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bostonangler

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Everything posted by bostonangler

  1. Rich people are hoarding cash, and wealth managers are getting frustrated A friend of mine has relatives in Germany who converted some of their not insubstantial family wealth into gold bars and buried them in the woods of Bavaria. This was at a time before negative interest rates so was not a reaction to today’s uncertain global economy, rather mistrust of the financial system in general. Yet it highlights a propensity on the part of the wealthy to hoard that is increasingly frustrating wealth managers.High-net worth individuals (HNWIs) — people with at least $1m in investable assets — are increasingly shunning equities. In the first quarter of this year, HNWIs held nearly 28 per cent of their portfolios on average in cash, according to the Capgemini World Wealth report. A year previously, that figure was 27.2 per cent.Overall cash holdings of clients at UBS, the largest wealth manager in the world, are now 26 per cent, according to its quarterly investor sentiment survey — up from 25 per cent at the start of the year. Credit Suisse’s chief executive Tidjane Thiam told analysts in July that clients were holding 29 per cent in cash — albeit a slight dip from 30 per cent at the start of 2019. Wealth managers say the uncertain environment for the global economy and the outlook for equities are why clients are keeping their powder dry. More recently, fears over the trade war between the US and China have led some investors to increase their cash holdings: a third of investors in UBS’s quarterly survey thought the skirmishes could last a year or longer, and while 45 per cent thought diversifying their portfolio was the best solution to a prolonged trade war, 37 per cent said holding cash was the answer.Wealth managers do not like this trend, for understandable business reasons. Swiss banks in particular, where interest rates are negative at -0.75 per cent, have been passing on these rates to clients with high cash balances. Credit Suisse and UBS had held fire, but recently said they would have to start passing them on, too. If rich people do more with their money — investing in private equity or other alternative assets, buying property or even regularly trading equities, for example — wealth managers make more money from them. 3.9% The fall in the number of ultra-HNWIs around the world in 2018 To give them their due, it is not all about their bottom line. Some wealth managers are genuinely frustrated that clients think cash is the safest bet in a world of negative interest rates. “In some ways it is heartbreaking to think about how much the markets have moved since the financial crisis,” UBS chief investment officer Mark Haefele told me recently, referring to investors who have stayed on the sidelines and missed out on the great bull run in equities.Yet perception of risk is an emotional thing. If people feel comfortable paying extra money in the form of negative rates for the known loss they will suffer on cash versus the unknown and potentially larger loss on riskier assets, it can be hard for wealth managers to talk them out of it. At least, unlike gold bars buried in the ground, finding where their money is will not be a problem, so in that respect the cash-rich could be doing worse in terms of portfolio protection. Wealth managers may need to respect that.Capgemini Global HNW Insights surveyOnly 44% of HNWIs interviews for the 2019 Capgemini Global HNW Insights survey said they connected ‘very well’ with their wealth managers“My wealth manager does not know me well personally”28% cited their adviser’s lack of emotional intelligence as the reason they did not connect well“My wealth manager uses too much technical lexicon that is difficult to understand” https://finance.yahoo.com/m/761aba26-568f-3605-8c63-bd92b83694b9/rich-people-are-hoarding.html B/A
  2. I'm not sure why you feel compelled to label me as a liberal. I have stated many times I do not support any one side. I vote for the person and have voted, republican, democrat and independent. The news I bring in, is simply the stories of the day. I don't write them and I don't always subscribe to them. I just think it is important for people to read fact based news as apposed to opinion. You and I are not far apart on many issues, but we are miles apart on our president. You are willing to overlook his lies, misrepresentations, bad hires and his never ending efforts to isolate our country from the globe. I am not willing to overlook and accept those things... I just don't believe he is good for America. As for issues, I think you and I are very much aligned. B/A
  3. I'm only afraid for others... I don't think a lot of people are proactive to changing times. That's why I bring news here. In the hope someone will see it and it helps them. I don't bring idiotic tweets of cesspool dwellers who post fear mongering junk theories. B/A
