Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Devices Said to Use Pressure Cookers Packed With Pellets


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
2 replies to this topic

#1 jonjon

jonjon

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 3,031 posts
  • LocationAthens, Texas

Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:39 PM

Devices Said to Use Pressure Cookers Packed With Pellets

 

20130417_Boston_hp-slide-K0M3-moth_516d9

BOSTON — The explosives used to kill three people and injure 176 at the Boston Marathon on Monday were likely some kind of “pressure-cooker” devices that sent sharp bits of shrapnel flying into victims in the vicinity of the blast, several law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Surgeons at several Boston hospitals told televised news conferences on Tuesday that the explosive devices had apparently been packed with small pellets and sharp “nail-like” objects that were designed to maim their victims.

The new details about the explosives emerged as President Obama announced at the White House that the F.B.I. was investigating the attack as “an act of terrorism,” but said that it was unclear if it had been carried out by an individual or a group, foreign or domestic.

Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who heads the House Homeland Security Committee, said the authorities believe that the explosives were similar to improvised explosive devices that have been used against American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. McCaul, a former federal prosecutor who received briefings Tuesday morning from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Homeland Security officials, also said that the authorities still did not know whether the attack was a foreign or domestic plot.

A law enforcement official said at least one and probably both of the bombs were pressure cookers filed with nails and ball bearings and black powder that were detonated with rudimentary “kitchen-type” timers. The official said investigators believe the bombs were hidden inside bags or backpacks and left on the street or sidewalk near the finish line.

A senior government official who had spoken with intelligence and law enforcement officials said Tuesday that there had been “no pre-attack chatter” detected by the government from members of Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups. In two intelligence briefings the official said he had received in recent weeks, there was “nothing was offered on this” type of attack.

The official said that the intelligence agencies had begun to go back and examine communications they intercepted in recent weeks to determine whether they had missed anything. “Before the 2009 Christmas Day bombing attempt, they thought there was no pre-attack chatter,” said the official. “But there had been, but it had not been interpreted. Everything is now being looked at.”

Along with having few investigative leads, the official said that the investigation had been hampered, in part, by the fact that no terrorist group had claimed responsibility for the attack. Such a claim of responsibility, the official said, would help investigators as they try and weed out suspects.

Rudimentary explosive devices made from pressure cookers have been widely used in attacks in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, all countries where the cooking device is common, according to a Department of Homeland Security warning notice issued in 2010. But they have occasionally turned up in attacks in the United States as well: Faisal Shahzad, an American citizen who tried a car-bomb attack on Times Square in 2010, included a pressure cooker loaded with 120 firecrackers in the collection of jury-rigged explosives in his vehicle. The devices smoked but never exploded.

Law-enforcement officials urged the public on Tuesday to share any video or photographs they had taken of the marathon or the blast.

F.B.I. agents, Boston police detectives, the state police and investigators from other agencies assigned to Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were being assisted by an F.B.I. Evidence Recovery Team from New York and F.B.I. specialists from the bureau’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., who are expert in the handling of videos and photographs, a law enforcement official said.

“There is a tremendous volume of images that are being evaluated,” the official said.

Katharine Q. Seelye reported from Boston, and Michael Cooper from New York. Reporting was contributed by John Eligon and Jess Bidgood from Boston, Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum and Mary Pilon from New York, and Mark Landler, and Michael S. Schmidt, Eric Schmitt and Abby Goodnough from Washington.

BOSTON — The explosives used to kill three people and injure 176 at the Boston Marathon on Monday were likely some kind of “pressure-cooker” devices that sent sharp bits of shrapnel flying into victims in the vicinity of the blast, several law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Surgeons at several Boston hospitals told televised news conferences on Tuesday that the explosive devices had apparently been packed with small pellets and sharp “nail-like” objects that were designed to maim their victims.

The new details about the explosives emerged as President Obama announced at the White House that the F.B.I. was investigating the attack as “an act of terrorism,” but said that it was unclear if it had been carried out by an individual or a group, foreign or domestic.

Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who heads the House Homeland Security Committee, said the authorities believe that the explosives were similar to improvised explosive devices that have been used against American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. McCaul, a former federal prosecutor who received briefings Tuesday morning from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Homeland Security officials, also said that the authorities still did not know whether the attack was a foreign or domestic plot.

