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krome2ez

PINK SLIME in Your Kids School Lunches

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Originally published Thursday, March 8, 2012 at 10:05 PM

Treated beef dubbed 'pink slime' to show up in school lunches
A new report in the Daily tablet newspaper indicates that 7 million pounds of "pink slime" will be served in school lunches this spring.

By Elizabeth Flock

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — When McDonald's and other fast-food chains said last month that "pink slime" was no longer being used in their burgers, some believed the product, beef trimmings partially treated with ammonium hydroxide, had disappeared from the nation's food supply once and for all.

But a new report in the Daily tablet newspaper suggests the slime will appear in school lunches this spring, 7 million pounds of it.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), schools and school districts plan to buy the treated meat from Beef Products Inc. (BPI) for the national school-lunch program in coming months.

The USDA said all of its ground-beef purchases "meet the highest standard for food safety." The department also said it strengthened ground-beef safety standards in recent years.

Last April, British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver reported that 70 percent of U.S. ground beef is made with BPI's ammonia-treated product.

BPI recently said that figure still holds. The company called ammonium hydroxide a "natural compound ... widely used in the processing of numerous foods."

Gerald Zirnstein, a former microbiologist at the federal Food Safety Inspection Service, came up with the term "pink slime" when he toured a BPI facility in 2002 during an investigation of salmonella in packaged ground beef. The mixture of animal trimmings and ammonia has a pink appearance.

Zirnstein emailed his colleagues to say he did not "consider the stuff to be ground beef," according to the Daily.

Change.org has a petition on its site asking the USDA to stop buying the slime.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service, however, say ammonium hydroxide is "generally recognized as safe."

The ammonium treatment was initially touted as capable of killing E. coli and salmonella in meat.

But a 2009 New York Times report said the process didn't seem to be working: Government and industry records obtained by the newspaper showed that in testing for the school-lunch program, E. coli and salmonella pathogens had been found dozens of times in Beef Products meat.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/foodwine/2017703057_pinkslime09.html
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Krome.. some may think this absurd.. but if you saw the link I saw that exposed what McD's chicken nuggets were made of you would see this is not far fetched at all. Truly what is in the food supply? Dang.. we aren't too far off from Soy-lent Green! ohmy.gif (Sorry, I don't think I have that link any more, it made me never want to order chicken nuggets again though). dry.gif (I put a "smirk" emoticon only because there isn't a "puking" face!) wink.gif

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Krome.. some may think this absurd.. but if you saw the link I saw that exposed what McD's chicken nuggets were made of you would see this is not far fetched at all. Truly what is in the food supply? Dang.. we aren't too far off from Soy-lent Green! ohmy.gif (Sorry, I don't think I have that link any more, it made me never want to order chicken nuggets again though). dry.gif (I put a "smirk" emoticon only because there isn't a "puking" face!) wink.gif

:lol::lol:

Maybe we can ask Adam for a puking emoticon.

It is sick though what is fed to us as "food."

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Have you watched the movie... "Food, Inc."? I have been in a meeting conducted by Joel Salatine of Polyface Farms, who was featured in a positive light in that film (Link: http://www.polyfacefarms.com/ )... he offers a good reasonable alternative to reintroducing "real" food into our systems again. wink.gif

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Hi RodandStaff,

I've been looking for a company that will ship, do you know if polyface does? I know once I get to Germany, I may not get the chance to get real healthy beef & chicken without chemicals? (not sure, never been) What can I look for or do for now? Your help is GREATLY appreciated!

Have you watched the movie... "Food, Inc."? I have been in a meeting conducted by Joel Salatine of Polyface Farms, who was featured in a positive light in that film (Link: http://www.polyfacefarms.com/ )... he offers a good reasonable alternative to reintroducing "real" food into our systems again. wink.gif

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Hi RodandStaff,

I've been looking for a company that will ship, do you know if polyface does? I know once I get to Germany, I may not get the chance to get real healthy beef & chicken without chemicals? (not sure, never been) What can I look for or do for now? Your help is GREATLY appreciated!

Wow... good question genique. The one thing that Joel Salatin said when I have heard him speak is that he is a huge proponent of locally grown food (meat, veggies, etc...). If I am remember correctly he recommends buying our food from local growers no farther than a 75 mile radius. This ensures the maximum of health benefits from our food. One thing he does say... pay a visit to your local farmer, or meet with them and don't be afraid to ask questions, and get referals.... that is your best chance to know what is in your food, and what, if anything has been used in growing it, as well as the reputation of the farmer.

