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DinarThug

Delta: URGENT FROM IRAQI TV - CBI Printing New Banknotes !

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14 hours ago, new york kevin said:

1000 dinar replaced, 500 dinar replaced, 100 dinar replaced ... 0 = RV time baby.  This coupled with the smaller Islamic Banks successfully going electronic, digital; the creation of deposit insurance for all Iraqi banks wonderful. Electronic payment of salaries and retirement benefits around the corner;  tariffs on imported goods set to start asap. Means there is a even larger amount of pressure on the GOI and CBI to revalue their currency to reflect the true market value.

Now their's the spirit..go RV.

14 hours ago, new york kevin said:

 

 

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It seems logical that they cannot revalue ar 1-1 if the citizens cannot give change.  Until there are LD's like 1, 5, 10's, there would be no RV.        They consider a L D as 100 and 500.   That would make sense if the RV is 1 dinar = .01 cent.    Logical?

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US-led coalition says less than 3k ISIS terrorists still in Iraq, Syria

 

December 05 2017 09:37 PM
 
Breaking
 

US-led coalition fighting ISIS in estimates that fewer than 3,000 fighters belonging to the hardline Sunni militant group remain in Iraq and Syria, the coalition's spokesman Colonel Ryan Dillon tweeted Tuesday.

"Current estimates are that there are less than 3000 #Daesh fighters left - they still remain a threat, but we will continue to support our partner forces to defeat them," Dillon tweeted using an Arabic acronym for ISIS.

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ISIS caliphate toppled in Iraq, Syria. Why isn’t anyone celebrating?

December 06 2017 03:25 PM
 
.
The Washington Post
Every day for more than three years, the U.S.-led coalition bombed ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria, for a total of nearly 30,000 strikes. But on Nov. 26, not a single airstrike was launched.

Just a week earlier, Iraq’s military had won back the last sliver of territory controlled by the militants. The Pentagon has announced that 400 Marines deployed to Syria to fight the group will be returning home.

Those milestones appear to mark ISIS defeat, with the end of its self-declared caliphate. But the battle isn’t over. 

Iraqi and Syrian forces have yet to secure their porous border, which ISIS ministate once spanned, and are still chasing militants in canyon-filled deserts. Nor has the U.S. military determined its role now that major combat is over, although American and Iraqi officials have suggested that a major drawdown of U.S. troops is possible.

Most urgently, Iraq and Syria are girding for a wave of terrorist violence, such as the attack that killed more than 300 people at a mosque in northern Sinai in Egypt in late November.

Iraqi forces are transitioning into policing roles that will call for them to gather intelligence and break up sleeper cells. U.S. forces are assisting by working with police forces and army units tasked with preventing the militants from staging attacks in places they once held, said Col. Ryan Dillon, the spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS.

“We fully expect them to go back to their insurgent roots,” he said.

But the unpredictable politics of Iraq and Syria, and rivalries over territory, could derail counterterrorism efforts.
In Iraq, an elite U.S.-trained counterterrorism force has been drawn into a political and military standoff between the Iraqi government and a Kurdish effort to secede. 

The force’s units were expected to return to their provincial headquarters throughout Iraq as the battle against ISIS wound down. Instead, they have been scattered across northern Iraq to areas disputed by Baghdad and the Kurdistan Regional Government, said Lt. Gen. Sami al-Aridhi, the commander of one of the three divisions of the force.

“This is our new thing,” he said, describing their presence near Kurdish regions.

Resolving the crisis would allow the counterterrorism units to return to their designated role as a bulwark against ISIS attacks, such as one in September that killed more than 80 Shiite pilgrims in southern Iraq. Such assaults underscore the sustained threat posed by ISIS despite its territorial losses.

Securing Iraq’s border with ­Syria and the desert region on both sides is a crucial step toward preventing more bloodshed, military commanders said.

Iraq’s army and allied Shiite militias have cleared about 5,400 square miles of desert in western Iraq, but about that much still must be secured, Iraqi commanders said.

The area includes smuggling routes and militant hideouts that Iraqi forces are reaching for the first time in 14 years, said Maj. Gen. Qassim al-Mohammadi, the commander of western Anbar province operations.

“It was used as a place for the terrorist groups to mobilize and train,” he said. “The biggest challenge facing us now is the large size of the sector. It’s hard to inspect it fully.”

Iraq’s military has been using air power to destroy militant positions in the vast region, which is devoid of civilians. American strikes have not been needed, Dillon said, raising fresh questions about the long-term U.S. role. 