  4. That everyone is afraid, just like the politicians want you to be. Every day I read how there is an evil plot to take over the world. Rhetoric runs amuck. People need to realize what fear factor is and how it is being used. B/A
  5. Do people not understand everything is according to God's plan? Like Obama, or Bush or Trump or anyone else. So God wanted Obama to safe America from hate and racism. Now he wants to punish America so he chooses Trump to destroy our economy... Does anyone know what the plan really is? The short answer is NOPE... So if anyone tells you they know God's plan they are a liar and a con. JMHO B/A
  6. And you guys thought I was crazy with my conspiracy theory.... LOL There is nothing this greedy guy won't do. George Conway Says Trump Illegally Manipulated Market With China Phone Call Tale White House counselor Kellyanne Conway’s husband, lawyer George Conway, has accused President Donald Trump of illegally manipulating financial markets with his suspect claim that there were “numerous” calls from “high-level” Chinese officials to the U.S. last weekend to restart trade talks. Conway, a conservative legal expert, was reacting to numerous indications that the calls didn’t happen and that Trump made up the claim. China has not confirmed that such calls took place. A spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry said after Trump’s announcement Monday that he was “not aware” of any such calls. CNN reported Thursday that Trump “conflated” some kind of communication with the Chinese with a statement at a business forum in China by Chinese Vice Premier Liu He. Two unnamed officials told CNN that Trump “was eager to project optimism that might boost the markets.” World financial markets, which swooned the previous week as Trump intensified his China trade war rhetoric, rebounded after the president’s phone calls announcement. Conway said such “market manipulation” constitutes “criminal violations” of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. “market manipulation” occurs when “someone artificially affects the supply or demand for a security (for example, causing stock prices to rise or to fall dramatically),” according to a fact sheet from the Securities and Exchange Commission. It can involve a “number of techniques to affect the supply of, or demand for, a stock,” including “spreading false or misleading information.” If Trump’s account of the China calls was not accurate, his announcement artificially boosted markets and people profited from it. It’s not clear if political information — or falsehoods — could be considered market manipulation. Trump has also picked out companies — like Amazon — to attack in tweets, affecting stock values. Some observers, including NBC analyst (and former HuffPost global editorial director) Howard Fineman, have wondered whether the president’s associates and relatives are profiting from advance knowledge of Trump’s market-moving tweets. The New York Times reported earlier this year about Trump’s debt-laden businesses — and how he tried to make money in the market. According to the Times, Trump appeared to repeatedly profit in the stock market in the 1980s by presenting himself as a takeover threat by investing in certain companies. After reports of his involvement boosted stock values, he would then unload his investments before others realized there wasn’t going to be deal and pocket the profit. https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/china-phone-calls-market-manipulation-donald-trump-george-conway-kellyanne-conway-112230739.html B/A
  7. cranman I have to say I do feel that we are closer than ever. I sometimes daydream of not having to do the daily grind anymore. When I got involved several people I know did as well and a lot of people laughed at our get rich scheme. As the years passed many of my friends still hold their dinar. Occasionally they will ask if I've heard anything. The people who laughed at us never mention it now and I'm sure they think they have had the last laugh. But as we do get closer and I read the news and the updates of progress I still allow myself to think what if? I do believe opportunity does come knocking and few take the risk. I don't know about being a one percenter, but if this comes out at .10 or more our futures will change dramatically. If it comes out at $1, my dream of quitting the rat race will come true. If it comes out at $3 like some believe.... Well the first 10 rounds are on me!!! Happy Friday B/A
