar/news/187312/مسؤول-حكومي-العراق-مازال-مدينا-للكويت-بسبعة-مليارات-دولار
    • By yota691
      Parliamentary Finance: Iraq's debt stood at $ 119 billion and its benefits to the people
      one hour ago Last updated 02:41 PM     BAGHDAD / tomorrow Press: 
      detecting an MP for the parliamentary finance committee, Majida al - Tamimi, that Iraq 's debt stood at $ 119 billion, of which external estimates of $ 80 billion, and the rest is internal debt, noting that the loans go into the pockets of corrupt people and bears interest on the loans. 
      She said Tamimi's "Tomorrow 's Press," that "there are negative indicators on monetary policy as well as non - corrupt accountable , " indicating that " the loans they take Iraq went to the corrupt and the people bear their benefits." 
      She pointed out that " the apparent corruption through lack of investment loans properly and mostly fake and thefts to the pockets of the corrupt , " adding that " the figures that previously borrowed and squandered the money they borrow and their partners today and they have a certain pedigree." 
      She added that "there are a lot of files have been forwarded to the integrity, but there is no deduction for those files and if I stayed in the integrity of the year as possible to escape the corrupt out of Iraq and not be held accountable , " indicating that "Iraq is required payments of up to $ 119 billion, including debt Foreign worth 68 billion to 12 billion but increased by the recent German loan for a total of $ 80 billion. " 
      She explained that "Iraq 's debt to the Gulf countries reached $ 40 billion, including $ 4.6 billion of Kuwait was postponed repaid until 2018 because of financial commitments crisis , " indicating that " the debt is treated and that have not been claimed in the present time amounted to 40 billion dollars." 
      She stressed that "these figures were taken by the General Director of the debt after a request made by the knowledge of Iraq 's debt , " adding that "there is an internal debt of the government borrowed from the Central Bank, as well as bonds and debt peasants and others."
    • By Alexis John
      BoE cut its benchmark interest rate to a new low and said it would buy government and corporate bonds as part of easing efforts to counter the economic impact of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union. Is this step going to help Britain
    • By Theseus
      Iraq's about to plunge off a fiscal cliff — and the consequences could be dire
       
      From Business Insider
       
      The plunge in oil prices is already having far-reaching effects on countries whose economies are dependent on oil exports.
      But in Iraq, the stakes of cheap oil are even higher than in Saudi Arabia, which is instituting unprecedented taxation and austerity, or in Nigeria, which isnow asking for an $11 billionWorld Bank loan.
      What little remains of Iraq's government and social order might collapse if oil remains in its current price trough — with dire consequences.
      According to a Monday AFP report, Iraq is now selling oil at half of the country's apparent fiscal break-even price. Right now, Iraq is selling its oil at around $22 a barrel, half of what it would need to fetch for the country to be able to fund the upcoming year of government budgetary obligations, the report said. 
      United Nations Joint Analysis UnitIraqi government revenue by year, divided by oil and non-oil sources.
        But Iraq's situation is actually even worse. As recently as the 2014 fiscal year, Iraq was formulating its national budget on the assumption that oil would remain at around $90 a barrel and that the country's oil exports would continue to climb (which they have).
      Iraqi government revenue experienced dramatic annual increases between 2009 and 2013, almost entirely because of oil (see the chart on the left). That's all over, now that oil is expected to stay under $40 a barrel through the end of the year.
      Though Iraqi oil is comparatively cheap to extract, it also contains unusually high levels of sulfur, meaning that it typically sells for around 10% less than Brent crude, the global price benchmark. The Iraqi government is still making money pumping oil — just not nearly enough to fund the country's anticipated national budget.
      Such a daunting fiscal cliff would be challenging for a stable or politically coherent country. But it's potentially disastrous in a place like Iraq, where the majority of territory is split between the terrorist group ISIS and the Kurdistan Regional Government. Even the areas still under some semblance of federal control are fought over by a constellation of militia groups with ties to recognized political parties.
      Ali Khedery, the CEO of Dubai-based Dragoman Partners, a former adviser to US Central Command, and a former Exxon executive with extensive on-the-ground experience in Iraq, warned that cheap oil threatens the country's last remaining semblance of order. 
      "You are looking at a significant possibility of state collapse due to civil unrest," he told Business Insider.
      RNGS ReutersTerritorial control of Iraq as of January 22nd, 2016. ISF refers to the Iraqi Security Forces, the state's official uniform military.
       