The presence of American forces in Iraq has long rankled Iran-backed Shiite militias, and their leaders have demanded a withdrawal now that ISIS caliphate has been toppled.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has said he expects the American troops to begin drawing down from the peak of 5,200 earlier this year but wants some to stay to continue training Iraqi forces in intelligence gathering and information sharing.

“It’s not in our interest, nor in the interest of other countries in the region, for terrorists to regroup again,” he said in an interview this fall.

Abadi said Iraq would not celebrate victory over ISIS until the militants are routed in the western desert and the border with Syria is sealed.

The outlook in Syria is far murkier. The Trump administration has indicated that American forces could have an open-ended mission there until a political solution to Syria’s war is worked out. That halting process involves Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his Russian and Iranian allies, and U.S.-backed opposition groups. 

Experts and rebel commanders warn that ISIS remains a potent threat in Syria and that the country’s fractured political climate could help the militants regroup.

“Governments like to talk about ISIS in terms of metrics, numbers, cities taken. What we forget is that ISIS is more than a presence on the ground. It is a political force, an ideological force, and it says something about the world that people across Syria and Iraq have been living in,” said Tobias Schneider, an international security analyst, using another name for ISIS. “We are not one step closer to solving those politics.”

As Assad’s government recaptures territory, the most unpopular components of its rule are in place. Tens of thousands of people remain in squalid government jails, and economic inequalities have been sharpened by a war economy that rewards government loyalists as much of the population relies on aid handouts.

“Terrorist groups will not disappear while the conditions that allowed them to flourish are still here,” said Mustafa Sejari, an official with the Pentagon-backed al-Mutasim Brigade, a rebel group fighting ISIS. Now stationed in a Turkish-protected enclave in northern Syria, his group has faced a string of counterattacks over the past year.

The involvement of Iran- and U.S.-backed proxy groups in the war again ISIS in ­Syria could soon pose problems, ­analysts said.

“I think we underestimate the degree to which all of these territories which we say are under the control of central forces are still under control of local forces, and it’s not hard for those to switch sides,” Schneider said. 

That outside forces brought down ISIS should give the United States and its partner force pause as they focus on restoring stability to the areas they have seized, said Nicholas Heras of the Washington-based Center for a New American Security.

“That should be worrying for the U.S. and its partners in Syria because it speaks to the degree to which ISIS can seed its operatives, all local Syrians, into the security and governance structures that are currently being built to replace it,” he said. 

Of particular concern are the parts of eastern Syria where the fighters have set up base.

Heras said that region, which abuts Iraq, “will be a sea of turmoil as ISIS ramps up its insurgency mission over the coming months and years.”

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1 hour ago, King Bean said:

 

                      Maybe take Frank and Delta too......:lol:

 

No!! 

No!!!

No!!!! 

😂😂😂

 

Edited by Markinsa
Removed video | See Forum Rules

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3 hours ago, NEPatriotsFan1 said:

That’s right we can’t unsee that!!!! 

 

I think he unseen it! 🤣🤣🤣😂😂

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So I have an idea. The parts of eastern Syria where Isis is setting up bases, drop a couple MOAB’s on their flea infested camel smellin asses. How about that to subdue them just a little bit more?? Jeez is it really that hard to figure out what to do about them? I say let’s get the entire coalition forces to have one last hurrah and roll into Syria and end these evil bastards once and for all. Nobody will say shiite! If they do, they are isis sympathizers and they become fair game.

Any questions?

PS a week of carpet bombing the entire area should be enough to soften them up a bit. 

Okay I feel better now. Time for a shot of Blantons.

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12-6-2017   Intel/Newshound Guru tman23    THE NEW CURRENCY MUST COME FIRST AND HAVE A RATE BETTER THEN 1184 OR A 25 NOTE IS WORTHLESS...

i CAN SAY THE BANKS IN KURDISTAN ARE ALL COMMUNICATING WITH THE CBI AND FOLLOWING REGULATIONS...

THE ATMS ARE PROGRAMMED TO GIVE OUT USD BUT NOT LOADED YET WITH USD...

OPTION NOT YET ACTIVATED...

WHICH TELLS ME IT WILL BE CLOSE TO 1-1 THE NEW LD TO THE USD.

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14 minutes ago, DinarThug said:

12-6-2017   Intel/Newshound Guru tman23    THE NEW CURRENCY MUST COME FIRST AND HAVE A RATE BETTER THEN 1184 OR A 25 NOTE IS WORTHLESS...

i CAN SAY THE BANKS IN KURDISTAN ARE ALL COMMUNICATING WITH THE CBI AND FOLLOWING REGULATIONS...