  8. PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump's prized Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida is potentially sitting directly in the path of Hurricane Dorian , which is forecast to become an extremely destructive storm. The resort, which is currently closed for the summer, is on the wealthy barrier island of Palm Beach. During the cooler months, Trump visits the property frequently and has held several high-level meetings there with world leaders. The National Hurricane Center's most recent track for Dorian places Mar-a-Lago in the crosshairs of a possible Category 4 storm with winds of almost 140 mph (225 kph). Still, the resort dates from the 1920s and has seen more than its share of hurricanes in the past. It was originally built by cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, with the main mansion containing 126 rooms. Trump bought the place in 1985, after efforts to make it into a national park did not work out. Since he became president, Trump has hosted leaders such as Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe and China's Xi Jinping at the resort. Hurricanes have always been a part of Mar-a-Lago. In 2005, Trump said he received a $17 million insurance payment for hurricane damage to the resort. But an Associated Press investigation found little evidence of such large-scale damage. At the time, Trump said he didn't know how much had been spent on repairs, but acknowledged he pocketed some of the money. He transferred funds into his personal accounts, saying that under the terms of his policy "you didn't have to reinvest it." "Landscaping, roofing, walls, painting, leaks, artwork in the — you know, the great tapestries, tiles, Spanish tiles, the beach, the erosion," he said of the storm damage. "It's still not what it was." Trump is a climate change skeptic. Meanwhile, local governments across Florida, including in Palm Beach County, are gearing up to deal with rising sea levels and possibly more intense hurricanes. If sea-level rise predictions even at the lower end come true, Mar-a-Lago could have ocean water lapping on its lawns in the not-too-distant future. https://news.yahoo.com/trumps-florida-mar-lago-resort-145748480.html This will be interesting... Click the link and read the comments... Crazy stuff B/A
  9. That's not true... I do not give you rubies daily... I rarely give in to temptation...LOL B/A
  10. China trade war drags consumer sentiment down to the lowest level in four years Consumer sentiment index falls to 89.8, lowest level since 2016 The numbers: A measure of how Americans view the strength of the economy fell to the lowest level in almost four years, reflecting growing worries about the U.S. trade war with China that’s led to higher and higher tariffs. The final consumer sentiment survey fell to 89.8 in August from an early estimate of 92.3 and a 98.4 reading in July, the University of Michigan said Friday. It’s the lowest mark since October 2016. Just a year and a half ago, the index hit 101.4 to mark the highest level since 2004. What happened: The sharp decline in consumer sentiment stemmed from increasingly negative views of the one-third of respondents that brought up the tariffs on their own. They worry the dispute will increase inflation, reduce incomes and raise unemployment. Many Americans still don’t appear to be fazed by the trade fight, however. Another closely followed measure of attitudes known as consumer confidence remained near an 19-high in August. Part of the divergence reflects differences in the surveys. The confidence index tracks more closely with how Americans view their own job security and the strength of the labor market. From that standpoint, the economy is doing pretty good. Layoffs and unemployment are near a 50-year low, incomes are rising and jobs are still plentiful. That’s been enough to extend a more than 10-year-old economic expansion and keep the U.S. out of recession. Read: Consumer spending surges in July, but low inflation paves way for Fed to cut rates The sentiment survey, on the other hand, tends to reflect how Americans view the economy more broadly, including the health of the financial markets. Stocks fell sharply in early August after the trade war with China heated up, though some of the losses have since been recovered. Read: Democrats back $15 minimum wage to draw 2020 election battle lines Big picture: So far the storm clouds precipitated by the trade war with China have not dented consumer confidence enough to threaten the economy, but analysts are watching closely. The sentiment survey certainly adds to the worries. What they are saying? “Trump’s tariff policies have been subject to repeated reversals amid threats of higher future tariffs. Such tactics may have some merit in negotiations with China, but they act to increase uncertainty and diminish consumer spending at home,” said Richard Curtin, chief economist of the sentiment survey. Market reaction: The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +0.18% and the S&P 500 index SPX, +0.04% turned lower in Friday trades. Stocks had surged on Thursday after China said it would hold off a response to the latest increase in U.S. tariffs. The 10-year Treasury yield TMUBMUSD10Y, +1.85% edged up to 1.52%. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/china-trade-war-drags-consumer-sentiment-down-to-the-lowest-level-in-four-years-2019-08-30?siteid=yhoof2&yptr=yahoo Two more years of this guy and there won't be an America... What a business schmuck. B/A