      Cheap oil will eat into the Iraqi state's ability to continue fighting ISIS, which still controls Mosul, the country's second-largest city. And it could have an alarming effect on the patronage, corruption, and militancy that buoys the already dysfunctional Iraqi state.
      As Khedery explained to Business Insider, the number of Iraqi government employees is believed to have shot up from around 850,000 at the time of the US-led invasion in 2003 to more than 2.5 million by early 2015. It's a revealing statistic, considering Iraq's transition from a strong, centralized state under Saddam Hussein to a loose and often-violent federation under its current system.
      Khedery said that people were added to government rolls because of family, sectarian, or tribal connections. Some officials would pocket money through "ghost job" scams, embezzling salaries from employees that didn't actually exist. Some of the government's oil revenues would go towards militias with ties to official Iraqi political parties — organizations like the powerful Badr Group.
      "Why did the number of government employees go up 200%? The reason is that Iraq is a kleptocracy built on systemic corruption and patronage as a means of buying votes," Khedery told Business Insider.
      As a result, Iraq has little ability to hedge against against a plunge in oil prices.
      "Unlike Russia or Saudi, which have hundreds of billions in hard currency reserves and trillions in assets and state owned entities, Iraq is insolvent and bankrupt," he said.
      In a price crunch, Saudi Arabia has the option of selling off chunks of Saudi Aramco, itsperhaps multi-trillion-dollar state oil concern — which is exactly what Riyadh is reportedly planning on doing.
      Russia is a major gas exporter, and has a more-diversified economy than many other rentier states. Iraq, on the other hand, has little to show for the nearly half-trillion dollars in oil-export revenue the country received just in the decade after the 2003 invasion. It's largely been stolen, or dispensed to militia groups.
      The Brookings InstitutionIraq's oil export revenues in the decade after the 2003 US-led invasion of the country.
       
      As Khedery explained, an Iraqi "hard landing" has some alarming ramifications.
      A plunge in federal revenue would only harden the division between Baghdad-administered Iraq and the Kurdistan Regional Government, which already has is own oil ministry, government, and security apparatus, and which sells more than 600,000 barrels of oil a day independently of Baghdad.
      In addition to hastening the country's breakup, a budget plunge would also badly destabilize Basra, the southern export point for the vast majority of Iraq's oil.
      The city has already seen increases in violence between Shi'ite militia groups that the federal government has been unable to disarm. Once organizations like Khataib Hezbollah, Jaysh al-Mahdi, and Asaib Ahl al-Haq see their bottom line threatened, the city on which much of the Iraqi economy is dependent could begin to erupt.
      "The militias are going to start turning on the state, and they're going to start turning on each other," Khedery told Business Insider. "They're basically vultures who feasted on ethno-sectarian hatreds and high oil prices and patronage. And now they're going to have to start fighting each other for the scraps as the oil-funded pie has shrunk by more than 80%."
         
    • By TrinityeXchange
      hello again my friends.  its your bud here with another   worth of a take on what i see happening within the borders called iraq.  and it is really good news from my vantage point!  the topic of this opinion piece is the '6 major factors that influence an exchange rate'.  i will cover each factor briefly in reference to iraq and hope to derive whether or not those invested are either in a good or bad position. 
       
      as many know, the importance of an exchange rate revolves around one country's trading relationships with other nations.  trade relationships is the sole purpose of an exchange rate.  where there is no international trade, an exchange rate tied to a currency has no domestic significance.  with this in mind lets peer into the 6 factors of exchange rate influence between iraq and its trading partners.
       
      1) Inflation - iraq has done a fantastic job steering its inflation rate.  the latest report (aug 2015) has inflation at 2.2%.  some economists would mark this as the ideal inflation rate.  this places iraq is a great position with trading partners for determining a strong exchange rate to the iqd.
       
      2) Interest Rates - iraq has maintained a steady interest rate of 6% over the last 5 years.  compared to other nations, it is a phenomenal rate.  the importance here is the attractiveness it has to foreign investors.  should iraq sure up the security situation with daesh and clean up political corruption, foreign investors might feel confident enough to pour funds into iraq at these rates.
       
      3) Current-Account - iraq has done quite well between trading partners and has held a positive current account balance (exports vs imports) over the previous 9 years except for 2010.  oil is its primary export and it has been strong enough a commodity to keep iraq experiencing gains in its current accounts.  as iraq build its non-oil sector through the plan for increased industry and agriculture, exports should increase and it will be reflected in the current account.  
       
      4) Public Debt - this is where the hidden gem is revealed and the reason for the title of my opinion piece.  everything in the papers speak to iraq's "deficit financing".  however for some reason it appears to be seen in a negative light.  my opinion is much different.  not all debt is good but in this instant i definitely believe it is.  when most developing nations look to expand its economic markets as iraq is doing, there will be an inevitable deficit to fiscal policy (the budget).  in the short term, this is a very very good thing!  where most under developed nations utilize deficit financing for payment of domestic and foreign loans, this does not hold true for iraq.  iraq is using this tool as developed nations would, for capital formation for economic growth and boosting the private sector.  this type of debt is the best stimulate for the economy in the short term.  (here is a good slide-show presentation explaining deficit financing.)
       
      5)  Terms of Trade - balance of trade for iraq is simply outstanding and last reported at approximately $40B usd ($44B previous year).  compared to turkey (-$6B usd), japan (-$268B yen), germany $24B eur.  i would say that iraq comparatively has a case for a strong dinar.  its current accounts and balance of trades are unbeatable (maybe a little exaggeration there).
       
      6) Political Stability & Economic Performance - well, you can't shine everywhere  .  unfortunately this important piece is dragging iraq down.....and i mean wayyyyyyyy down.  nobody in their right mind want to stick hundreds of millions in an environment like this.  this area alone is holding iraq back the most.  all things considered, if this one area is corrected there is no reason why foreign investment wont flood the country and the domestic currency surge in demand.  
       
      there you have it gang.  hopefully this piece wasn't too long.  this should give us all a solid overview of the factors that influence the dinars TRUE exchange rate the most.  from it we should be able to make a sound judgement on where the currency is headed and whether or not we want to remain involved. 
       
      be blessed!  
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