Can I ask how long you will be in Germany? If you are going to be there for a while check out the local farmer markets... and if speak the language ask questions, or get referrals from the locals that you can converse with. There are ways to ship food but that gets pretty pricey... so not sure what your budget can afford, and how long you plan on being there?? Hope that helps a wee bit. Take care! wink.gif

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food manipulation is everywhere. Have you seen the size of chicken breasts sold in your local supermarket? They're huge! Normal chickens aren't that big. Hormones, antibiotics, there's no telling what you are consuming. I swear, if you ever tour a chicken processing plant, you would never eat chicken again, because nothing goes to waste. If they can't sell it, it's ground up and fed back to the chickens. I'm talking feathers, feet, EVERYTHING, nothing goes to waste. :(

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Just one more reason not to let my kid darken the door of a public school.

Did you know they removed potatoes from WIC and from school lunches?

Yeah. Let's eliminate REAL food and use plasticized crap.

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food manipulation is everywhere. Have you seen the size of chicken breasts sold in your local supermarket? They're huge! Normal chickens aren't that big. Hormones, antibiotics, there's no telling what you are consuming. I swear, if you ever tour a chicken processing plant, you would never eat chicken again, because nothing goes to waste. If they can't sell it, it's ground up and fed back to the chickens. I'm talking feathers, feet, EVERYTHING, nothing goes to waste. :(

Where is that pucking emoticon??? Is this close enough? --->ohmy.gif +1 even though you made me lose my dinner! rolleyes.gif

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Where is that pucking emoticon??? Is this close enough? --->ohmy.gif +1 even though you made me lose my dinner! rolleyes.gif

No kidding. The sad thing is I had a fried chicken salad today for lunch! I conveniently forget about my tour when I"m eating. OMG, it was disgusting.

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food manipulation is everywhere. Have you seen the size of chicken breasts sold in your local supermarket? They're huge! Normal chickens aren't that big. Hormones, antibiotics, there's no telling what you are consuming. I swear, if you ever tour a chicken processing plant, you would never eat chicken again, because nothing goes to waste. If they can't sell it, it's ground up and fed back to the chickens. I'm talking feathers, feet, EVERYTHING, nothing goes to waste. :(

There are also the theories that the reasons that young women are developing at earlier and earlier ages over the past few decades are a direct result of the steroids introduced to livestock to increase their mass, then slaughtered and consumed by children (and others)... Can't say there is much of a reason to necessarily disagree with that hypothesis at this point...

Edited by HopefulTxn
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There are also the theories that the reasons that young women are developing at earlier and earlier ages over the past few decades are a direct result of the steroids introduced to livestock to increase their mass, then slaughtered and consumed by children (and others)... Can't say there is much of a reason to necessarily disagree with that hypothesis at this point...

And don't forget Hopeful... a very touchy subject, but young boys are victims too. Many young boys are developing what is being dubbed "man boobs".... all because of hormones... and yes, I joke around a lot... but this is a sad, serious matter. sad.gif Best to eat home grown chicken if possible, if not, then from a local grower who doesn't rush nature the way it was intended.

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Wow... good question genique. The one thing that Joel Salatin said when I have heard him speak is that he is a huge proponent of locally grown food (meat, veggies, etc...). If I am remember correctly he recommends buying our food from local growers no farther than a 75 mile radius. This ensures the maximum of health benefits from our food. One thing he does say... pay a visit to your local farmer, or meet with them and don't be afraid to ask questions, and get referals.... that is your best chance to know what is in your food, and what, if anything has been used in growing it, as well as the reputation of the farmer.

Can I ask how long you will be in Germany? If you are going to be there for a while check out the local farmer markets... and if speak the language ask questions, or get referrals from the locals that you can converse with. There are ways to ship food but that gets pretty pricey... so not sure what your budget can afford, and how long you plan on being there?? Hope that helps a wee bit. Take care! wink.gif

Thanks for the tips :D I'll be there for three years and currently studying the language now. Do you know anything about Jewish Butcher Shops? I heard they are very good? I buy Hebrew National Beef Hotdogs. Thanks again, I never knew what mile radius to start with.

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I'm ready to turn over a new leaf.

Does anyone have any more tips, short of giving up meat, that will help us choose our food more wisely?

I've read that sodium nitrate (found in processed meats like hotdogs and lunch meat) is a cancer-causing carcinogens. It should be listed on the label and avoided like the plague.