A law enforcement official said at least one and probably both of the bombs were pressure cookers filed with nails and ball bearings and black powder that were detonated with rudimentary “kitchen-type” timers. The official said investigators believe the bombs were hidden inside bags or backpacks and left on the street or sidewalk near the finish line.

A senior government official who had spoken with intelligence and law enforcement officials said Tuesday that there had been “no pre-attack chatter” detected by the government from members of Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups. In two intelligence briefings the official said he had received in recent weeks, there was “nothing was offered on this” type of attack.

The official said that the intelligence agencies had begun to go back and examine communications they intercepted in recent weeks to determine whether they had missed anything. “Before the 2009 Christmas Day bombing attempt, they thought there was no pre-attack chatter,” said the official. “But there had been, but it had not been interpreted. Everything is now being looked at.”

Along with having few investigative leads, the official said that the investigation had been hampered, in part, by the fact that no terrorist group had claimed responsibility for the attack. Such a claim of responsibility, the official said, would help investigators as they try and weed out suspects.

Rudimentary explosive devices made from pressure cookers have been widely used in attacks in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, all countries where the cooking device is common, according to a Department of Homeland Security warning notice issued in 2010. But they have occasionally turned up in attacks in the United States as well: Faisal Shahzad, an American citizen who tried a car-bomb attack on Times Square in 2010, included a pressure cooker loaded with 120 firecrackers in the collection of jury-rigged explosives in his vehicle. The devices smoked but never exploded.

Law-enforcement officials urged the public on Tuesday to share any video or photographs they had taken of the marathon or the blast.

F.B.I. agents, Boston police detectives, the state police and investigators from other agencies assigned to Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were being assisted by an F.B.I. Evidence Recovery Team from New York and F.B.I. specialists from the bureau’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., who are expert in the handling of videos and photographs, a law enforcement official said.

“There is a tremendous volume of images that are being evaluated,” the official said.

Katharine Q. Seelye reported from Boston, and Michael Cooper from New York. Reporting was contributed by John Eligon and Jess Bidgood from Boston, Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum and Mary Pilon from New York, and Mark Landler, and Michael S. Schmidt, Eric Schmitt and Abby Goodnough from Washington.

BOSTON — The explosives used to kill three people and injure 176 at the Boston Marathon on Monday were likely some kind of “pressure-cooker” devices that sent sharp bits of shrapnel flying into victims in the vicinity of the blast, several law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Surgeons at several Boston hospitals told televised news conferences on Tuesday that the explosive devices had apparently been packed with small pellets and sharp “nail-like” objects that were designed to maim their victims.

The new details about the explosives emerged as President Obama announced at the White House that the F.B.I. was investigating the attack as “an act of terrorism,” but said that it was unclear if it had been carried out by an individual or a group, foreign or domestic.

Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who heads the House Homeland Security Committee, said the authorities believe that the explosives were similar to improvised explosive devices that have been used against American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. McCaul, a former federal prosecutor who received briefings Tuesday morning from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Homeland Security officials, also said that the authorities still did not know whether the attack was a foreign or domestic plot.

A law enforcement official said at least one and probably both of the bombs were pressure cookers filed with nails and ball bearings and black powder that were detonated with rudimentary “kitchen-type” timers. The official said investigators believe the bombs were hidden inside bags or backpacks and left on the street or sidewalk near the finish line.

A senior government official who had spoken with intelligence and law enforcement officials said Tuesday that there had been “no pre-attack chatter” detected by the government from members of Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups. In two intelligence briefings the official said he had received in recent weeks, there was “nothing was offered on this” type of attack.

The official said that the intelligence agencies had begun to go back and examine communications they intercepted in recent weeks to determine whether they had missed anything. “Before the 2009 Christmas Day bombing attempt, they thought there was no pre-attack chatter,” said the official. “But there had been, but it had not been interpreted. Everything is now being looked at.”

Along with having few investigative leads, the official said that the investigation had been hampered, in part, by the fact that no terrorist group had claimed responsibility for the attack. Such a claim of responsibility, the official said, would help investigators as they try and weed out suspects.