THE ATMS ARE PROGRAMMED TO GIVE OUT USD BUT NOT LOADED YET WITH USD...

OPTION NOT YET ACTIVATED...

WHICH TELLS ME IT WILL BE CLOSE TO 1-1 THE NEW LD TO THE USD.

 

552bea17e858486153674ee084413832--emoji-emoticons-emojis.jpg

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On 12/5/2017 at 4:17 PM, DinarThug said:

12-5-2017   Newshound Guru Kaperoni   ...it is published both on the CBI and in IMF docs that 44 trillon is in circulation

There is only one solution...

Reduce the physical paper and gradually raise the value via float...

the dinar will float with a plan to equal $1.  

Its in print.  

You remove the larger 3 zero notes and introduce new smaller notes over time.

This process deletes the zeros and raises the value

Latest economist article:  

"Today, we find it easy in front of the Central Bank of Iraq to work 

to the principle of reducing the exchange rate gradually to the extent that it can be equivalent to the dinar against the dollar...  

Iraq is not a candidate to LOP the Dinar... 

they have less than 2% inflation... maintained the peg.  

LOPs happen when monetary policy fails.

 

 

 

Im sorry but i have to comment on this. Does kaperoni realize that in order to float they have to have way more in reserves than they do, because they have to control the supply and demand in the market and they can only do that by using their reserves? Last time i saw something on the reserves they were at like 43 billion usd. The usd and the iqd i do believe will be in the same basket which basically means they will continue their peg. Just like saudi arabia and other gulf countries that are pegged to the dollar. This float theory has only come from economists and i have seen nothing from the cbi stating that it would be gradual. I have seen shabibi in the past state that it would be fixed and would happen suddenly. True that shabbs is no longer their but the imf worked with him for years and i dont see where there would need to be a deviation from the original plan. Shabibi's resume speaks for itself as the leader in macro and micro economics. He knows way more than all the imf and economists in iraq and the world bank combined. I read of the balsam samuellson (sp) affect that kap speaks of and its a theory that can be used in economics with currency but that does not mean that is what will be done here. jmo  ;)

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10 minutes ago, mylilpony said:

 

 

 

Im sorry but i have to comment on this. Does kaperoni realize that in order to float they have to have way more in reserves than they do, because they have to control the supply and demand in the market and they can only do that by using their reserves? Last time i saw something on the reserves they were at like 43 billion usd. The usd and the iqd i do believe will be in the same basket which basically means they will continue their peg. Just like saudi arabia and other gulf countries that are pegged to the dollar. This float theory has only come from economists and i have seen nothing from the cbi stating that it would be gradual. I have seen shabibi in the past state that it would be fixed and would happen suddenly. True that shabbs is no longer their but the imf worked with him for years and i dont see where there would need to be a deviation from the original plan. Shabibi's resume speaks for itself as the leader in macro and micro economics. He knows way more than all the imf and economists in iraq and the world bank combined. I read of the balsam samuellson (sp) affect that kap speaks of and its a theory that can be used in economics with currency but that does not mean that is what will be done here. jmo  ;)

Yes! I believe it will be suddenly and pegged as well! Thanks mylilpony

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58 minutes ago, navira45 said:

I expect to see the rv a month from sat when Abadi announces Iraq free from isis war....second week of jan 2018

 

Luckily That Fits My Schedule - We Should Be Just About Recovered From New Years Eve To Start Celebrating Again ! :cheesehead: 

 

:D  :D  :D 

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3 hours ago, navira45 said:

I expect to see the rv a month from sat when Abadi announces Iraq free from isis war....second week of jan 2018

 

Happy birthday to me. :macarena:

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8 hours ago, DinarThug said:

 

Luckily That Fits My Schedule - We Should Be Just About Recovered From New Years Eve To Start Celebrating Again ! :cheesehead: 

 

:D  :D  :D 

Hanging out with the possum for New Years eh?

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On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 3:20 PM, DinarThug said:

and as soon as Abadi  makes that speech [Guru] Walkingstick will disappear because  in his words…“all hell will break loose”. 

 

Woops. Guess my sumo wrestler was too offensive. Sorry folks!  :rolleyes:

        I still hope "the stick" disappears with Frank26 and Delta.

      77785176-436d-4f8a-97da-8fae3abfc0b2.gif

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Lets face it, if Trump were not President, what is he known for. FINANCES, MAKING MONEY. Personally, I think we are in a GREAT 

POSITION  the next couple years to see this POP. What a feather in his cap to bring down the debt in this country. JMO and thinking 

OUT LOUD.

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