Edited by 40oz
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I'm ready to turn over a new leaf.

Does anyone have any more tips, short of giving up meat, that will help us choose our food more wisely?

I've read that sodium nitrate (found in processed meats like hotdogs and lunch meat) is a cancer-causing carcinogens. It should be listed on the label and avoided like the plague.

I would highly recommend a local CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) to everyone. You can meet the growers... connect with them... and order weekly your meat, and vegetables to fit your needs. Here is a link: http://www.localharvest.org/csa/ . I hope ya'll are fortunate enough to live close enough to a local grower so that you can participate. wink.gif

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I would highly recommend a local CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) to everyone. You can meet the growers... connect with them... and order weekly your meat, and vegetables to fit your needs. Here is a link: http://www.localharvest.org/csa/ . I hope ya'll are fortunate enough to live close enough to a local grower so that you can participate. wink.gif

After the RV,

I'm moving off the "grid,"

and be my own local grower. :)

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I recommend everyone start by watching the movie "Food, Inc."

Eat only the following:

Grass fed beef (purchase Angus beef it's better)

Wild caught cold water fish, nothing ever farm raised (you might as well serve yourself a plate of antibiotics and fish feces)

Locally grown organic produce and if it's available raw milk products and local eggs.

Stay away from all processed foods, when you shop in a grocery store stay on the outer perimeter where all of the fresh food is. Aisles are where a majority of the garbage is.

Sticker shock for pricing on natural foods is offset by the portion size that you will become accustomed to. I'm not a girly man but consider this. I use to put down a 12 ounce steak with no problems, now that I eat grass fed my typical serving is 4-6 ounces. You become more quickly satiated when you eat good food. FYI, grass fed beef typically cooks in one third the time of commercially processed beef.

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I recommend everyone start by watching the movie "Food, Inc."

Eat only the following:

Grass fed beef (purchase Angus beef it's better)

Wild caught cold water fish, nothing ever farm raised (you might as well serve yourself a plate of antibiotics and fish feces)

Locally grown organic produce and if it's available raw milk products and local eggs.

Stay away from all processed foods, when you shop in a grocery store stay on the outer perimeter where all of the fresh food is. Aisles are where a majority of the garbage is.

Sticker shock for pricing on natural foods is offset by the portion size that you will become accustomed to. I'm not a girly man but consider this. I use to put down a 12 ounce steak with no problems, now that I eat grass fed my typical serving is 4-6 ounces. You become more quickly satiated when you eat good food. FYI, grass fed beef typically cooks in one third the time of commercially processed beef.

Yeah... "what he said"!!! wink.gif Thanks for the input usndiver! tip_hat.gifAnd for your information... good food is never "out of style", in fact... it's mighty tasty!!! eyebrows.gif

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I'm ready to turn over a new leaf.

Does anyone have any more tips, short of giving up meat, that will help us choose our food more wisely?

I've read that sodium nitrate (found in processed meats like hotdogs and lunch meat) is a cancer-causing carcinogens. It should be listed on the label and avoided like the plague.

Shoot your own 40oz, I know most of us don't have that option and most of us think a Hamburger comes from the Grocery Store. I pack my kids a lunch everyday, it's a pain but it's not "pink slime"

food manipulation is everywhere. Have you seen the size of chicken breasts sold in your local supermarket? They're huge! Normal chickens aren't that big. Hormones, antibiotics, there's no telling what you are consuming. I swear, if you ever tour a chicken processing plant, you would never eat chicken again, because nothing goes to waste. If they can't sell it, it's ground up and fed back to the chickens. I'm talking feathers, feet, EVERYTHING, nothing goes to waste. :(

your right WorkerBee, I don't know what their feeding those things. I've got chickens and I ate a Rooster not long ago. This was a big bird but there wasn't that much meat on him. The chicken breast your buying in the store must come off of chickens the size of Turkeys. We buy a lot of chicken because my chickens are all layers. I've got three roosters though and two of them got to go because their scalping the hens and they eat too much but a least they don't glow in the dark.

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There are also the theories that the reasons that young women are developing at earlier and earlier ages over the past few decades are a direct result of the steroids introduced to livestock to increase their mass, then slaughtered and consumed by children (and others)... Can't say there is much of a reason to necessarily disagree with that hypothesis at this point...

And I'm so proud to say that my daughter is almost 13 and hasn't started menstruating yet! :) I did something right!!! (I started at 11...) Oh yeah...TMI... :lol:

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