Rudimentary explosive devices made from pressure cookers have been widely used in attacks in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, all countries where the cooking device is common, according to a Department of Homeland Security warning notice issued in 2010. But they have occasionally turned up in attacks in the United States as well: Faisal Shahzad, an American citizen who tried a car-bomb attack on Times Square in 2010, included a pressure cooker loaded with 120 firecrackers in the collection of jury-rigged explosives in his vehicle. The devices smoked but never exploded.

Law-enforcement officials urged the public on Tuesday to share any video or photographs they had taken of the marathon or the blast.

F.B.I. agents, Boston police detectives, the state police and investigators from other agencies assigned to Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were being assisted by an F.B.I. Evidence Recovery Team from New York and F.B.I. specialists from the bureau’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., who are expert in the handling of videos and photographs, a law enforcement official said.

“There is a tremendous volume of images that are being evaluated,” the official said.

Katharine Q. Seelye reported from Boston, and Michael Cooper from New York. Reporting was contributed by John Eligon and Jess Bidgood from Boston, Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum and Mary Pilon from New York, and Mark Landler, and Michael S. Schmidt, Eric Schmitt and Abby Goodnough from Washington.

BOSTON — The explosives used to kill three people and injure 176 at the Boston Marathon on Monday were likely some kind of “pressure-cooker” devices that sent sharp bits of shrapnel flying into victims in the vicinity of the blast, several law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Surgeons at several Boston hospitals told televised news conferences on Tuesday that the explosive devices had apparently been packed with small pellets and sharp “nail-like” objects that were designed to maim their victims.

The new details about the explosives emerged as President Obama announced at the White House that the F.B.I. was investigating the attack as “an act of terrorism,” but said that it was unclear if it had been carried out by an individual or a group, foreign or domestic.

Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who heads the House Homeland Security Committee, said the authorities believe that the explosives were similar to improvised explosive devices that have been used against American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. McCaul, a former federal prosecutor who received briefings Tuesday morning from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Homeland Security officials, also said that the authorities still did not know whether the attack was a foreign or domestic plot.

A law enforcement official said at least one and probably both of the bombs were pressure cookers filed with nails and ball bearings and black powder that were detonated with rudimentary “kitchen-type” timers. The official said investigators believe the bombs were hidden inside bags or backpacks and left on the street or sidewalk near the finish line.

A senior government official who had spoken with intelligence and law enforcement officials said Tuesday that there had been “no pre-attack chatter” detected by the government from members of Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups. In two intelligence briefings the official said he had received in recent weeks, there was “nothing was offered on this” type of attack.

The official said that the intelligence agencies had begun to go back and examine communications they intercepted in recent weeks to determine whether they had missed anything. “Before the 2009 Christmas Day bombing attempt, they thought there was no pre-attack chatter,” said the official. “But there had been, but it had not been interpreted. Everything is now being looked at.”

Along with having few investigative leads, the official said that the investigation had been hampered, in part, by the fact that no terrorist group had claimed responsibility for the attack. Such a claim of responsibility, the official said, would help investigators as they try and weed out suspects.

Rudimentary explosive devices made from pressure cookers have been widely used in attacks in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, all countries where the cooking device is common, according to a Department of Homeland Security warning notice issued in 2010. But they have occasionally turned up in attacks in the United States as well: Faisal Shahzad, an American citizen who tried a car-bomb attack on Times Square in 2010, included a pressure cooker loaded with 120 firecrackers in the collection of jury-rigged explosives in his vehicle. The devices smoked but never exploded.

Law-enforcement officials urged the public on Tuesday to share any video or photographs they had taken of the marathon or the blast.

F.B.I. agents, Boston police detectives, the state police and investigators from other agencies assigned to Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were being assisted by an F.B.I. Evidence Recovery Team from New York and F.B.I. specialists from the bureau’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., who are expert in the handling of videos and photographs, a law enforcement official said.

“There is a tremendous volume of images that are being evaluated,” the official said.

Katharine Q. Seelye reported from Boston, and Michael Cooper from New York. Reporting was contributed by John Eligon and Jess Bidgood from Boston, Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum and Mary Pilon from New York, and Mark Landler, and Michael S. Schmidt, Eric Schmitt and Abby Goodnough from Washington.