  11. I don't know but this was a very interesting interview... Not many people with his credentials would say these things out loud. B/A
  12. Can people actually understand what this guy is saying? B/A
  13. You reap what you sow..... Farmers go ahead and vote for him again and you'll be moving off your farms and working for Amazon. B/A
  14. China's Tariffs Strike Another Blow to Agricultural Stocks China has threatened to hike tariffs between 5% and 10% on U.S. goods worth $75 billion — the latest escalation in the prolonged trade war between the world’s two largest economies. China would impose additional tariffs of 5% or 10% on a wide range of U.S goods, including agricultural products, in two stages on Sep 1 and Dec 15, 2019. U.S Agriculture Industry Caught in Crossfire The U.S Agriculture industry has been grappling with low commodity prices and sluggish farm incomes. Tariffs imposed by China on U.S. agricultural exports last year dealt a severe blow given that China is the largest export market for U.S. agriculture producers. Per American Farm Bureau, U.S. agricultural exports to China shot up 700% over 2000-2017. However, the trade war led to a 50% plunge in agricultural exports to China to $9.1 billion in 2018. Exports of farm products to China declined by $1.3 billion in the first half of 2019. Per the latest available data, farm bankruptcy filings have gone up 13% in the 12-month period ended June 2019. Also delinquency rates for commercial agricultural loans are at a six-year high. Per the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) latest available projections, net farm is anticipated to increase 10% year over year to $69 billion in 2019. However, it remains well below the high of $123 billion reached in 2013.This has weighed on farmer sentiment, making them more cautious about spending on farm equipment. This has weighed on the Manufacturing - Farm Equipment industry’s top line. Tariffs imposed by the Trump administration last year on steel and aluminum added to equipment manufacturers’ woes by inflating raw-material costs.The Zacks Industry Rank, which is basically the average of the Zacks Rank of all the member stocks, indicates gloomy prospects for the Manufacturing - Farm Equipment industry in the near term. The industry, which is a six stock group within the broader Zacks Industrial Products sector, carries a Zacks Industry Rank #208, which places it at the bottom 19% of 256 Zacks industries. Our research shows that the top 50% of the Zacks-ranked industries outperforms the bottom 50% by a factor of more than 2 to 1.So far this year, stocks in the Manufacturing - Farm Equipment industry have collectively gained 3%, lagging the S&P 500’s growth of 13.5% and its sector’s 5%. Deere & Company DE, one of the major names in the industry, with a market capitalization of $48.4 billion, has cut its fiscal 2019 guidance twice this year citing a weak agricultural sector. Lindsay Corporation LNN, which makes irrigation equipment, has also been impacted by the trade war and weak farmer sentiments.Nevertheless, the USDA’s $16-billion aid for American farmers who have been affected by the trade war will provide some respite. Farm equipment demand will eventually pick up, spurred by the need to replace ageing equipment. Despite the near-term headwinds, the long-term prospects for the industry’s equipment will be fueled by increased global demand for food and efficient water use. Benefits from Precision Agriculture initiatives will help over the long haul.Investors still keen on the industry may consider Kubota Corp. KUBTY, currently sporting a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy), and AGCO Corporation AGCO, carrying a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) at present. https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/chinas-tariffs-strike-another-blow-150503097.html B/A
  15. Umbertino don't be offended by these sad people. They mean no harm they are like the people who watch reality TV... The are looking for someone who has it worse than they do. They find joy in it. How could someone be happy when you know in your heart you support an ongoing train wreck? B/A
  16. Creating a armed service has to be passed by Congress, so there is still a ways to go here. B/A
  17. I agree... But I find it amazing that people aren't bothered by it. Like Biden and his silver star story. I think he is on his way down. He is not a good liar and seems to be confused. I just don't understand why Trump's supporters don't call him out on his lies. The cult thing is weird. It is as if he can do no wrong... So far, I don't see anyone worth my vote come 2020... The republicans know they have problems because Trump is losing ground quickly and the democrats simply have no ideas... B/A
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