BOSTON — The explosives used to kill three people and injure 176 at the Boston Marathon on Monday were likely some kind of “pressure-cooker” devices that sent sharp bits of shrapnel flying into victims in the vicinity of the blast, several law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Surgeons at several Boston hospitals told televised news conferences on Tuesday that the explosive devices had apparently been packed with small pellets and sharp “nail-like” objects that were designed to maim their victims.

The new details about the explosives emerged as President Obama announced at the White House that the F.B.I. was investigating the attack as “an act of terrorism,” but said that it was unclear if it had been carried out by an individual or a group, foreign or domestic.

Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who heads the House Homeland Security Committee, said the authorities believe that the explosives were similar to improvised explosive devices that have been used against American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. McCaul, a former federal prosecutor who received briefings Tuesday morning from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Homeland Security officials, also said that the authorities still did not know whether the attack was a foreign or domestic plot.

A law enforcement official said at least one and probably both of the bombs were pressure cookers filed with nails and ball bearings and black powder that were detonated with rudimentary “kitchen-type” timers. The official said investigators believe the bombs were hidden inside bags or backpacks and left on the street or sidewalk near the finish line.

A senior government official who had spoken with intelligence and law enforcement officials said Tuesday that there had been “no pre-attack chatter” detected by the government from members of Al Qaeda or other terrorist groups. In two intelligence briefings the official said he had received in recent weeks, there was “nothing was offered on this” type of attack.

The official said that the intelligence agencies had begun to go back and examine communications they intercepted in recent weeks to determine whether they had missed anything. “Before the 2009 Christmas Day bombing attempt, they thought there was no pre-attack chatter,” said the official. “But there had been, but it had not been interpreted. Everything is now being looked at.”

Along with having few investigative leads, the official said that the investigation had been hampered, in part, by the fact that no terrorist group had claimed responsibility for the attack. Such a claim of responsibility, the official said, would help investigators as they try and weed out suspects.

Rudimentary explosive devices made from pressure cookers have been widely used in attacks in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, all countries where the cooking device is common, according to a Department of Homeland Security warning notice issued in 2010. But they have occasionally turned up in attacks in the United States as well: Faisal Shahzad, an American citizen who tried a car-bomb attack on Times Square in 2010, included a pressure cooker loaded with 120 firecrackers in the collection of jury-rigged explosives in his vehicle. The devices smoked but never exploded.

Law-enforcement officials urged the public on Tuesday to share any video or photographs they had taken of the marathon or the blast.

F.B.I. agents, Boston police detectives, the state police and investigators from other agencies assigned to Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were being assisted by an F.B.I. Evidence Recovery Team from New York and F.B.I. specialists from the bureau’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., who are expert in the handling of videos and photographs, a law enforcement official said.

“There is a tremendous volume of images that are being evaluated,” the official said.

Katharine Q. Seelye reported from Boston, and Michael Cooper from New York. Reporting was contributed by John Eligon and Jess Bidgood from Boston, Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum and Mary Pilon from New York, and Mark Landler, and Michael S. Schmidt, Eric Schmitt and Abby Goodnough from Washington.


  • 0

#2 jonjon

jonjon

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 3,031 posts
  • LocationAthens, Texas

Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:56 PM

Not your average "Right Wing, Tea Party, Patriot, Home Grown Terrorist"

Amd_mug_faisal-shahzad.jpg

Faisal Shahzad (Urdu: فیصل شہزاد; born June 30, 1979) is a Pakistani/American citizen who was arrested for the attempted May 1, 2010, Times Square car bombing. On June 21, 2010, in Federal District Court in Manhattan, he confessed to 10 counts arising from the bombing attempt. Throughout his court appearance, Shahzad was unrepentant. The United States Attorney indicated there was no plea deal, so Shahzad faced the maximum sentence, a mandatory life term.

Shahzad was arrested approximately 53 hours after the attempt, at 11:45 p.m. EDT on May 3, 2010, by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. He was taken into custody at John F. Kennedy International Airport, after boarding Emirates Flight 202 to Dubai. His final destination had been Islamabad, Pakistan.

 

 


  • 0

#3 jaman

jaman

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 878 posts
  • Locationminnesota-GODS country

Posted 16 April 2013 - 02:42 PM

Does this mean that we are going to have to hand in our cook ware?  Martha Stewart hand them in ...  


  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

  • Privacy Policy